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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1924 




SOMERVILLE PrESS PrINT. 

1925. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 



Office of the City Auditor^ 

January 22, 1925. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — In accordanee with the requirements of 
Section 3 of Ordinance Number 44, T herewith submit a report 
of the expenditures and receipts during the year 11)24, show- 
ing in detail the approi)riation and expenditur-es, and the re- 
ceipts from each source of income. Also a statement of the 
funded debt and temporary loans, table relative to matumties 
and interest, a balance sheet showing the assets and liabilities 
at the close of the fiscal year and a statement of the treasurer's 
cash. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Howard E. Wemyss. 

City Auditor. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1924 
REVENUE 



Receipts 



General: — 



Taxes 

Corporation, Bank and Income Taxes 

Licenses and Permits 

Fines and Forfeits .... 

State. Vocational School 

State. Continuation Sclwol 

State Americanization 

County of Middlesex. Dog Licenses 

Smith-Hughes Fund 

Sale of Land ..... 

Miscellaneous .... 



Special Assessments 

Departmental : — 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation . 

Highways .... 

Charities .... 

Soldiers' Benefits 

Schools and School Buildings 

Libraries .... 

Baths and Bathhouse 

Surplus War Bonus Fund . 

Miscellaneous 



Water Department Accounts 
Interest on deposits, taxes, etc. 
Temporary Loans 
Hunt Art Fund .... 
Refunds 

Total receipts 

Balance at beginning of period 



. $3,053,326 


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335.211 


64 






17.416 


28 






15.S39 


90 






13,615 


67 






5,795 


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3,S61 


53 






2,145 


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2,802 


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1.087 


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1.1S6 


32 


$3,452,288 








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74,489 


84 


8,654 


53 






3,467 


29 






15,354 


62 






24,150 


98 






43,974 


33 






8,861 


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12,901 


64 






2,130 


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46,598 


06 


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87 


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$167,221 








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$305,802 


45 






30,847 


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1,950,000 


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1,000 


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4,069 


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$5,985,719 04 
65,615 15 

$6,051,334 19 



<'ITV AUDITOR. 



CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1924. — Continu«ed 



Payments 

Appropriations 

Income of Trust Funds 

Trust Fund, Hunt Art 

Temporary Loans 

Court Judgments 

Tax Titles . 

Comm. of Mass. Taxes and Assessments 

Comm. of Mass., acct. Polls 1923 

Grade Crossings Advances 

County Tax .... 

Refunds ..... 

Total Payments . 
Transfer to Non-Revenue . 
Balance on hand . 



NON-REVENUE 



$3,067,029 04 

3,785 40 

700 23 

1,950,000 00 

1,136 37 

257 39 

349,550 82 

522 00 

50 00 

128,995 57 

1,406 82 



i,503,433 64 
287,107 23 
260,793 32 

;,051,334 19 



Receipts 

Redemption of Tax Titles . 

Liquor Fees for State 

Refunds 

Total Receipts .... 
Transfer from Revenue 
Balance at beginning of period . 



Payments 



Appropriations 
Redemption of Tax Titles . 
Liquor Fees to Comm. of Mass. 

Total Payments . 
Balance on hand . 



Summary 



Total Revenue Receipts 
Total Non-Revenue Receipts 



Total balance at beginning of period 



Total Revenue Payments . 
Total Non-Revenue Payments 



Total balance on hand 



$2,670 25 

6 00 

44,294 32 



$507,826 15 
2,670 25 

5 75 



$46,970 57 

287,107 23 

251,841 79 

$585,919 59 



$510,502 15 
75,417 44 

$585,919 59 



$5,985,719 04 

46,970 57 

$6,032,689 61 

317,456 94 

$6,350,146 55 

$5,503,433 64 

510,502 15- 

$6,013,935 79 

336,210 76 



$6,350,146 55 



8 



ANNUAL REPORTS 





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24 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Payments 

State Tax ... ... 

State Highway Tax .... 

Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 
Metropolitan Park Assessment " . 
Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Wellington Bridge Assessment . 
Wellington Bridge Special Assessment 
Charles River Basin Assessment 
Alewife Brook Assessment 
Fire Prevention Assessment 
Division Metropolitan Planning 
Soldiers" Exemption Assessment 

Poll Taxes 1923 

Liquor License Fees 1924 . 
Refund Corporation Taxes 1923 
Refund National Bank Taxes 1923 . 
Refund National Bank Taxes 1924 . 



Corporation Taxes 1924 . 
Corporation Taxes 1923 . 
Corporation Taxes 1921 . 
Corporation Taxes 1920 . 
National Bank Tax 1924 . 
National Bank Tax, Prior 



Years 



Street Railway Tax 1924 . 

Income Taxes 1924 

Income Taxes 1923 . 

Income Taxes 1922 . 

Account Pedlers' State License 

Account Boxing- Licenses . 

Vocational School 

Continuation School . 

Americanization 

Smith-Hughes Fund . 

In Lieu of Taxes 

Diseases Dangerous to Health . 

General Aid to Poor . 

Mothers' Aid .... 

State Aid ..... 

Military Aid .... 

Soldiers" Burials 

Tuition State Wards . 

Surplus War Bonus Fund . 

Interest Grade Crossings Account 



$162,100 

1,131 

102,039 

68,004 

142,275 

2,010 

1,340 

9,627 

1,026 

1,116 

900 

253 

522 

5 

6 

1 



00 

51 

97 
00 
86 
10 
90 
83 
08 
72 
45 
26 
00 
75 
00 
59 



73 10 







$492,435 12 


pts 








$102,822 


81 




10,085 


01 




319 


80 




275 


39 




2,541 


37 




383 


88 




16,202 


84 




188,213 


22 




10,536 


50 




3,830 


82 




75 


00 




208 


28 




13,615 


67 




5,795 


30 




3.861 


53 




2,802 


51 




86 


99 




2,122 


93 




13,685 


01 




18,286 


53 




7,297 


00 




1,452 


50 




111 


67 




2,727 


98 




46,598 


06 




2,586 


28 



$456,524 88 



County Tax 



CITY AUDITOR. 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX 

Payments 



25 



$128,995 57 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES 
Revenue 



Total amount as per assessors commit- 
ments 

Less State Taxes 

County Taxes 

Overlay ...... 



Amount raised for municipal purposes . 
Other Revenue: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: — 

Income Tax 1922 and Prior Years, 
Excess 

Income Tax 1923, Excess 

Income Tax 1924 .... 

Corporation Taxes 1924 . 
• Corporation Taxes, Prior Years . 

National Bank Taxes 1924 
, National Bank Taxes Prior Years . 

Interest Grade Crossing Account . 
Revenue from Taxes, Supplementary 

Warrants ..... 

Penalty on Coal Contract 1923 . 
Somerville Visiting Nurse Association 
Special Excise Tax .... 
Estimated Revenue ., . $565,950 00 

Excess .... 16,493 91 



Appropriations from Reserve Fund, 
Surplus from Overlays . . . . 

Appropriations from Excess and De- 
ficiency 



Total Revenue 



Expenses 



General Appropriations 

Outlay Appropriations 

Court Judgments .... 

Metropolitan and Other Assessments 



Excess of Reyenue 



$163,231 51 

128,995 57 

27,796 79 



$3,830 82 

10,536 50 

188,213 22 

102,822 81 

10,674 20 

2,468 27 

382 29 

2,586 28 

532 36 

698 99 

500 00 

30 27 

582,443 91 



7,136 37 
74,000 00 



$3,057,598 33 

290,900 00 

1,136 37 

186,319 31 



$2,910,413 70 



320,023 87 
$2,590,389 83 



986,856 29 
$3,577,246 12 



3,535,954 01 
$ 41,292 11 



26 



ANNUAL RKTORTS 



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CITY AUDITOR. 



27 



FUNDED DEBT 

Tlic total funded debt of the city Januai-y 1, 1924 was 
f l,74t?,500.0(). No debt was incurred during the year. The 
total funded debt of the city December 31, 1924 was |1,579,- 
000.00, a deci'ease of |164,500,00, maturities of this amount 
having been paid during the year. 



Classified Debt January 1, 1924 



City Loan 

City Hall Additions Loan 

Sewer Loan 

Public Building Loan 

Highway Loan 

Schoolhouse Loan 

Bridge Loan 

Total within limit 
Sewer Loan 
Metropolitan Park Loan 

Total outside limit 

Total funded debt 



$155,500 00 

150,000 00 

161,000 00 

193,000 00 

201,000 00 

845,000 00 

26,000 00 



6,000 00 
6.000 00 



$1,731,500 00 



12,000 00 
$1,743,500 00 



Maturities reducing the debt were as follows :- 



City Loan 

City Hall Additions Loan 

Sewer Loan 

Public Building Loan 

Highway Loan . 

Schoolhouse Loan 

Bridge Loan 

Total within limit 
Sewer Loan 
Metropolitan Park Loan 

Total outside limit 

Total Maturities . 



$25,500 00 

8,000 00 

17,000 00 

18,000 00 

46,000 00 

45,000 00 

1,000 00 



$3,000 00 
1,000 00 



$160,500 00 



4,000 00 
$164,500 00 



Classified Debt December 31, 1924 



City Bonds 31/2% 

City Bonds 4% . 

City Hall Additions Bonds 4% . 

City Hall Additions Bonds 4^4% 

Sewer Bonds 31/2% . 

Sewer Bonds 4% 

Sewer Bonds 4^4% . 

Public Building Loan Bonds 4% , 

Public Building Loan Bonds 4l^% 



; 8,000 00 
122,000 00 

72,000 00 
70,000 00 
38,000 00 
87,000 00 
19,000 00 
120,000 00 
55,000 00 



28 



ANM Al. RKIX^RTS 



Highway 
High\\"ay 
Highway 
Highway 



Bonds 44*^ 

Bonds 4«^ . 

Bonds 3U^ 

Bonds 5% . 



Sehoolhouse Roads 4^ 
Bridge Bonds 3»4<^ . 

Total within limit 

Sewer Bonds 4^~ 

^retropolitan Park Bonds 3H^ 

Total outside limit 

Total funded debt 



20.000 


00 




56.000 


Oi^ 




14.000 


00 




65.000 


00 




SOCOOO 


00 




25.000 


00 


; 






? 1.571.000 00 


So. 000 


00 




5.000 


00 








8.000 00 




$1,579,000 00 



Tlio ilebr per capita on December 81. 19i!4 was .^15.7!^. 
Tlie nuio of debt to valuation was 1.5S^r. A limit of 2.5*^ 
is tixed by statute. Tax rate per -SI. 000 valuation on account 
of Reduction of Funded Debt was fl.66. 



TAXES 

Tlu^ total amount of taxable property as of April 1. 11)21: 
was $99,81 t,000.(K). Tlie tax rate was fixed at $2S.70. 



State Tax 

State Highway Tax . 
Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 
Metropolitan Park Assessment . 
Wellington Bridge Assessment 
Charles River Basin Assessment 
Alewife Brook Assessment 
Fire Prevention Assessment 
Division Metropolitan Planning 

County Tax 

City Budget 

Overlay ...... 

Total amount raised . 
Less Estimated Revenue . 
Appropriated from Excess and Deficiency 
State Income Tax . 
Corporation Tax .... 
National Bank Tax . 
Poll Taxes 



Xet Amount Assessed in Taxe? 



$162,100 

l.i:U 

102.089 

6S.004 

3.351 

9.627 

1.026 

1.116 

900 

12S.995 

3.246.587 

27.796 



00 

51 

97 

00 

00 

S3 

OS 
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45 
57 
50 
79 





$3,752,677 42 


$565,950 00 




15.000 00 




172.813 72 




85.000 00 




3.500 00 




60.1SS 00 






902.451 72 



$2,850,225 70 



Appropriations, classified under general headings, were 
made from revenue as follows : — 



General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways ...... 



$139,031 00 

541.120 00 

288.420 00 

313.560 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



L>!) 



Charities 

Soldiers' Benefits 

Education 

Libraries 

Recreation 

Unclassified 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Water Works 



Less estimated receipts and appropria- 
tions from Excess and Deficiency . 

Raised by taxation for city purposes 



113,460 00 

37,440 00 

1,008,880 00 

75,470 00 

83,670 00 

111,680 00 

269,156 50 

264,700 00 

$3,246,587 50 

842,263,72 

$2,404,323 78 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



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31 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



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ANNUAr. KKl'ORTS 



BORROWING CAPACITY DECEMBER 31, 1S24 



Valuation 1922 
Supplementary 

Valuation 1923 
Supplementary 

Valuation 1924 
Supplementary 



Total three years 
Abatements 1922 
Abatements 1923 
Abatements 1924 



Average valuation for three years . 
Two and one-half per cent 
Present debt within limit 

Borrowing capacity December 31, 1924 . 

Maturities in 1925: — 

January 1, 

April 1, 

July 1 $26,000 00 

Less Outside Limit . . 4,000 00 
vOctober 1 



188,158,139 27 
8,400 00 

92,519,400 00 
9,000 00 

99,311,000 00 
6,500 00 



$88,166,539 27 



$92,528,400 00 



$500,867 00 
472,012 00 
401,450 00 



199,317,500 00 
$280,012,439 27 



1,374,329 00 

$278,«38,110 27 

92,879,370 09 

2,321,984 25 

1,571,000 00 

.'$750,984 2& 



$33,000 00 

71,000 00 

22,000 00 

21,000 00 



$147,000 00 



$897,984 25 



('[TY AUDITOR. 35 

ABATEMENTS SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS PRIOR YEAflS 

Charges : 

Street Sprinkling 1923 . 

Sidewalks 1921 .... 

Betterments 1921 .... 



$14 


TO 


19 


82 


«3 


00 


19 


82 


63 


00 


14 


70 



Credit: 

Re-assessment Sidewalk 1921 . 
Re-assessment Betterment 1921 
Excess and Deficiency 



WATER CHARGES 1923 ABATED 
Charges: 

Metered 

Credit : 

Excess and Deficiency .... 

REFUNDS BILLS RECEIVALE 
Charge: 

Maintenance Highway Buildings . 
Credit: 

Excess and Deficiency .... 

STATE INCOME TAXES 

Credit: 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 1922 $3,830 82 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 1923 10,536 50 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 1924 188,213 22 



Estimate 1924 $172,813 72 

Revenue 1924 29,766 82 



CORPORATION TAXES 

Credits : 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 

Prior Years 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 1924 

Charges : 

Estimate 1924 

Refund Account 1923 .... 
Revenue 1924 



NATIONAL BANK TAXES 
Charges : 

Estimate 1924 

Refund Account 1923 .... 
Refund Account 1924 .... 

Credit: 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 

Prior Years 

Cash from Commonwealth Account 1924 
Revenue 1924 



$97 52 



$97 52 



$15 


22 


1^15 


22 


$35 


00 


$35 00 



$202,580 54 



$202,580 54 



$10,680 
102,822 


20 

81 


$113,503 


01 






$85,000 

6 

28,497 


00 
00 
01 


$113,503 


01 






AXES 








$3,500 

1 

73 


00 
59 
10 


$3,574 


69 






$383 

2,541 

649 


88 
37 
44 


$3,574 


69 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS 

SALE OF LAND 
Credit: 

Cash, sale of land Murdock Street . . $600 00 

Cash, sale of land Waltham . . 312 00 

Cash, sale of land North Marion Street 175 68 

11,087 68 

Charge: 

Appropriated for Outlay Purpose . . 350 00 

Balance to 1925 Account . . $737 68 

TAX TITLES 
Charges: 

Balance from 1923 Account . $1,661 13 

Taxes 1923 246 08 

Taxes 1924 11 31 

$1,918 52 

Credits: 

Cash. Titles sold 515 72 

Balance to 1925 Account . . . $1,402 80 

REAL ESTATE LIENS 
Charges: 

Balance from 1923 Account ... $24 73 

Credit: 

Excess and Deficiency .... $24 73 

GRADE CROSSINGS ADVANCES 

Charges: 

Balance from 1923 Account . . . $427 30 

Cash Advance ...... 50 00 



Balance to 1925 Account . . $477 30 

COURT JUDGMENTS 
Charge: 

Judgment paid $1,136 37 

Credit: 

Appropriation Reserve, Surplus Overlay $1,136 37 

TAILINGS 

Credit: 

Balance from 1923 Account ... $291 65 

PREMIUMS ON BONDS 
Credit: 

Balance from 1923 Account . . $3,343 50 

Charge: 

Appropriated Reduction of Funded Debt $3,343 50 



CITY AUDITOR. )>7 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS 
Credit : 

Balance from 1923 Account . . . ^428 82 

Charge: 

Appropriated Interest .... $428 82 

SURPLUS WAR BONUS FUND 

Credit: 

Cash from Commonwealth . . . $46,598 OS 

REVENUE FROM TAXES, SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANTS 

Credits: 

Balance from 1923 Account . . . $471 28 
Supplementary Warrants, 1923 . . 180 00 
Supplementary Warrants, 1924 . 528 55 
Abated Polls, Charged to Common- 
wealth 129 00 



Charges : 

Abatements $140 92 

Credit Commonwealth Account Polls 

1923 90 00 

Collections credited to Revenue 1924 . 532 36 



$1,308 83 



$768 28 



Balance to 1925 Account . . $545 55 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 

Cretlit: 

Cash Received $2,670 25 

Charge: , 

Cash paid, Titles redeemed . . , $2,670 2S 

OVERLAY ACCOUNTS 

Overlay 1917 
Charge : 

Balance from 1923 account ... $6 00 

Credit: 

Appropriated from Reserve, Surplus 

Overlay $6 00 



Overlay 1920 
Credit: 

Balance from 1923 account . 
Adjustment taxes 1920 .... 


$257 65 
5 00 


$262 65 
$262 65 


Charge: 

Reserve Fund, Surplus from Overlays . 





38 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Overlay 1921 
Credit: 



Balance from 1923 


$97 10 


Adjustment taxes 


1921 .... 


20 10 


Commonwealth 


of Massachusetts, 




abated polls . 


. . . 


60 00 


Charges : 






Abatements 


> • • • • 


$71 10 


Reserve Fund, Sur 


•plus from Overlays . 


93 66 



Charges : 

Abatement* . . . . . . $8,373 42 

Reserve Fund, Surplus from Overlays 11,787 46 



$177 20 



$164 76 



Balance to 1925 account . . $12 44 



Overlay 1922 
Credit: 

Balance from 1923 account 
Taxes paid after abatement . 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
abated polls . . . 

Charges: 

Abatements ...... 

Reserve Fund, Surplus from Overlays 



Balance to 1925 account ... $50 60 



Overlay 1923 
Credits: 

Balance from 1923 account . . $19,645 68 

Taxes paid after abatement ... 31 28 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

abated polls 1,269 00 

$20,945 96 



$1,165 68 
10 00 




'. 507 00 


$1,682 68 




$797 90 
1 834 IS 


$1,632 OS 





20,160 88 



Balance to 1925 account . . . $785 OS 



Overlay 1924 
Credit: 

Taxes 1924 $27,796 79 

Charges : 

Abatements 12,375 62 



Balance to 1925 account . . . $15,421 17 



GITY AUDITOR. 

RESERVE FUND, SURPLUS FROM OVERLAYS 

Credit: 

Balance from 1923 account . 

Overlay 1920 . - 

Overlay 1921 

Overlay 1922 

Overlay 1923 

Charges: 

Appropriated to Overlay 1917 
Appropriated to Court Judgment . 
Appropriated to General Appropriations 

Balance to 1925 account . . . 



39 



$8,547 88 

262 65 

93 66 

834 18 

11,787 46 


$21,525 
7,142 


83 
37 


$6 00 

1,136 37 

1 6,000 00 




• 


$14,383 


46 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY 

Credit: 

Balance from 1923 account . 
Refunds 1923 accounts .... 
Revenue Excess 1924 .... 

Charges: 

General Appropriations .... 

Outlay Appropriations . . 

Special Assessment 1923 Apportioned 

Adjustment Accounts Receivable . 

Abatements Special Assessments Prior 
Years . . 

Water Charges 1923, Abated or Re- 
funded ...... 

Real Estate Liens 



Balance to 1925 account . 



$90,449 

595 

41,292 


86 
01 
11 


$132,336 9S 






$16,500 

57,500 

364 

41 


00 
00 
50 
00 




14 


70 




15 
24 


22 
73 


74,460 15 








157,876 83 



40 ANNUAL REPORTS 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



Receipts 



General Revenue 
Taxes : — 

Taxes 1924 

Taxes 1928 

Taxes 1922 

Taxes 1921 

Taxes 1920 

Prom State: — 

Corporations, Prior Years . 
Corporations, 1924 
National Bank, Prior Years 
National Bank, 1924 . 
Street Railway 1924 . 
Income, 1922 and Prior Years 
Income, 1923 
Income, 1924 
Excise Tax, Ship Owners . 



. $2,471,789 


39 


580,835 


02 


405 


34 


33 


66 


262 


65 


10,680 


20 


102,822 


81 


383 


88 


2,541 


37 


16,202 


84 


3,830 


82 


10,536 


50 


188,213 


22 


24 


35 



Licenses and Permits: 

Licenses: — 

Dealers in Motor Vehicles 

Amusements 

Junk .... 

Milk .... 

Pool, Billiards and Bowling 

Sunday 

Innholders and Victuallers 

Pedlers .... 

All other .... 

Permits: — 

Marriage . . . 

Buildings 

Electrical 

All other .... 



975 00 

1,233 00 

705 00 

426 00 

324 00 

1,248 50 

144 00 

1,240 00 

1,332 28 

1,284 00 

3,222 50 

3,925 50 

1.356 50 



Fines and Forfeits: 

Court Fines .... 

Departmental Penalties . 

Tax Titles Sold to Individuals 



14,400 74 

1,010 49 

428 67 



Grants and Gifts: 

From State: — 

Vocational School 
Continuation School 
Smith-Hughes Fund 
Americanization 

From County: — 

Dog Licenses .... 
Miscellaneous : — 

Somerville Visiting Nurse« As«oc. 



13,615 67 

5,795 30 

2,802 51 

3,861 53 

2,145 27 

500 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



41 



All Other General Revenue: 

Sale of Land . 

State, in lieu of Taxes 

Tailings 

Conscience Fund 

Miscellaneous 



1,087 68 

86 99 

28 98 

40 00 

6 00 



Total General Revenue 




$3,451,788 18 


Commercial Revenue — Special Assessments^ 






For Expenses: — 






Street Sprinkling 1924 .... 


$38,541 


24 


Street Sprinkling 1923 .... 


7,883 


22 


For Outlays: — 






Sewers 1924 


1,759 


75 


Sewers 1923 






1,506 


30 


Sidewalks 1924 






2,099 


49 


Sidewalks 1923 






2,483 


86 


Sidewalks 1921 






19 


82 


Street Betterment 1924 






9,010 


00 


Street Betterment 1923 . 






11,060 


81 


Street Betterment 1921 






63 


00 


Apportioned Street Bet 


term 


ents 


62 


35 



Total Commercial Revenue — Spe- 
cial Assessments 



$74,489 84 



Commercial Revenue- 



General Government 

Treasurer 

Collector 

Assessors 

City Clerk 

Engineering 

Commissioner of Buildings 

City Messenger 



Depart 


mental 








$914 


00 






4,953 


52 






1 


50 






1,909 


06 






1 


45 






250 


00 






625 


00 



Protection of Persons and Property 

Police: — 

Rent of Court Room 

Miscellaneous . . . . 

Fire: — 

Sale of old materials . 
Sealer of Weights and Measures . 
Electrical Department 



1,687 50 
234 76 

740 00 
701 63 
103 40 



Health and Sanitation 

Contagious Hospital 
Health Department 
Inspection , > 

Sanitary: — 

Collection Ashes and Waste 

Incinerator 

Sanitary Buildings 



8,726 75 

787 93 

2,044 00 

2,856 80 

300 00 

639 14 



42 



ANNUAL RErORTS 



Highways 

I^bor and Materials 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Sidewalk Construction 
Street Sprinkling 
Rent of Tenements . 

Charities 

Aim house: — 

Sale of Produce, etc. 
Board 

Outside Relief: — 
Individuals 
Cities and Towns 



State 
Mothers 
Cities 
State 



Aid: — 
and Towns 



Soldiers' Benefits 

State Aid 

Military Aid ...... 

Soldiers' Burials . . . . . 

Education 

Tuition State Wards . . . . 

Other Tuition 

School Department. Miscellaneous 
Rent of High School Hall . 
School Buildings ..... 
Miscellaneous . . . . . 

Libraries 

Fines. Lost Books, etc. . . . . 
Recreation 

Shower Baths ...... 

Bathhouse ...... 

Unclassified 

State. Surplus War Bonus Fund . 
Electrolysis ...... 

Tax Titles Fees 

« 

Total Commercial Revenue — De- 
partmental . . . . 



23.433 86 
64 45 

363 63 
59 04 

230 00 



2,632 46 



4,18' 



99 



70 

3,584 

13.685 


00 
35 
01 


1.528 
18,286 


76 
53 


7.297 

1.452 

111 


00 
50 
67 


2,727 

8,984 

47 

245 

888 

8 


98 
12 
72 
00 
66 
16 


2,130 


S3 


405 
635 


80 
25 


46.598 
500 

87 


06 
00 

05 




$167,721 55 



Commercial 

Water Department 
Sale of Water: — 

Metered 1924 

Metered 1923 

Annual 

Additional 
Service Assessment! 
Maintenance Bills 



Revenue — Public Service Enterprises 



$232,064 73 

35,208 83 

18.357 75 

916 98 

8,559 72 

10,694 44 



Total Commercial Revenue- 
Public Service Enterprises 



$305,802 45 



CITY AUDITOR. 



4a 



Commercial Revenue- 
Deposits, City Treasurer . 
Deposits, City Clerk .... 

Ti*xes 

Special Assessments .... 
Apportioned Assessments . 
From State, Account Grade Crossings 
Real Estate Liens .... 
Miscellaneous ..... 

Trust Funds: — 

School 

Library 

Poor 

Total Commercial Revenue — In 
terest .... 



— Interest 






$10,532 


32 




19 


40 




16,227 


45 




264 


77 




17 


82 




2,586 


28 




37 


49 




4 


51 




228 


00 




854 


32 




75 


05 




- 




$30,847 41 



Municipal Indebtedness 

Temporary Loans: — 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Total Municipal 



Indebtedness 



$1,950,000 00 



$1,950,00.0 00 



Agency, Trust and Investment 
Agency : — 

Redemption of Tax Titles 
Liquor Licenses for State 

Trust and Investment: — 

Hunt Art Fund 

Total Agency, Trust and Invest- 
ment 

Refunds 

General Appropriations .... 
General Appropriations, Account Prior 

Years 

Outlay Appropriations .... 
Soldiers' Benefits 

Commonwealth : — 

Poll Taxes 1921 

Poll Taxes 1922 

Poll Taxes 1923 

Total Refunds . . . . 

Total Receipts .... 



$2,670 
6 


25 
00 






1,000 


00 


$3,676 








25 


$1,058 


62 






589 

44,294 

457 


01 
32 
00 






60 

507 

1,398 


00 
00 
00 


$48,363 








95 




$6,632,689 


61 



44 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



EXPENDITURES 



General Government 



Board of Aldermen Expenses 






Expenses 


Outlays 


Books, postage and supplies 

Printing and advertising . 

Refreshments 

Badges .... 


96 
25S 
790 

S8 


36 
00 
30 
20 






Special Items: — 

Gavels .... 
Stenographic service 


15 
52 


44 

72 


1,801 02 












Clerk of Committees Department 










Salaries and Wages: — 

Clerk .... 2 
Assistant Clerk 


,200 

800 


00 
00 






Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 
Printing and advertising 
Telephone 


SO 

6 

69 


21 
00 
48 







Executive Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Mayor .... 


4,980 87 


Secretary 


1,650 00 


Clerks .... 


1,216 67 


Other Expenses: — 




Auto Maintenance . 


400 00 


Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


195 79 


Printing and advertising 


147 00 


Telephone 


184 68 


Inauguration Expenses . 


79 00 


Contingent Expenses 


357 99 


All other .... 


10 95 


Special Item: — 




Typewriter 


25 00 


Auditing Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Auditor 


3,500 00 


Clerks .... 


2,253 58 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies 


240 02 


Printing and advertising 


632 12 


Telephone 


68 00 


Binding 


52 00 


All other 


16 97 



2,155 69 



9,247 95 



6,762 69 



CITY Al'DITOR. 



Assessors' Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Chairman 
Assessors 

Assistant Assessors 
Clerks (Office) 
Clerks (Street) 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 

Printing and advertising 

Carfares, Disbursements, 
etc .... 

Telephones 

All other . . . . 



3,000 00 

5,200 00 

1,650 00 

8,065 67 

550 00 



990 82 
4,287 92 

34 47 
53 88 

35 24 



Licensing Commission 






Salaries and Wages: — 






Commissioners 


900 


00 


Secretary 


300 


00 


Inspector 


200 


00 


Clerk .... 


784 


59 


Assistant . . . 


240 


00 


Other Expenses: — 






Books, postage and sup- 






plies .... 


145 


63 


Pedlers' License Commission 






Books, postage and sup- 






plies .... 


24 


00 



Expenses 



45 

Outlays 



Treasury Department 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Treasurer and Collector 


4,000 


00 




Deputy Collector 


2,200 


00 




Cashiers 


2,772 


29 




Clerks .... 


10,118 


05 




Tax Investigator 


215 


00 




Other Expenses: — 








Books, postage and sup- 








plies .... 


3,220 


66 




Printing and advertising 


906 


00 




Telephone 


155 


68 




Bonds .... 


285 


00 




Car Fares 


13 


40 




All other ... 


126 


45 




Special Items: — 








Adding Machine 


330 


26 




Check Writer . 


39 


20 




Insurance 


323 


16 




Convention Expenses 


34 


90 


24.740 05 



23,868 00 



2,570 22 



24 00 



m 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Certification of Notes and Bonds 
Certifying .... 150 00 



City Clerk's Department 
Salaries and Wages: — 
City Clerk 
Assistant City Clerk 
Clerks . . . . 
Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 
Printing and advertising 
Binding 
Telephone 
All other .... 



City Messenger's Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Messenger 

Other Expenses: — 

Stationery and postage 

Auto Maintenance 

Telephone 

Carfares 

All other . . 

Engineering Department 

Salaries and Wages: — 
City Engineer . 
Assistants 
Clerks . ' . 



a,800 00 
2,200 00 
4,130 74 



708 17 
214 61 

61 50 
157 28 

82 75 



Registration of City Laborers 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Registration Clerk 


450 00 


Other Expenses: — 




Stationery and postage 


29 59 


Law Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




City Solicitor 


2,800 01 


Asst. City Solicitor 


1,000 00 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


40 00 


Printing and advertising 


H 75 


Recording 


38 47 


Clerical Hire . 


163 50 


Telephone 


30 00 


Service Fees . 


33 85 


All other .... 


2 10 



2,399 


99 


6 


00 


541 


35 


22 


41 


19 


00 


19 


28 



4,000 00 
6,816 26 
1,100 50 



Expenses 



150 00 



Outlays 



11,355 05 



479 59 



4,111 68 



3,008 08 



Carried forward 



11,916 76 



CITY AUDITOR. 47 

Outlays 







Expenses 


Broui^hL forward 


11,916 76 




Other Expenses: — 






Supplies, printing, post- 






age .... 


144 98 




Telephone 


102 81 




Auto Maintenance . 


768 60 




Instruments and equip- 






ment .... 


24 92 




Carfares .... 


209 56 




All other . . 


6 60 


13.174 23 



Public Buildings Department, Com- 
missioner of Public Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioner 

Inspector of Plumbing . 

Clerks .... 
Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 
Printing and advertising 
Telephone 

Auto Maintenance . 
All other .... 

Special Item: — 
Razing Buildings 



Public Buildings Department, Main- 
tenance Municipal Buildings 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitor . . . 5,561 73 

Labor .... 1,966 13 

Other Expenses: — 



3.300 


00 


2,100 


00 


2,376 


07 


355 


95 


106 


12 


182 


70 


625 


00 


56 


92 


250 


00 



9,352 76 



Fuel and Light 


, 


, 


1,139 


88 




Furniture and 


furnish- 








ings 




. 


3,115 


67 




Janitor supplies 


, 




442 


77 




Repairs to build 


ings 




100 


97 




Heating apparatus < 


and 








equipment 




. 


13 


82 




Plumbing and 


supplies 


115 


95 




Hardware and mater 


ials 


200 


42 




Ice . 


^ 


. 


159 


52 




All other . 


. 


.- 


243 


90 




Special Items: — 












Moving Safes . 






532 


25 




Rent Safes 






21 


00 




Filing Case . 




. 


67 


25 




Flags 




; 


137 


50 




Waxing Floors 




• 


166 


40 


13.985 16 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS 







Expenses Outlays 


City Hall Additions 








Construction Contract 


107,750 


10 




Architect Contract 


5,434 


98 




Electrical Contract 


2,575 


15 




Electrical Fixtures . 


2,342 


00 




Heating and Ventilating 








Contract . 


3,825 


65 




Plumbing Contract 


5.244 


25 




Furnitur: and Furnish 








ings .... 


6,697 


35 




Equipment and Supplies 


6,304 


12 




Counters 


9.638 


50 




Insurance 


687 


09 




Tcsver Clock 


925 


00 




Relocating Telegraph Box 








es . . . . 


209 


75 




Vault Doors and Equip 








ment 


2,318 


74 




Grading Grounds 


4,979 


20 




Miscellaneous Lalx)r . 


467 


54 




Drivewav and Walks . 


2.033 


37 




Tile .... 


1.221 


66 




Wall .... 


563 


67 




All other 


483 


83 


163,701 95 








City Planning Board 








Printing 


341 


92 




Other supplies 


58 


75 




Catering 


106 


00 


\(i Rl 



Election txpenses, City Clerk 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Clerks ... 
Other Expenses: — 

Equipment, supplies, sta- 
tionery and postage . 

Printing and advertising 

Carfares and auto hire 

Refreshments 

Repairs ballot boxes 

All other . . . 

Special Items: — 

Mailing cards . 

Telegraph Loop 

Ne^ ballot boxes . 



600 00 



321 


64 


658 


16 


466 


50 


73 


10 


30 


00 


43 


71 


353 


03 


34 


50 


350 


00 



2,930 64 



Election Expenses, Registrars of 
Voters 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Registrars ... 1,510 00 

Clerks .... 2,435 75 



Carried forward 



3.945 75 



Brought forward 



CITY AU1>1T0R. 



3,945 75 



Other Expenses: — i. 




Stationery and postage 




and supplies 


143 92 


Printing and advertising 


1,672 74 


Refreshments . . . 


38 80 


Car hire , . . . 


99 00 


Registers . . • ' 


129 68 


Posting . . V • 


80 79 



Eligction Expenses, Pay of Election 
Officers 



Salaries and Wages: — 
"Wardens . 
Inspectors 
Clerks 



828 00 
3,115 00 

828 00 



Public Buildings Department, 
Maintenance Polling Places 



Labor .... 


269 85 


Teaming ... 


167 10 


Lumber . . . 


268 08 


Hardware and materials 


191 36 


Fuel and Light . 


18 69 


Rent Halls . 


70 00 


Repairs buildings 


42 53 


All other . . 


91 86 


Special Item: — 


^ - 


Constructing drain and 


^ 


manhole ' '. . 


488 50 


Police Department 


. 


Salaries and Wages: — 




Chief . . . 


, 3,300 00 


Captains and Lieuten 




ants 


15,250 00 


Sergeants and Inspectors 


13,500 00 


Patrolmen 


173,127 32 


Special police . 


2,197 86 


Matrons 


1,092 45 


Other employees 


7,226 72 


Equipment and Repairs: — 




Motorcycle and auto 




maintenance 


1,552 31 


New Equipment . 


50 13 


Equipment for men 


329 89 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, printing, postage 




and supplies 


571 96 


Care of prisoners . 


241 48 


Telephone 


422 24 



Expenses 



49 

Outlays 



6,110 68 



4,771 00 



1,607 97 



Carried forward 



218,862 36 



m 



AKNUAL REa*<MtTS 



Brought forward 

Laundry 

Travel and disburse 

ments 
Reimbursements for in 
juries, etc. 
Bedding . 
Convention expenses 
All other . 

Special Items: — 
Secret Service 
Motorcycles 
Typewriter 



218,862 36 
71 56 

268 66 

362 45 

112 34 

90 00 

7 77 

230 50 
491 00 

182 50 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Public Buildings Depart 


ment, Mainte- 


nance Police Buildings 


Salaries and Wages: — 




Janitors . 


2,168 58 


Labor 


203 97 


Maintenance of Buildings: 


— 


Fuel and light 


1,951 88 


Janitors' supplies . 


72 48 


Purniture and furnish- 




ings 


340 23 


Hepairs to buildings 


38 81 


Heating apparatus and 




equipment 


78 17 


Plumbing and supplies 


40 88 


Hardware and materials 


88 66 


Ice .... 


45 90 


J^ll other . 


46 60 


Fire Department 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Chief Engineer 


3,300 00 


Assistant Engineer 


2.750 00 


Firemen 


237,826 15 


Equipment and Repairs: — 




Apparatus and equipment 


: 6,438 55 


Hose 


907 55 


Equipment for men 


4 85 


Power 


9 20 


Hardware, tools, etc. 


148 10 


All other . 


22 52 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, printing, postage 




and supplies 


148 92 


Telephone 


682 13 


Janitors' supplies . 


340 13 


Furnishings 


48 52 


Laundry work 


468 74 


Ice .... 


68 65 


Reimbursements 


18 72 


All other . 


71 26 



220.679 14 



5,076 16 



Carried forward 



253,253 99 



Brought forward . 25,^,^58 99 

Supplies: — 

Grease and oil . . 315 85 

Gasoline .... 988 86 

Soda and acid ... 325 17 

All other .... 44 46 



Expenses Owtlayf 



Fire Department, Addi 
tional Apparatus: — 

Apparatus . . . 9,481 12 



254,928 ^3 



PubUc Buildings Department, 


Maintenance 




Fire -Buildings 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Labor . . . 


1,562 


^ 




Other Exi)enses: — 








Fuel and light 


7,154 


29 




Furniture and furnish- 








ings .... 


226 


80 




Repairs to buildings 


232 


43 




Heating apparatus and 








other equipment 


339 


61 




Plumbing supplies . 


246 


78 




Hardware and materials 


271 


06 




All other .... 


81 


95 




Special Item: — 








Installing electricity, 








Union Square station 


112 


19 


10,227 7« 








Weights and Measures 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Sealer .... 


2,100 


00 




Assistant 


1,381 


6« 




Miscellaneous Labor 


8 


00 




Other Expenses: — 








Books, stationery and 








postage 


49 


58 




Printing and advertising 


40 


90 




Equipment and supplies 


54 


86 




Telephone 


37 


25 




Auto maintenance . 


281 


53 




Special Item: — 








Repainting car . 


40 


00 


3,993 72 


' 






Electrical Department 








Salaries and Wages: — 








Commissioner 


2,800 


00 




Clerk ..... 


944 


76 




Labor .... 


13,138 


12 




Other Expenses: — 








Fire Alarm System 


1,613 


65 




Police Signal System 


296 


18 




Auto maintenance 


669 31 




Carried forward 


19,462 


02 





9.4iZl 12 



oli 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Telephone 
Books, printing, 

and supplies 
All other . 

Special Item: — 
Inspection 



postage 



19,462 02 


Expenses 


144 13 




189 93 
90 19 




• 852 60 


20,738 87 



Outlays 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
Electrical Department Buildings 

Janitor 1,217 93 

Fuel 653 82 

Light .... 45 24 

All other .... 50 



Underground Construction 




Cable and Wires 


1,531 60 


Posts .... 


903 45 


Express ... 


9 00 


Highways, Suppression of Moths 




Labor *. . . . 


4,187 23 


Books, printing postage 


12 50 


Hired teams and trucks 


419 07 


Hardware, tools and equip- 




ment .... 


12 22 


Insecticides ... 


275 99 


Other materials and sup- 




plies .... 


43 34 


Gasoline .... 


48 24 



1,917 49 



2,444 05 



4,998 59 



Highway Department, Care of Trees 



Printing, Stationery 

Postage 
Labor . . 
Teams and trucks 
Equipment and tools . 
Lumber and materials 
Use of steam roller . 
All other 



and 



. 3 


25 


; 4,884 


04 


844 


01 


140 


65 


153 


42 


24 


50 


10 


29 



6,060 16 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Health Department 

General Administration: — 
Agent .... 1,750 00 

Clerks .... 3,199 00 

Medical Inspector and 

Bacteriologist . 2,780 00 

Carried forward . 7,729 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Brought forward 

Health Nurses 

Books, printing and 
postage 

Carfares, etc. . 

Telephone 
Quarantine and Contagious 

Diseases: — 

Cities and Towns . 

State . . . . 

Other Institutions . 

Tuberculosis : — 

Board and Treatment 
Cities and Towns . 
State .... 

Other Institutions . 
Groceries and Provisions 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment and supplies 

Auto ambulance main- 
tenance 

Burying dead animals . 

All other .... 

Ice . . , . 

Special Item: — 

Typewriter 



7,729 00 
3,825 00 

334 21 
325 56 
302 43 



2,049 79 
166 03 
360 50 



2,531 36 

4,272 93 

35 00 

707 97 

18 89 

524 37 

112 50 
15 79 

74 50 

77 00 



City Clerk's Department, Vital Statistics 
Canvassing and reporting 

.births .... 757 30 

Reporting deaths . . 120 75 

Postage and supplies . 5 00 

All other . . . . 35 



Contagious Hospital 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Matron .... 
Nurses and other help 

Other Expenses:.^ — : 
Drugs and medicines 
Bedding, dry goods and 

clothing 
Groceries and provisions 
Equipment and supplies 
Telephone 
Electrical power 
All other .... 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 

Contagious Hospital 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitor and Labor . 1,061 60 



ESxpenses 



5S 

Outlays 



23,462 83 



S83 40 



1,083 34 




9,853 40 




118 68 




635 62 




5,880 64 




1,613 20 




74 18 




122 91 




39 11 






19,421 08 



Carried forward 



1,061 60 



54 ANNUAL KEPOirrs 



Brought forward . . 1,061 60 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel .... 

Light . . . 

Janitors' supplies . 

Furniture and furnish- 
ings .... 

Repairs to buildings 

Heating apparatus and 
equipment 

Plumbing and supplies . 

Hardware and materials 

All other .... 

Special Item: — 
Insurance 



Inspection of Animals and Provisions 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspector . . . 2,300 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Telephone ... 32 40 

Auto maintenance . . 150 00 



1.435 


20 


473 


29 


4 


00 


40 


51 


41 


87 


153 


&5 


128 


77 


103 


66 


12 


40 


215 


00 



Inspection of Milk and Vinegar 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspector 
Milk Collector 

Other Expenses: — 

Books. printing and 

postage 
Auto maintenance . 
Equipment and supplies . 
All other . . . . 

Special Item: — 

New machinery and 

equipment . . 282 97 



2,750 


00 


1,750 


00 


83 


64 


600 


00 


179 


56 


8 


52 



Inspection of School Children 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Inspectors . . 1,600 00 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies . . 18 75 

Carfares ... 109 72 



School Nurses' Salaries 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Nurses .... 2,550 00 



"EkxpensMi Outlay* 



3,669 95 



2,482 40 



5,654 69 



1,728 47 



2.550 00 



CITT AUDITOR. 



Sewers Construction 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Labor 


1,450 26 


Other Expenses: — 




Teaming 


374 39 


Pipe and fittings 


801 33 


firick and cement , 


1,611 18 


Castings 


923 94 


Other Materials 


11 65 


Contract Work 


2,401 25 


All other . 


280 95 



Engineering Department, Sewers 
Maintenance 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 

Sewer Bu^iidings 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Labor .... 10 36 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel .... 86 50 



Light 

Lumber and materials 
Repairs to building 
All other . 



97 68 

2 75 

32 37 

12 50 



Sanitary Department 




General Administration: — 




Superintendent 


2,400 00 


Bookkeeper 


300 00 


Printing and stationery . 


64 75 


Telephone 


54 82 


Auto maintenance . 


600 43 


All other 


12 00 


Ashes, Rubbish and Garbage :- 


- 


Labor . ". . . 


73,122 27 


Hired teams and trucks 


70,656 93 


Equipment and repairs 


206 25 


Rent of dump . 


1,570 00 


Materials and supplies 


48 86 


Contract work 


33,450 00 



E/xpensea 



55 

Outlays 



7,854 95 



Salaries and Wages: — 








Inspector 


938 


48 




Labor .... 


12,041 


44 




Other Expenses: — 








Teaming 


10,799 


22 




Tools and equipment 


215 


97 




Other materials and sup- 








plies .... 


130 


52 




Care of Med ford Street 








Pump 


284 


55 




Telephone 


66 


92 




Power .... 


9 


69 




All other .... 


1 


00 


24,487 79 



242 16 



Carried forward 



182,486 31 



o6 



ANNUA! . REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Stable Expenses: — 
Shoeing 

Veterinary and medicine 
Stable equipment 
Board of horses 
Horses . . . . 
All other . . . . 



Expenses 



Outlays 



182,486 31 




317 55 




13 00 




36 25 




• 1,208 25 




79 50 




35 






184,141 21 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 

Sanitary Buildings 
Labor .... 34 44 



Fuel .... 

Light 

Lumber and Materials 

Plumbing and supplies 

Repairs to Buildings . 



77 00 

232 32 

168 87 

7 53 

450 00 



Highways, Street Cleaning 




Labor 


17,418 66 


Hired Teams and trucks 


2,941 41 


Equipment 


291 70 


Sweeper Maintenance 


2,378 36 


Supplies 


69 51 


Special Item: — 




Auto Sweeper . 


7,500 00 



970 16 



30,599 64 



Highway Maintenance 
General Administration: — 
Superintendent 
Bookkeeper and Clerk 
Books, printing, postage 

and supplies 
Telephone 
Maintenance Superin 

tendent's Auto 
All other . 
General: — 
Labor 
Trucks 
Tools, equipment and 

repairs 
Autos and supplies 
Broken stone, gravel 

etc. 
Edgestones. bricks and 

cement 
Lumber 

Tarvia and road oil 
Fuel . . . . 

Oil and waste . 



3,300 00 

3,099 00 

.234 45 

229 18 

61 64 

9 90 

63,373 76 

16 50 

455 49 

3,755 64 

.5,449 76 

1,754 56 

357 77 

5,623 34 

359 22 

655 59 



Carried forward 



88,735 80 



CITY AUDITOR. 









Expenses 


Brought forward 


88,735 


80 




Steam rollers , 


127 


09 




Hardware. paint and 








varnish 


1,185 


19 




Other materials and sup- 








plies 


471 


19 




Hay, grain and straw 


7.522 


83 




Shoeing 


200 


68 




Veterinary and medicine 


116 


75 




Harnesses and horse 








clothing 


340 


63 




All other . . . . 


17 


32 




Other Expenses: — 








Signs . . . . 


197 


14 




All other 


10 


50 




Special Items: — 








Taxes, City of Waltham 


280 


00 




Superintendent's auto . 


1,140 


00 




Repairs to fence 


1,480 


14 




Paving . . . . 


306 


16 




Fords 


1,328 


00 




Snow Plow 


284 


20 






103,743 


62 




Less service transfers for 








teaming, use of rollers 








and horses 


12,310 


33 


91,438 29 








Highway Construction, Ne^ 


^ Streets 






Labor 


2,376 


14 




Hired Teams and trucks 


261 


05 




Use of roller 


52 


50 




Contracts . . . . 


19,802 


96 




Tarvia 


4,182 


72 




Advertising, Recording, etc 


128 


65 




Edgestones and circles 


7,428 


35 




Crushed stone 


1,629 


93 




Mixer 


30 


00 




Other materials . 


385 


51 





5T 

Outlays 



36,277 81 



Highways Construction, Pernrtanent Pavement 



Labor .... 


346 83 


Contracts .... 


47,652 85 


Crushed stone, brick and 




cement 


100 64 


Paving blocks 


1,342 20 


Other materials . 


22 83 


Hired teams and trucks . 


63 73 


Use of mixer and roller . 


17 00 


All other .... 


53 50 


Special Item: — 




Relocating hydrants 


335 28 



49,934 86 



r>8 



ANNUAL REl^RTS 



Highway. Reconstruction and Resurfacing 



Labor .... 


4.781 


90 


Hired teams and trucks 


639 


11 


Use of roller 


863 


00 


Tools and equipment . 


507 


60 


Road Binders 


• 9,543 


12 


Brick, stone and cement 


8,842 


47 


Other materials . 


47 


78 


Asphalt 


1.247 


73 



Bxpenses 



Outta-ys 



26.472 71 



Sidewalks Construction 



Labor 


5.136 OS 


Hired teams and trucks 


733 79 


Stone, brick and cement 


1.800 69 


Edgestone 


88 56 


Mixer 


163 69 


Other Materials . 


819 26 


Equipment . . 


172 37 


Recording- 


10 90 


Setting edgestone 


899 84 



9.S25 IS 



Sidewalks Maintenance 

Labor . . . . 

Hired teams and trucks . 
Use of mixer 
Stone, brick and cement . 
Other materials and sup- 
plies 
Equipment 



6,311 


99 


1,174 


41 


4 


50 


1.469 


27 


624 


56 


15 


00 



9,599 73 



Street Sprinkling 



Labor .... 


6,756 


90 




Hired teams and trucks . 


2.800 


77 




Equipment and repairs 


339 


63 




Oil and other dust layers 


17,006 


65 




Maintenance water posts 








and hydrants . 


567 


14 




Use of car sprinkler . 


6.206 


67 




Gravel .... 


6.825 


31 




Hardware and materials . 


21 


00 




All other .... 


134 


98 




Special Item: — 








Erecting tank 


250 


00 


40.909 05 



Street Lighting 

Contract: — 
Electricity 
Spot Lights 
-Memorial tablets 



70,543 74 




49 84 




74 24 






70,667 82 



GITY 


AXJDia:OR. 




59 








Expenses 


Outlays 


Public Buildings Department, 


Ma 


intenance 






Highway Buildings 










Labor .... 




74 98 






Fuel 




1,050 29 






Light .... 




253 21 






Hardware and materials . 




4 37 






Lumber .... 




75 00 






Plumbing supplies 




83 88 






Furniture and furnishings 




6 54 






Repairs to buildings . 




202 81 






Heating apparatus and 










equipment 




698 84 






All other .... 




2 50 


*>. AK9! A9. 





Welfare Department, Miscellaneous 

General Administration: — 

Agent .... 2,400 00 

Clerks .... 2,312 01 
Books, printing, postage 

and supplies . . . 117 93 

Telephone ... Ill 13 

Conference Expenses . 118 92 

All other .... 5 50 

Outside Relief: — 

City Physician . . 2,300 00 
Acting City Physician . 87 96 
Auto maintenance . . 150 00 
Board and care . . 1,294 49 
Cash .... 24,599 93 
Cash Allowance . . 993 02 
Groceries and provisions 1,522 00 
Coal and wood . . 8 25 
Medicine and medical at- 
tendance . . . 173 84 
Nursing ... 44 00 
Dry goods and clothing . 40 01 
State Institutions . . 4,359 07 
Other Institutions . . 66 43 
Somerville Hospital . 8,732 15 
Burials .... 443 00 

Relief by other Cities or Towns: — 

Cities .... 9.970 70 

Mothers' Aid: — 

By City .... 34,926 00 

Other Cities or Towns . 4,604 79 

Taxi and ambulance hire . 188 00 



Welfare Department, City 


H 


omc 






Salaries and Wages: — 










Warden and Matron 






2,400 


00 


Bookkeeper 






150 


00 


Domestic labor 


. 




2,822 


53 


Farm labor 


• 




2,965 


40 



99,569 13 



Carried forward 



8,337 93 



60 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward . . 8,337 93 

Other Expenses: — 

Auto maintenance . . 73 35 

Groceries and provisions 3,955 39 

Clothing . • 266 26 

Medicine and hospital 

goods ... 102 22 
Household furnishing 

and supplies . . 220 46 
Farm equipment and 

supplies . . . 340 72 
Live stock and care . 194 00 
Hay, grain and feed . 845 56 
Horse shoeing . . 42 35 
Harnesses and horse cloth- 
ing ... . 3 90 
Seeds and fertilizer . 106 03 
Books, printing, station- 
ery, postage . . 11 05 
Telephone ... 64 26 
Power .... 49 06 
Ice .... Ill 33 
Disinfectant and sprayer 11 60 
Carfares and employ- 
ment .... 45 65 
All other .... 88 67 



Public Buildings Department, 


City 


Home Buildings 




Labor .... 


364 94 


Fuel 


1,988 90 


Light .... 


495 69 


Furniture and furnishings 


100 06 


Repairs to buildings . 


127 28 


Plumbing and supplies 


169 53 


Heating apparatus equip- 




ment and repairs . 


102 30 


Hardware and materials . 


50 41 


All other .... 


35 54 


Special Item: — 




Insurance 


126 78 



Expenses Outlays. 



14,869 79 



3,561 43 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

Soldiers' Benefits, General Administration 
Salaries and wages: — 



Agent .... 
Clerk .... 
Other Expenses 


300 00 

1,099 00 

33 08 


1,432 08 
25,206 15 


Soldiers' Relief 

Cash as per pay rolls . 
Medicine and Medical At- 
tendance 


24,841 00 
365 15 



state Aid 

Cash as per pay rolls 



Military Aid 

Cash as per pay rolls 

Soldiers' Burials 
Burials 



CITY AUDITOR. 



6,296 00 



3,884 50 



120 00 



expenses 
6,296 00 

3,884 50 

120 00 



61 

Outlays 



EDUCATION 



School Contingent 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Superintendent 


5,000 00 


Clerks 


8,618 78 


Truant Officer . 


2,000 00 


Other employees 


383 83 


General Expenses: — 




Stationery, postage and 


[ 


office supplies 


2,013 69 


Telephones 


1,203 53 


Automobile maintenance 


; 410 56 


Travel 


135 82 


All other . 


318 80 


Textbooks and Supplies :- 


- 


Text and reference books 


1 


and Music . 


13,983 96 


Maps 


205 89 


Stationery and supplies 


14,683 96 


Equipment and repairs 


1,406 60 


Manual Training Sup 




plies 


4,916 04 


Other Expenses: — 




Support of Truants 


910 02 


Diplomas and graduation 


838 23 


Printing and advertising 


556 29 


Catering 


118 75 


Power 


727 16 


Binding 


1,052 15 


Disbursements 


793 88 


All other . 


60 00 


Special Items :^ — 




Typewriters 


1,667 50 


Machinery 


875 00 


Truck Body . . 


250 00 


Projector 


211 86 



63,342 30 



6f 



ANNUAL RRr(«fcTS 



School Department, Outside Tuition 
Tuition: — 

City of Boston. . . 5,411 03 

Other Cities . . 1,905 71 



School Teachers' Salaries 

Day Schools . . . 750,623 00 

Evening Schools . . 9,615 38 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance^ 
School Buifldings, Janitors' Salaries 

Janitors' Salaries . . 69,369 79 



Bxpensea 



7,316 74 



760,238 S8 



69,369 79 



^utla.]r» 



Maintenance School Buildings, Fuel and 
Light 



Fuel 
Light 



38,702 00 
10.962 38 



49.664 SS 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
School Buildings, Buildings and Grounds 



Labor .... 


10,877 


25 




Furniture and furnishings 


5,476 


16 




Janitors' Supplies 


2,690 


12 




Laundry .... 


77 


01 




Repairs to buildings . 


4.4S0 


94 




Heating apparatus and 








equipment 


5,060 


34 




Plumbing 


2,546 


15 




Glass, hardware and paint 


3,355 


45 




Lumber .... 


584 


19 




Other materials and sup- 








plies .... 


3,246 


32 


• 


Care of grounds . 


2.942 


89 




Flags and Flag poles . 


383 


44 




Auto maintenance 


358 


65 




Power .... 


346 


26 




Teaming .... 


1.417 


86 




All other .... 


120 


65 




Special Items: — 








Constructing drain and 








basin .... 


260 


00 




Insurance 


194 


00 




Taxes. Vinal Avenue 


115 


70 




Painting and panelling 








High School 


2,270 


00 




Retubing boilers 


2,642 


00 




Fences .... 


809 


38 




Installing radiators, 








Knapp School 


1,017 


00 




Layia^ floor . 


295 


02 


51,566 78 



fSterthern — Eastern Jurvi-or High Sehool 

Construction Contract . &3,»26 73 

Heating Contract . . 13,792 00 

Electrical Contract . . 2,718 50 

Plumbing Contract . . 3,629 30 

Equipment . . 875 03 

Architects Pees . . . 3,918 98 

Furniture and Furnishings 26,723 42 

Hardware Contract . . 945 37 

Picture Machine . . 760 72 

Vises .... 336 00 

Resurfacing school yeards 3,682 66 

Labor . . . 509 57 

Bronze Tablet . 1 . 265 00 

Setting glass ... '^6 00 

Repair ceilings . . . 457 00 

Fixtures .... 3,!933 15 

All other . . . . 948 14 






1UM7 67 



Additiorval Land Southern Junior High SchoO;! 

Taking of land and build- 
ings .... 1,000 00 

Settlement of claim for 

damages . . . 500 00 



Additional Land, Durell School 

Taking of land . . . 1,350 00 



ijsoo 00 



1,SS0 00 



SCHOOL TRUST FUNDS 

S. Newton Cutler Funds 

Books .... 394 22 



394 22 



Smith-Hughes Fund 

School Teachers' Salaries . 2,635 29 



Caroline G. Baker Fund 

Christmas celebrations . 17 68 





LIBRARIES 


Central Library 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Librarian 


3,300 00 


Assistants 


19.227 66 


Other Expenses: — 




Books 


6,142 86 


Periodicals 


666 24 


Music 


91 61 


Carried forward 


2B,428 37 



2,635 29 



17 68 



M 



ANNUAL RKI'ORTS 



Expenses 



Brought forward 


29,428 


37 




Binding . . . : 


1.571 


44 




Postage and oflace sup- 








plies . . 


1.062 


86 




Printing and advertising 


653 


17 




Telephone 


111 


68 




Express 


159 


61 




Cards .... 


100 


00 




All other .... 


61 


58 




Special Item: — 








Typewriter 


75 


75 


33,224 46 








Public Buildings Department, 


Maintenance 




Central Library 








Janitors .... 


3,339 


63 




Labor .... 


27 


31 




Fuel . . 


1,043 


86 




Light .... 


1,469 


22 




Furniture and furnishings 


180 


16 




Janitors' Supplies 


102 


80 




Repairs to buildings . 


61 


30 




Plumbing .... 


4 


00 




Hardware and materials . 


91 


83 




All-- other .... 


8 


10 




Special Item: — 








Interior Decorating and 








Painting 


6,007 


00 


12,335 21 



Outlays 



West Somerville Branch Library 
Salaries and "Wages: — 



Assistants 


5,793 62 


Other Expenses:—^ 




Books .... 


2,121 61 


Periodicals 


302 44 


Music .... 


55 75 


Binding ... 


495 14 


Postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


164 48 


Printing and advertising 


36 62 


Telephone . . 


34 18 


Express 


208 07 


All ofher .... 


- . 7 79 



9,219 70 



Public Buildings Department, Maintenance 
West Somerville Branch Library 

Janitor . . 1,481 29 

Labor . . 150 25 

Fuel 600 54 

Light . . . 280 75 



Carried forward 



2,512 83 



Brought forward . . 2,512 83 

Repairs to buildings and 

plumbing .... 50 15 

Care of Grounds . . 74 93 

Hardware and materials . 5 00 

All other .... 1 50 



CITY AUDITOR. 65 

Expenses Outlays 



East Somerville 


• 
; Branch Li 


brary 


Salaries and Wages: — 




Assistants 


. 


4,326 69 


Other Expenses 


: — 




Books 


. 


1,005 35 


Periodicals 




118 60 


Music 


. 


32 92 


Binding 




360 63 


Postage and 


office sup- 




plies 




198 46 


Printing and 


advertising 


10 50 


Telephone 




34 84 


Express 


• 


206 74 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance East Somerville Branch Library 

Janitor .... 1,221 29 

Labor 109 80 

Fuel 498 55 

Light 122 02 

Furniture and furnishings 11 37 

Janitors' supplies . . 1 30 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment ... 46 74 
Repairs to buildings and 

plumbing .... 35 25 

Hardware and materials . 18 53 

All other .... 14 11 



Union Square Branch Library 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants 
Other Expenses: — 

Books .... 

Periodicals 

Binding .... 
Postage and office sup- 
plies .... 
Printing and advertising 
Telephone 
Express .... 



4,500 


©4 


1,320 


12 


126 


37 


459 


64 


154 


96 


19 


72 


40 


31 


208 


08 



2,644 41 



6,294 63 



2,078 96 



6,829 24 



156 ANNUAL RBPORTvS . 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Union Square Branch Library 

Janitor .... 1.221 29 

Labor 52 52 

Fuel 559 48 

Light 234 96 

Furniture and furnishings 3 30 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment ... 43 08 
Plumbing and repairs to 

buildings . . . . 4 47 

Hardware and materials . 6 46 

All other .... 29 35 



Expenses Outlays- 



2,154 91 



PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



S. Newton Cutler Fund 

Books 37 87 



/Martha R. Hunt Art Fund 

Books and pictures . . 134 70 



;Hunt Art Fund Special 

Book and pictures . . 700 23 



llVlartha R. Hunt Book Fund 

3ooks 501 06 



)saac Pitman Art Fund 

Books 6 81 



Hunt Fund For Expenses 

Books . . . . • 57 77 



37 87 



134 70 



700 22 



501 Oj6 



6 81 



57 77 



Engineering Department, Parks Mainte- 
nance 

Labor 7,680 25 

Teaming 

Tools and equipment . 

Materials and supplies 

Trees, shrubs and plants 

Repairs 



595 76 
19 28 

241 15 
4,036 65 
1,018 64 



Carried forward . . 16,104 56 





CITY 


AUDITOR. 




67 


Brought forward 
Flags and flag poles . 
Care of bubblers and foun- 
tains' . . . . 
Care of grounds . 
All other . 




16,104 56 
69 30 

235 59 

556 42 

35 60 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Special Items: — 










Fences 

(trading 

Gardening 




451 33 
771 74 
362 48 


16,074 19 





Public Buildings Department, 
nance Park Buildings 

Labor ..... 
Teams ..... 

Fuel 

Light 

Repairs to buildings . 
Plumbing .... 
Hardware and materials 
Laundry and Janitors' 

Suppiie* .... 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment 
All other .... 

Special Item: — 

Connecting gas heater . 



Mainte- 

471 74 

2 25 

418 98 

221 97 

166 65 

149 45 

42 45 

190 35 

198 46 
30 88 



126 29 



Park and Playground Improvement 


Labor ..... 


439 25 


Teams and trucks 


43 13 


Granolithic sidewalks 


1,911 02 


Miscellaneous supplies 


81 18 


Gardening, Plants, etc. 


2,521 47 


Engineering Department, 


Playgrounds 


Maintenance 




Labor 


4.838 51 


Teaming .... 


244 88 


Apparatus .... 


65 00 


Tools and equipment . 


195 60 


Materials and supplies 


286 42 


Repairs to fountain, fences, 




etc 


411 58 


Repairing seats . 


72 00 


All other .... 


46 25 


Special Items: — 




Building backstops . 


223 44 


Tennis court . 


665 92 



2,019 47 



4,996 05 



7,049 60 



68 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Public Welfare and Recreation Commis- 
sion 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Supervisors 
Instructors 
Labor .... 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment and supplies 

Teaming .... 

Civic social centre . 

Demonstrations 

All other .... 



Expenses 



Outlays 



1,258 


33 


3.865 


16 • 


197 


63 


981 


42 


38 


00 


120 


18 


374 


65 


164 


41 



6,999 78 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Bathhouse 



Salaries and Wages: — 

Attendants 

Labor .... 

Other Expenses: — 

Bathing suits . 

Towels .... 

Repairs to Buildings 

Equipment and supplies 

Sand . . . . 

Telephone 

Laundry . . . . 

Hardware and materials 

All other .... 

Special Item: — 

Insurance 



1,219 


00 


100 


14 


233 


08 


165 


00 


72 


80 


76 


60 


390 


00 


35 


64 


80 


28 


54 


96 


27 


25 


97 


00 



2,551 75 



Celebrations 




Labor .... 


16 20 


Printing and postage . 


31 50 


Music .... 


1,068 00 


Decorating . 


77 50 


Fire works . 


1,500 00 


Refreshments 


80 25 


Lumber 


251 34 



3,024 79 



Improvement of Playgrounds, Walter 
Ernest Shaw 

Constructing sewer and 

catch basin .... 340 00 

Constructing retaining wall 4,654 03 



4,994 03 



Improvement of Playground, West Som- 
erville Junior High School 

Labor 38 24 

Teams 7 50 

Wall 243 51 

Materials .... 2 58 



CITY AUDITOR. 69 

Expenses Outlays 



Playground Ward Six 

Recording .... 9 84 
Taking of land and build- 
ing 42,561 28 

Taxes on property taken 1,134 79 



UNCLASSIFIED 
Memorial Day 

Music and Catering . 
Flowers and Flags . 
All other 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Bandstand 



271 81 




179 37 




85 55 






536 73 



Labor 


140 61 




Teaming .... 


115 50 




Hardware and Materials . 


23 84 


279 95 



Rifle Practice Cos. A d. B, First Engineers 

Use of Range ... 269 00 

Transportation . . . 476 00 



Municipal Documents 

Printing .... 2,521 69 



Quarters for George Dilboy Post V. F. W. 
Rent . . . . . 600 00 



Quarters for American Legion 

Rent . ... . . 645 00 



Quarters for Spanish War Veterans 
Rent 40 00 



745 Od 



2,521 69 



600 00 



645 00 



40 00 



291 83 



43,705 91 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Investigation of Railroad Rates 
Investigating . . . 500 00 



Workmen's Compensation 




Compensation for Injuries 


5,652 79 


Medical Attendance . 


546 60 


Books, postage, supplies 


3 50 


Pensions 




Janitors 


1,854 60 


Police .... 


10,293 67 


Fire 


5,688 85 


Weights and Measures 


812 40 


Health 


237 50 


Poor .... 


858 33 


Laborers : — 




Highway . 


10,159 74 


Sanitary . 


7,464 27 


Water . . . . 


3,914 81 



Damage to Persons and Personal Prop- 
erty 

Settlement of Claims . . 6,849 93 



Expenses 



500.00 



Outlays 



6,202 89 



41,254 17 



6,849 93 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 



Interest 

Temporary Loans: — 

Anticipation of Revenue 

Miscellaneous . 
General Loans: — 

Sewer 

Highway 

City . 

Bridge 

Metropolitan Park 

Public Building's 

School House . 

City Hall Additions 



39,610 16 
30 89 



6,278 

7.880 

5,850 

892 

210 

7,820 

33,160 

5,746 



75 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
18 



Reduction of Fu^nded Debt 




General Loans: — 




Sewer 


20,000 00 


Highway . 


46,000 00 


City .... 


25,500 00 


Bridge 


1,000 00 


Metropolitan Park . 


1,000 00 


Public Buildings 


18,000 00 


School House . 


41,730 00 


City Hall Additions 


7,926 50 



107,478 48 



161,156 50 



CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER WORKS 



Water Maintenance 
Administration: — 



Expenses 



71 

Outlays 



Commissioner 


3,300 


00 




Clerks .... 


9,303 


41 




Books, printing, postage 








and supplies . 


2,462 


90 




Telephone 


289 


21 




All other . . . . 


62 


39 




General: — 








Labor 


46,568 


68 




Pipe and fittings , 


3,484 


82 




Meters and fittings 


4,409 


92 




Hydrants and fittings 


771 


24 




Tools 


2,270 


91 




Autos, trucks and sup 








plies . . 


5,283 


99 




Horses and equipment 


436 


82 




Power 


10 


76 




Miscellaneous Supplies 


204 


71 




Street Repairs 


836 


47 




Fountains 


40 


82 




Street Sprinkling Hy 








d rants . 


147 


10 




All other . 


116 


72 




Special Items: — 








Contract Labor 


789 


43 




New Trucks 


585 


00 




Convention Expenses 


85 


98 




Typewriter 


96 


20 






81,557 


48 




Less Service Transfers for 








Teams 


254 


79 


81,302 69 








Water Works Extension 








Labor .... 


3,832 


54 




Hired teams and trucks 


163 


75 




Pipe and fittings 


17,467 


94 




Hydrants and fittings 


1,555 


08 




Meters and fittings . 


7,620 


52 




Tools and equipment . 


16 


50 




Contract 


3,458 


39 


34,114 72 








Public Buildings Depart 


ment, Mainte- 




nance Water Buildings 








Labor .... 


718 


54 




Fuel .... 


536 


43 




Light .... 


469 


36 




Lumber and Materials 


1,012 


40 




Repairs to buildings . 


46 


50 





Carried forward 



2,783 23 



72 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Heating apparatus and 

equipment 
Furniture and furnishings 
All other .... 

Special Items: — ' 

Sign . . . . 

Painting . . , . 



Expenses 



Outlays 



2,783 23 



37 58 

15 

4 70 

78 50 

79 20 



2,983 36 



Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Assessment .... 142,275 86 



142.275 86 



OTHER ACCOUNTS 
Temporary Loans 

Loans in anticipation of 



revenue 



1,950,000 00 



1,950,000 00 



Tax Titles 

Taxes 1923 . 
JLand Court Fees 



246 08 
11 31 



257 39 



Court Judgments 
Judgments paid . 

State Taxes 
State . 

Poll Taxes . 



1.136 37 



162,100 00 



522 00 



1,136 37 



162, 



100 00 
522 00 



Metropolitan and Other Assessments 

Metropolitan Park 
Metropolitan Sewer 
Wellington Bridge 
Charles River Basin 
Alewife Brook 
Prevention of Fire 
Grade Crossings . 
State Highway . 
Soldiers' Exemption 
Division Metropolitan Plan 
ning .... 



County of Middlesex 
County Tax 1924 



68,004 


00 




102,039 


97 




3,351 


00 




9,627 


83 




1,026 


08 




1,116 


72 




50 


00 




1,131 


51 




253 


26 




900 


45 


187,500 82 






128,995 


57 


128.995 57 



Cash Refunds 

Taxes 

Special Assessments 

Water 

Other 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Liquor License Fees . . 5 75 



CITY AUDITOR. 7.'> 

Outlays 





Expenses 


556 42 




134 30 




594 41 




121 69 






1 ICiH 99 



PRIVATE TRUST 

Redemption of Tax Titles 

Tax Titles Redeemed . 2,670 25 



5 75 



2,670 25 



Totals . . . $5,487,015 56 $477,337 97 

♦Refunds . . 5,287 94 44,294 32 



$5,492,303 50 $521,632 29 
Total Cash Payments . $6,013,935 79 



* Expenditures as shown in all accounts are net 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



SCHEDULE OF PUBLrC PROPERTY 







T^and and 








School Buildings 




Buildings 


Personal 


Totals 


Prescott 




72.200 00 


3,000 


00 


75,200 oa 


East Somerville Junior 


High 


62,000 00 


2.000 


00 


64,000 00 


Han scorn . 




• 66,500 00 


4,000 


00 


70,500 00 


Davis 




53,500 00 


17,500 


00 


71,000 00 


Clark Bennett . 




54,500 00 


3,500 


00 


58,000 00 


Knapp 




53.000 00 


5,500 


00 


58,500 00 


Baxter . . . . 




39,200 00 


1,500 


00 


40,700 00 


Perry 




52,000 00 


1,500 


00 


53,500 00 


Bell and Southern Junior 


High 


236,000 00 


10,000 


00 


246,000 00 


Pope 




83,600 00 


5,000 


00 


88,600 00 


Cummiugs 




18,400 00 


1,500 


00 


19,900 00 


Edgerly 




43,000 00 


5,000 


00 


48,000 00 


Northern Eastern Junior 


High 


611,000 00 


10,000 


00 


621,000 00 


* High 




396,000 00 


30,000 


00 


426,000 00 


Glines 




96,400 00 


5,000 


00 


101.400 00 


Forster 




64,000 00 


4,500 


00 




Forster (Annex) 




40.000 00 


3,500 


00 


112,000 00 


t Proctor . 




40,000 00 


4,000 


00 


44,000 00 


Bingham . . 




77,000 00 


5,000 


00 


82,000 00 


Morse 




59,000 00 


5,000 


00 


64,000 00 


Carr .... 




58,600 00 


4,500 


00 


63,100 00 


Durell 




23,800 00 


1,500 


00 


25,300 00 


Burns 




44,000 00 


3,000 


00 


47,000 00 


Brown 




80.000 00 


2,600 


00 


82,600 00 


Highland . 




71,600 00 


5,000 


00 


76,600 00 


Lowe 




57,000 00 


2,000 


00 


59,000 00 


Hodgkins . 




116,700 00 


5,000 


00 


121,700 00 


X West Somerville Junior 


High 


200,000 00 


8,000 


00 


208,000 00 


Lincoln 




21,800 00 


1,000 


00 


22,800 0» 


Cutler 




135,800 00 


10,000 


00 


145,800 00 


Total 


$3,026,600 00 


$169,600 


00 


$3,196,200 00 



• Land included in Central Hill Park 

t Building and fixtures. Land owned by State. 

X l>and included in Walter Ernest Shaw Playground 



CITY AUniTOR. 



75 



Fire Buildings 

New Fire Alarm Building 

Central 

Engine Two 

Engine Six 

Hose Five 

Ladder One 

Ladder Two 

Engine Four 



Total .... 

Includes Klectricul Depa-rtincnt eqiiipinent 



Tjand 


and 










Buildingrs 


Per"sonal 


Total 


s 


$27,500 


00 


*$105,000 


00 


$180,200 


00 


47,700 


00 










42,000 


00 


27,000 


00 


69,000 


00 


39,900 


00 


25,000 


00 


64,900 


00 


23,500 


00 


8,000 


00 


31,500 


00 


r>o,ooo 


00 


25,000 


00 


85,000 


00 


19,700 


00 


15,000 


00 


34,700 


00 


21.000 


00 


7,000 


00 


28,000 


00 


. $281,300 


00- 


$212,000 


00 


$493,300 


00 



Libraries 

* Central . . . . 
East Somerville. Branch . 
West Somerville Branch 
Prospect Hill . 



137,500 00 
24,400 00 
41.000 00 
18,000 00 



100,000 00 



6,500 00 
2,000 00 



237,500 00 
24,400 00 
47,500 00 
20,000 00 



Total .... 


. $220,900 


00 


$108,500 


00 


$329,400 00 


Miscellaneous Buildings 












Highway (stables, etc) . 


55,000 


00 


30,000 


00 


85,000 00 


Sewer .... 


6,700 


00 


500 


00 


7,200 00 


Contagious and Tuberculosis 










Hospital 


63,500 


00 


9.000 


00 


72,500 00 


City Home ... 


106,200 


00 


17,000 


00 


123,200 00 


Police .... 


70,500 


00 


8,000 


00 


78,500 00 


*City Hall 


232,500 


00 


150,000 


00 


382,500 00 


* City Hall Annex . 


68,200 


00 


12,500 


00 


80,700 00 


Parks: — 












Trum .... 


3,500 


00 






3,500 00 


Broadway 


3,100 


00 






3,100 00 


Lincoln 


3,000 
5,000 


00 
00 






3,000 00 


Bathhouse 






5,000 00 


Polling Booths 


300 


00 






300 00 


Sanitary .... 


21,000 


00 


19,200 


00 


40,200 00 


Water .... 


49,000 


00 


6,500 


00 


55,500 00 



Total $687,500 00 

* I^md included in Central Hill Park 



$252,700 00 $940,200 00 



Parks and Playgrounds 



Saxton C. Foss Park 


$421,200 00 

472,000 00 

84,500 00 

69,800 00 

109,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,100 00 

70,900 00 




$421,200 00 


Central Hill 




472,000 00 


Lincoln .... 

Prospect Hill . 

Tufts .... 


3,500 00 
1,500 00 


88,000 00 

71,300 00 

109,000 00 


Paul Revere . . 




1,000 00 


Belmont Street 




5,100 00 


Trum Playground . 




70,900 00 



76 



ANNUAL RBi'ORTS 



Glen Street 

Kent Street 

Poplar Street 

Beacon Street 

Dilboy Field 

Ward Six . 

Walter Ernest Shaw Playsr'd 

Total . 



Miscellaneous Land 

Somerville Avenue . 
Putnam 

Murdock Street 
Lowell Street . 
Spencer Avenue 
Weston Avenue 
Endicott Avenue 
Waltham Gravel Land 
Cameron Avenue 

Total . 



Land and 

Buildings 

17,300 00 
12,000 00 
5.800 00 
3.000 00 
64.000 00 
42,700 00 
54,500 00 



Personal 



Totals 



17.300 
12,000 
5,800 
3,000 
64,000 
42.700 
54.500 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



$1,432,800 00 

300 00 


$5,000 00 $1,437,800 00 
300 00 


400 00 


400 00 


600 00 


600 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


2.100 00 


2.100 00 


700 00 


700 00 


10,000 00 


10.000 00 


1,000 00 


1.000 00 







$15,300 00 



$15,300 00 



School Buildings 
Fire Buildings 
Libraries 

Miscellaneous Buildings 
Parks and Playgrounds 
Miscellaneous Land 



Total 
Sewer ( cost ) 
Water Works 



(cost) 



Total value public prop- 
erty 



SUMMARY 

Land and 
Buildings 

. $3,026,600 00 
2S1.300 00 
220.900 00 
687.500 00 

. 1.432.800 00 
15,300 00 


Pei-sonal 

$169,600 00 

212.000 00 

108,500 00 

252.700 00 

5,000 00 


Totals 

$3,196,200 00 

493,300 00 

329,400 00 

940,200 00 

1.437,800 00 

15,300 00 









. $5,664,400 00 $747,800 



00 $6,412,200 00 
1,389.305 00 
1.187.814 96 



$8,989,319 96 



TREASURER ANr> COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 77 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF 

TAXES 



Somerville, Mass. 

January 15, 1925. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 

the City of Sonierville: 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present the annual report of the City Treas- 
urer and Collector of Taxes for the year 1924, and desire to 
again call particular attention to the large amount appro-, 
priated from revenue for permanent improvements, viz $297,- 
887.37) (see statement of Revenue and Expense) and to the 
fsmall per cent of Funded Debt, and the small per capita debt, 
(see statement of Borrowing Capacity.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph S. Pikb^ 
City Treasurer and Collector of Tawes. 



ANNUAL REl'ORTS 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE 

Excess and Deficiency Credit Bal. Jan. 1 
By adjustment credits . . . . 



To adjustment charges 



AND EXPENSE 

1924 



$90,449 86 
595 01 

91.044 87 
460 15 



Assessed in Taxes, 1924 
Excise Taxes 

Estimated Revenue (net) 
Corporation Taxes 
Income Taxes 
National Bank Tax 

Premium on Bonds 
Accrued Interest 



Reserve Fund, Surplus from Overlays 
From Supplementary Warrants prior 

years 

Refund, Grade Crossing Interest 
Refund account Coal .... 
Visiting Nursing Assn. 



General Expenses 

Interest 

Reduction Funded Debt 

Met. Water Asst. 

State Tax 

State Assessments 

County Tax 



Appropriated to Outlays for Permanent 
Improvements ..... 

Balance to the credit of Excess and Defi- 
ciency account. December 31, 1924 . . 





.'^90.584 


72 


$2,882,616 91 






30 27 








2,882.647 


18 






582,443 


91 


113,497 01 






202,580 54 






2,850 56 








318,928 


11 


3,343 50 


428 82 








3.772 


32 






6.000 


00 




532 


36 


2.586 2S 






698 99 






500 00 








3,785 


27 






$3,888,693 


87 


$2,639,700 12 






107.907 30 






164.500 00 






142.275 86 






162,100 00 






187.450 82 






128,995 57 








3,532,929 


67 






297 887 


37 




57,876 


83 




$3,888,693 


87 



BORROWING CAPACITY, DECEMBER 31, 1924 



Valuation. 1922 
Supplementary 

Valuation, 1923 
Supplementary 



,158,139 27 
8,400 00 



92,519,400 00 
9,000 00 



$88,166,539 27 



92,528,400 00 



Carried forward . 



$180,694,939 27 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 79 



Brought forward $180,694,939 27 

99,317,500 00 



Valuation, 1924 99,311,000 00 

Supplementary 6,500 00 



Total $280,012,439 27 

Abatements 1922 500,867 00 



1923 472,012 00 

1924 401,450 00 



1,374,329 00 



$278,638,110 27 
Average three years, one-third . , . 92,879,370 09 

Two and one-half per cent . . . 2,321,984 25 

Funded Debt, Dec. 31, 1924 . . . 1,579,000 00 
Sewer Loan, 1895, Chap. 357 $3,000 

Met. Park Asst. Loan 1902, 

Chap. 325 .... 5,000 

8.000 00 



1,571,000 00 

Borrowing capacity Dec. 31, 1924 . 750,984 25 

Maturities: 

January 1, 1925 33,000 00 

April 1, 1925 65,000 00 

July 1, 1925 . . . $32,000 00 
Less outside limit . . 4*000 00 

28,000 00 



October 1, 1925. ..... 21,000 00 147,000 00 



$897,984 25 



Maturities within limit 1925 . . 147,000 00 

Maturities outside limit 1925 . . 4,000 00 



$151,000 00 



J/er cent of Funded Debt Dec. 31; 1924 to average valua- 
tion three years as above .017 

Estimated population Dec. 31, 1924, 100,000.. Per capita 
debt, 115.79 

CONDENSED CASH STATEMENT 

Receipts Payments 

Revenue . . $5,985,725 04 $5,503,439 39 

Non-Revenue . 46,964 57 510,496 40 



$6,032,689 61 $6,013,935 79 

Cash Balance Cash Balance 

Jan. 1, 1924 . 317,456 94 Dec. 31, 1924 . 336,210 76 



$6,350,146 55 $6,350,146 55 



80 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



DETAILED CASH STATEMENT 
RECEIPTS 



Balance from 1923 
Taxes 1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

Excise 1923 
1924 

Street Sprinkling 1923 
1924 



Highway Assessments 1921 

1923 
1924 

Apportioned 

Committed Interest . 

Sidewalk Assessments 1921 

1923 
1924 

Sewer Assessments 1923 
1924 

Metered Water Charges 1923 
Water Sales 1924 . 

Maintenance 

Services 

Treasury Department : 
Costs: Taxes 

Assessments . 

Tax Titles . 
Tax Lien Certificates 
Redemption Certificates . 

Departmental Accounts . 
Departmental Deposits . 



Interest: 

Taxes 

Assessments 

Tax Titles . 
Bank Treasurer 

City Clerk 



$262 65 

33 66 

405 34 

580,835 02 

2,471,789 39 

12 34 
12 01 

7,883 22 
38,541 24 



$3,053,326 06 



24 35 







46,424 


46 


63 


00 






11,060 


81 






9,010 


00 






62 


35 






17 


82 










20,213 


98 






19 


82 






2,483 


86 






2,099 


49 










4,603 


17 






1,506 


30 






1,759 


75 










3,266 


05 






35,208 


83 






251,339 


46 


• 




10,694 


44 






8,559 


72 










305,802 


45 






$4,886 


20 






33 


70 






13 


20 






894 


00 






20 


00 










$5,847 


10 






93,467 


27 






12,340 


48 










105,807 


75 






.16,227 


45 






264 


77 






42 


00 






10,532 


32 






19 


40 










27,085 


94 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Corporation Taxes . . 113,503 01 
Bank Taxes . . . 2,925 25 

Street Railway Taxes . 16,202 84 



$317,456 94 



132,631 10 



Carried forward 



$3,705,032 41 $317,456 94 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



81 



Brought forward 
Income Taxes: 



$3,705,032 41 $317,456 94 



1920 & prior years . 


794 


22 






1921 


1,577 


70 






1922 


1,458 


90 






1923 


10,536 


50 






- 1924 


188,213 


22 


202,580 


54 








For Schools: 










Continuation 


5,795 


30 






Vocational . . 


13,615 


67 






Americanization 


3,861 


53 


23,272 


50 








Boxing Licenses 






208 


28 


Soldiers' Benefits 






8,861 


17 


Poll Taxes 






1,965 


00 


Lieu Taxes 






86 


99 


Surplus War Bonus Fund 






46,598 


06 


County of Middlesex: 










Dog Licenses 






2,145 


27 


Courts. Police . 


13,428 


49 






County 


943 


50 






Probation Officer 


28 


75 


14,400 


74 








Departmental Penalties: 










School Department . 






311 


50 


Licenses & Permits 






17,208 


00 


Liquor for Commonwealth 






6 


eo 


Tax Titles 






515 


72 


Miscellaneous Revenue: 










Edison Electric Illumi 










nating Company, elec- 










trolysis . 


500 


00 






Conscience Money 


40 


00 






Entailing Pay Roll Items 


28 


98 






Costs Suit . 


20 


42 


$589 


40 








Sale of Land: 










Murdock Street 


600 


00 






Waltham 


312 


00 






Marion Street (Tax Title) 


175 


68 


1,087 


68 








General Expense (Refunds) . 






1,515 


62 


Revenue Loans . 






1,950,000 


00 


Trust Funds: 










School: Cutler 


214 


50 






Smith-Hughes 


2,802 


51 






Baker 


13 


50 


$3,030 


51 








Library: Cutler 


42 


88 






Hunt Art 


97 


50 






Hunt Books . 


495 


30 






Pitman, Art . 


171 


32 






Pitman, Poetry 


42 


82 






Wilder 


'4 


50 






Hunt, Art for expense 


1,000 


00 


1,854 


32 









Carried forward 



$5,981,269 71 $317,456 94 



S2 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Welfare: Cummings 
Excess & Deficiency 



Commonwealth of Mass., Re- 
fund Grade Crossing Int. 

Somerville Coal Co., Refund 
Coal . . . . 

Somerville Visiting Nursing 
Asso. .... 



Non-Revenue 

Offset to Outlays . 

Redemption Tax Titles 



1,981.269 71 $317,456 94 



Revenue 

Refunds : 

Taxes 1922 

1928 

\ 1924 



75 
595 


05 
01 


$5,981,939 


77 


2,586 


28 


698 


99 


500 


00 


$5,985,725 


04 


44,294 32 
2,670 25 


57 

tC A'JO COO iJI 


^D,yD4 




^D,i;o.i,ooy t)L 




$6,350,146 55 



PAYMENTS 

$80 16 
156 30 
319 96 



Street Sprinkling. 1924 . 
Corporation ( Commonwealth) 
National Bank (Common- 
wealth) 
Bills Receivable 
Water prior years . 
Water Income 1924 . 
^ater Maintenance 



Highway Assessments 1921 






Sidewalk Assessments 1921 






Court Judgments 






Grade Crossings 






Tax Titles 






Revenue Loans 






General Expenses . 


2,652,345 


88 


Interest Funded Debt 


68,266 


25 


Revenue Loans 


39,610 


16 


Tax Title . 


30 


89 


Reduction Funded Debt . 


164,500 


00 


Metropolitan Water Assess 






ment 


142,275 


86 


Commonwealth of Massachu 






setts: 






State Tax 


162,100 


00 


Assessments 


187,197 


56 


Soldiers' Exemptions . 


253 


26 


War Poll Tax 


522 


00 


Liquor Licenses . 


5 


75 



1 80 

586 11 

6 50 



$556 42 


51 


48 


6 


00 


74 


69 


35 


00 


594 


41 


63 


00 


19 


82 


1,136 


37 


50 


00 


257 


39 


1,950,000 


00 



3,067,029 04 



350,078 57 



Carried forward 



$5,369,952 19 



TRBASURBE AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



83 



Brought forward 



$5,369,952 19 



County of Middlesex, 


county 






tax 


. 




128,995 57 


Trust Funds; 








School: Cutler 




394 22 




Smith-Hughes 




2,635 29 




Baker 


• 


17 68 


$3,047 19 


Library: Cutler 


. ~ 


37 87 


Hunt, Art . 


. 


134 70 




Hunt, Books 


. 


501 06 




Pitman, Art 


, 


6 81 




Hunt Art for Expenses . 


758 00 










1,438 44 












— 


4 AQV: R •> 




tytOD Ot> 


Excess & Deficiency 






6 00 




$5,503,439 39 



Non-Revenue 

Outlay Appropriations 

Redemption Tax Titles 



$507,826 15 
2,670 25 



$510,496 40 













$6,013,935 79 


Cash in office . . 


1,777 


06 








Deposits in banks . 


334,433 


70 






336,210 76 










$6,350,146 55 


BALANCES, 


DECEMBER 


31, 1924 












Debit 




Credit 


Cash ..... 






$336,210 


76 




Cash Advances 






200 


00 




Taxes, 1921 .... 


$12 


44 








1922 .... 


50 


60 








1923 .... 


785 


08 








1924 .... 


427,097 


20 








Excise, 1924 .... 


18 


26 


427,963 
7,107 


58 
00 




Street Sprinkling, 1924 








Overlay & Abatement, 1921 










$12 44 


1922 










50 60 


1923 










785 08 


1924 










15,421 17 


Supplementary Assessments . 










545 55 


Highway Assessments, 1924 . 


8,869 


00 








Highway Apportioned 


302 


15 








Sidewalks Assessments, 1924 . 


2,104 


16 








Sewer Assessments, 1924 


1,655 


00 


12,930 


31 












Metered Water Charges, 1924 






32,372 


17 




Sale of Land .... 










737 68 


Comm. of Mass. Soldiers' 












Benefits .... 






8,358 


25 




Surplus War Bonus Fund 










46,598 06 



Carried forward 



$825,142 07 $64,150 58 



84 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Brought forward 

Grade Crossings 
Tax Titles 
Temporary Loans 
Funded Debt 
Net Funded Debt (Balancing 
Acc't) .... 

Comm. of Mass. Liquor Licenses 
Outlay Appropriations 
Trust Funds: 

School: Cutler 
' ' Smith-Hughes 
■ ^ Baker .... 

' Library: Cutler 

Hunt Art .... 

Hunt, Books 

Pitman, Art 

Pitman, Poetry 

Wilder 

Hunt art Expenses . 

Poor, Cummlngs 

Sundry Persons 

Excess & Deficiency 

Reserve Fund (Surplus from 

Overlay ) ... 

Special Assessments Reserved 
Public Trust Funds: 
School: 

Cutler fund 

Baker .... 



Library: 
Cutler 

Hunt Books 
Hunt Art . 
Pitman Art 80% 
Pitman Poetry 20% 
Wilder 

Welfare: 

Cummlngs Fund 
Investment 



Debit 
$825,142 07 

477 30 
1,402 80 



1,579,000 00 



$445 13 
361 82 

6 75 



5 


21 


65 


31 


5 


36 


210 


10 


51 


89 


13 


29 


299 


77 



Credit 
$64,150 58 



600,000 00 
1,579,000 00 



25 
75,417 19 



813 70 



650 93 
507 27 
291 65 

57,876 83 

14,383,46 
12,930 31 



$5,000 00 
300 00 






5,300 00 


1,000 00 

12,000 00 

1,000 00 






5,314 58 
100 00 






19,414 58 






$26,396 


24 


1,681 66 



$2,432,418 41 $2,432,418 41 

The assessoi'^s warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon 
polls and property April 1, 1924, amounted to |2,956,311.60.. 



Real Estate: 
Land 
Buildings 



Personal 



Total Valuation 



$26,353,550 00 
64,015,350 00 

90,368,900 00 
8.942,100 00 

199,311,000 00 



TKEASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 85 

At a rate of $28.70 . . .^ $2,850,225 70 

Polls, 30,094 at $2,00 . . 60,188 00 

Street Sprinkling: ... 45,897 90 



$2,956,311 60 
Additional Assessments: . 

Personal $6,500 at $28.70 . $186 55 

Polls, 171 at $2.00 . . 342 00 

Excise .... 30 27 

558 82 



Total commitment by assessors $2,956,870 42 



86 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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87 



STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS 



Balance Dec. 31. 1923 

(Committed 

Refunds 

Total charges 
Collected 
Abated 

Total credits 
Balance Dec. 31, 1924 



1923 
$7,897 22 



$7,897 22 

7,883 22 

14 70 

$7,897 92 



1»24 

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51 48 

$45,949 38 

38,541 24 

301 14 

$38,842 38 

7,107 00 



S8 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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TREASURER AND COTiLECTOR OV TAXES. 



91 



REVENUE LOANS 



In anticipation of Revenue 



Eialance from 1923 



Borrowed by authority of au order of the 
Board of Aldermen on city notes, as 
follows : 

Nos. 



1167-1172 244 days 


@ 3.96 disct 


$200,000 00 


1173-1196 229 " 


4.03 " 


500,000 00 


1197-1212 






1215-1218 196 " 


4.00 " 


300,000 00 


1219-1224 168 " 


3.50 " 


150,000 00 


1225-1228 182 " 


3.00 " 


200,000 00 


1229-1230 197 " 


2.39 " 


100,000 00 


1231-1232 223 " 


2.39 " 


100,000 00 


1233-1234 251 " 


2.39 " 


100,000 00 


1235-1236 258 " 


2.34 " 


100,000 00 


1237-1238 288 " 


2.34 " 


100,000 00 


1239-1240 173 " 


2.82 " 


100,000 00 



Paid notes maturing in 1924 . 

Maturing- in 1925 . . 
Amount paid for discount on amount 

borrowed in 1924 

Notes average 216 150-195 days and the 

average rate . . . 3.38 — 

Average for 1923, 200 135-185 days and 

average rate . . . 4.07 -f 



$39,610 16 



$600,000 00 



1,950,000 00 

$2,550,000 00 

1,950,000 00 

$600,000 00 



The funded debt Deember 31, 1924, was |1,579,000 00 
classitied as follows : 



Met. Park Asst. Loan at dV2 per cent 

Lowell Street Bridge at 3% per cent 

Sewer at SV2 per cent 

Sewer at 4 per cent . 

Sewer at 4^4 per cent 

City at 314 per cent . 

City at 4 per cent 

Highway at 3^^ per cent 

Highway at 4 per cent 

Highway at 4^/^ per cent 

Highway at 5 per cent 

City Hall Addition at 4 per cent 

City Hall Addition at 4^/4 per cent 

Public Building at 4 per cent . 

Public Building at 4^^ per cent 

Schoolhouse at 4 per cent . 



$5,000 


00 


25,000 


00 


38,000 


00 


90,000 


00 


19,000 


00 


8,000 


00 


122,000 


00 


14,000 


00 


56,000 


00 


20,000 


00 


65,000 


00 


72,000 


00 


70,000 


00 


120,000 


00 


55,000 


00 


800,000 


00 



92 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Funded debt within the limit fixed bv law 



Lowell Street Bridge 

Sewer 

City 

Highway 

City Hall Addition 

Public Building , 

Schoolhouse 



$25,000 00 

144,000 00 

130,000 00 

155,000 00 

142,000 00 

175,000 00 

800.000 00 



$1,571,000 00 



Beyond limit fixed by law 

Sewer (Chap. 357, Acts 1895) . . . $3,000 00 

Met. Park Asst. (Chap. 325, Acts 1902) . 5,000 00 



$8,000 00 
$1,579,000 00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



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94 



ANNUAL REI*ORTS 



BONDS DUE IN 1925 



Met. Park . 
Lowell Street 

Bridge 
Sewer . 
City 

Highway 
City Hall 

Addition 
Public Bldg. 
Schoolhouse 



January 



$3,000 
2,000 
8.000 



5,000 
15,000 



00 

00 
00 



00 
00 



April 



$1,000 

9,000 

14,000 

25.000 



5,000 
17,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 



00 
00 



July 
$1,000 00 



8,000 
7,000 
2.000 



00 
00 
00 



8,000 00 



October Total 
$1,000 00 

1,000 00 

20,000 00 

23,000 00 

35,000 00 

$8,000 00 8,000 00 

18,000 00 

13,000 00 45,000 00 



$33,000 00 $71,000 00 $26,000 00 $21,000 00 $151,000 00 



BOND INTEREST DUE IN 1925 



Met. Park . 
Lowell Street 

Bridge 
Sewer . 
City 

Highway 
City Hall 

Addition 
Public Bldg. 
Schoolhouse 



January 
$87 50 



550 00 
1,440 00 
?.'>^ 00 



6ZQ 



2,677 50 
5,700 00 



April 



$437 50 

2,318 75 

1,140 00 

3,115 00 

2,927 50 

960 00 

10,300 00 



July 
$87 50 



495 00 

1.400 00 

185 00 



2,577 50 
5,400 00 



October 



$420 00 

2.142 50 

870 00 

2,555 00 

2,927 50 

860 00 

9,960 00 



Total 

$175 00 

857 50 

5,506 25 

4,850 00 

6,180 00 

5,855 00 

7,075 00 

31,360 00 



$10,780 00 $21,198 75 $10,145 00 $19,735 00 $61,858 75 



BONDS OUTSTANDING DECEMBER 31, 1924 
With Interest to Maturity 





Bonds 


Interest 


Total 


Metropolitan Park 


$5,000 00 


$525 00 


$5,525 00 


Lowell Street Bridge 


25,000 00 


10,937 50 


35,937 50 


Sewer 


147,000 00 


35,151 25 


182,151 25 


City .... 


130,000 00 


18,930 00 


148,930 00 


Highway 


155,000 00 


20,570 00 


175,570 00 


City Hall Addition 


142,000 00 


57,537 50 


199,537 50 


Public Bldg. 


175,000 00 


40,850 00 


215,850 00 


Schoolhouse 


800.000 00 


295,680 00 


1,095,680 00 



$1,579,000 00 $480,181 25 $2,059,181 25 



TliKASUKKR AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



95 



YEARLY BOND MATURITIES WITH INTEREST 

Date Due J'rincipal Interest Total 

1925 $151,000 00 $61,858 75 $212,858 75 

1926 137,000 00 55,973 75 192,973 75 

1927 127,000 00 50,516 25 177,516 25 

1928 118,000 00 45,463 75 163,463 75 

1929 116,000 00 40,651 25 156,651 25 

1930 109.000 00 36,006 25 145,006 25 

1931 100,000 00 31,748 75 131,748 75 

1932 90,000 00 27,901 25 117,901 25 

1933 74,000 00 24,453 75 98,453 75 

1934 - 73,000 00 21.486 25 94,486 25 

1935 66,000 00 18,641 25 84,641 25 

1936 61,000 00 16,073 75 77,073 75 

1937 61,000 00 13,603 75 74,603 75 

1938 55,000 00 11,173 75 66,173 75 

1939 54,000 00 8,983 75 62,983 75 

1940 53,000 00 6.831 25 59,831 25 

1941 52,000 00 4,716 25 56,716 25 

1942 52,000 00 2,621 25 54,621 25 

1943 24,000 00 846 25 24,846 25 

1944 1.000 00 192 50 1,192 50 

1945 1,000 00 157 50 1,157 50 

1946 1,000 00 122 50 1.122 50 

1947 1,000 00 87 50 1,087 50 

1948 1,000 00 52 50 1,052 50 

1949 1,000 00 17 50 1,017 50 

$1,579,000 00 $480,181 25 $2,059,181 25 



MEMORANDUM OF PAYMENTS IN 1924 ON ACCOUNT OF DEBT 



Bonds, General City Debt 
Revenne Loans . 



Principal 
$161,156 50A 



Interest Total 

$67,837 43B $228,993 93 
39,610 16 39,610 16 



On account of 
Metropolitan District Debt 



Sewers 


24,828 21 


29,924 89 


54,753 10 


Park 


3,602 35 


14,928 29 


18,530 64 


Wellington Bridge 


1,265 00 


75 90 


1,340 90 


Charles River Basin 


310 09 


3,588 64 


3,898 73 


Alewife Brook 


818 39 


207 69 


1,026 08 


Water 


14,656 40 


85,035 59 


99,691 99 



Somerville's proportion 
for debt requirements: 

In State Tax . . . 
In County Tax . 



17,958 51 
4,283 66 



23,909 75 
4,656 15 



41,868 26 
8,939 81 



$228,879 11 $269,774 49 $498,653 60 



A. $3,343.50 premium applied as a deduction. 

B. $428.82 accrued interest applied as a deduction. 



96 



ANNUAL RErORTS 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 1924 



Appropriated in budget 


. 




$25,000 00 


Salaries and 'Wages: 








Treasurer and Collector 


$4,000 


00 




Deputy Collector .... 


2,200 


00 




Cashiers . . . , " . 


2,772 


29 




Clerks . . . . 


10,118 


05 




Other Expenses: 








Books, postage and supplies . 


2,929 


55 




Printing ..... 


947 


08 




Telephone 


155 


68 




Bonds 


60S 


16 




Carfares ..... 


13 


40 




All other 


71 


92 




Special Items: 








Adding machine .... 


330 


26 




Check protector .... 


39 


20 




• Time lock and repairing safe 


22 


70 




Convention expenses 


34 


90 




Tracing addresses . 


215 


00 




Advertising and recording tax sale 


I . 231 


88 




Repairing machines 


31 


98 




News Bureau ..... 


18 


00 






$24,740 


05 




Balance . . . . . 


259 


95 


$25,000 00 









VV^iAC LIBRARY. 9T 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

« Thomas M. Durell, M. D., President, 1925 

J. Frank Wellingion, Vice-President, 1926 
William L. Barber, 1925 Giles W. Bryant, M. D., 1927 

Herbert E. Buffum, M. D., 1926 Prank M. Barnard, 1926 
Albert L. Haskell, 1925 Leon M. Conwell, 1924 

George E. Wiiitaker, 1927 



COMMITTEES 

On Administration 
The President, Messrs. Wellington, Buffum, Haskell and Conwell 

On Books and Cataloguing 
The President, Messrs. Barber, Bryant, Barnard and Whitaker 

On BuMidings and Property 
The President and the Vice-President 



SECRETARY OF THE BOARD 

George H. Evans 



S8 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY AND STAFF PERSONNEL 

George Hill Evans, Librarian 

Nellie M. Whipple. Assistant Librarian 

Vivian J. Morse. Executive Assistant 



CENTRAL LIBRARY AND LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE 

Highland Avenue and Walnut Street 

GRADED SERVICE 

Department Heads and Special Positions 
CoBA B. Eames, Reference Librarian and Second Assistant 

, Supervisor of Children's Work 

Katherine E. Hunt. Chief Cataloguer 

Mary S. Woodman, Reviewer and Classifier 

Myrtle Nicholson. Desk Chief 

Marion J. Meserve, School Librarian 

Mildred A. Bowley. Supervisor of Periodicals and Binding 

, Reference Assistant 

, Children's Librarian 

-Helen W. Farrar. Assistant Cataloguer 

Senior Assistants • 

-Alice W. Hamilton, Children's Room 

E. Marion Akerley, Circulation Department 
-Dorothy C. Emerson, Circulation Department 

Elsie G. Umpleby, Reference Department 
;.Maurene Chenov^'eth, Catalogue Department 

Ungraded Service 

JVIargaret M. Collins, Page Unetta Quinn, Page 

Robert W. Rounds. Page 

Attendants on Part Time 
Kermit Kearley George Robbins 

Basil R. Mills 

WEST SOMERVILLE BRANCH 

Established 1909 
40 College Avenue 

Graded Service 

Esther M. Mayhew, Branch Librarian 
Desier C. Moulton, 1st Assistant 
, Children's Librarian 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 99 



Senior Assistants 

Ikma p. Traphagen, Circulation Department 
Decima I. Doyle. Circulation Department 



Junior Assistants 
Miriam G. Howard. Children's Room 

UNGRADED SERVICE 

Attendants on Part Time 

Beatrice M. Kenny Mildred F. Moses 

Helen C. Lowe Gordon Clive 

Stafford Hutchinson 

EAST SOMERVILLE BRANCH 

Established 1912 
Broadway and Illinois Avenue 

GRADED SERVICE 

Mabel E, Bunker, Branch Librarian (on leave) 
Elsie K. Wells, Acting Branch Librarian 
Dorothy H. Terry, 1st Assistant 
Edna L. Hartwell, Children's Librarian 

Junior Assistants 
C. Evelyn Bamford, Circulation Department 

UNGRADED SERVICE 

Attendants on Part Time 

Edna Thompson Gerald Fuchs 

Isabel Cheney Pauline Baptist a 

Eleanor Binford Gertrude McGlinchey 

UNION SQUARE BRANCH 

Established 1912 

Washington Street and Bonner Avenue 

Graded Service 

Alice G. Worthen, Branch Librarian 

, 1st Assistant 

Katherine I. Batoi^, Children's Librarian 



100 ANNUAL RErORTS 

Senior Assistants 
Elsie L. Knox, Circulation Department 

Junior Assistants 
Margaret Wentworth, Circulation Department 

UNGRADED SERVICE 

Attendants on Part Time 

Charles Kelley Nona Kelley 

Dorothy W. Crosby M. Abby Hall 

Miriam P. Brown John C. Myles 



MEMBERS OF THE TRAINING CLASS 

Frances Brown Helen L. Hosmer Angela Q. Marchesk 

Hilda O. Eastman Ethel B. Lewis Irene Smith 

NOTE: — For changes In staff personnel during year see Librarian's report. 



PUBLIC LHJRARY. 10 



Report of the Trustee 



To the Honorable, the Mayor^ and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Soinerville : 

Gentlemen: The fifty-second annual report of the trus- 
tees of the public library is herewith respectfully submitted; 
being the report of the librarian and tables of statistics of 
operation for the year, 1924. 

Very respectfully, 

The Board of Trustees, by, 

Thomas M. Durell_, 

President. 



102 ANNUAL RErORTS 



REPORT OF THE UBRARIAN 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

The fifty-second annual report of the Somerville Public 
Library, being tliat for the year 19*24, is herewith submitted. 

The outstanding feature of tlie year is the completion of 
-the interior of the Central building l)y the mural decoration 
of the main hall and entrance. In the report of last year 
attention was called to the long postponement of this work. 
It is a gre^it satisfaction, therefore, to state that it has now 
been done in a manner both technically excellent and artisti- 
cally notable. The citizens of Somerville have every reason 
for pride in the present appearance of their central library 
building. For beauty and utility it is jirobably unsurpassed, 
and perhaps not equaled, in any city of our class. A detailed 
description was pul)lished in the Reader's Mentor section of 
the May Bulletin, and it is proposed to reprint this with ad- 
ditions as a separate leaflet for general distribution. It may 
be proper, however, to include in this report a brief descrip- 
tion as a nuitter of formal record, and for the benefit of our 
numerous exchanges. 

The outstanding architectural feature oT our building 
the Parthenon frieze, extending around the top of the clere- 
story, determined the motif of the decorative design. The 
frieze is a reproduction in actual size of a portion of the fa- 
mous original. The opportunity was obvious to carry out in 
color as well as in form an actual, historical reproduction, 
an idea in accord with the educational aims of the library. 
The artist made a careful study of the color reproduction in 
the Metropolitan Museum of New York, and has followed that 
nu>del. The walls have been kept in harmony by the adoption 
of the Grecian design found in a room of a building excavated 
in the village of Bosco Reale near Pompeii. Other architec- 
tural featui'es have been treated in the same manner. The 
work was done by the P. Holdensen Co. of Boston at an 
expense of -fG.TGS. of which -sr;,007 was provided by the de- 
paitment of Public Buildings, and -^758. from trust funds 
left to the library for art ])urposes. Advantage was taken 
of this opportunity to move the Sam Walter Foss memorial 
tablet from its former somewhat secluded position to a more * 
prominent and better lighted one in the vestibule at the foot 
of the main entrance stairway, where it is now the first thing 
that greets the eye of a visitor to the library. 

Granolithic walks from Highland Ave., and from Med- 
ford St. have been laid during the summer by the Park depart- 



rUBT^IC LIBRARY. lOo 

iiient, and the grounds have been ruither enibellislied by the 
planting of barberry hedges. 

Much needed repairs have been made to the building and 
grounds of the East Sonierville Branch. The boisterous rac- 
ing of chiblren around the building undin- the windows has 
been stopped by the erection of a substantial fence. Another 
item of great importance, though appearing to the casual ob- 
server of minor interest, is the whitening of the ceiling. Any 
room that is lighted by indii-ect or semi-indirect systems is 
dependent for etliciency upon a ceiling that reflects a maximum 
of ditt'used light. It is necessary, therefore, that such ceiling 
be kept in good condition. The improvement in the light has 
been most gratifying, to the staff on account of bettered work- 
ing conditions and to the visiting readers who had begun to 
grumble about the failing light. A further need that we hope 
may be met at this branch is that of awnings for the front 
windows. The southwestern exposure produces extreme de- 
grees of heat and glare in the summer months. 

The Union Square branch is greatly in need of painting, 
both inside and out. This is in some respects one of our 
pleasantest buildings. It is spacious, amply lighted, and is 
set in a large lot shaded with ancient elms. An outside coat 
of paint of a less dingy color than at present, and the clean- 
liness that inside painting brings would add much to its natu- 
ral attractiveness. 

Painting of the outside woodwork at the West Sonierville 
branch has greatly improved the appearance of the building, 
and has stayed the rapid deterioration that had already be- 
come evident. 

On October 15 of last year the library was obliged to 
curtail its open hours in the branches on account of the num- 
ber of employees tempted awa}' by the better pay prevailing 
in other libraries, and by our inability to replace them by 
properly trained library assistants at the salaries ofl'ered. In 
January of this year a general increase averaging about ten 
per cent, was approved by the Mayor. We then began gradu- 
ally to recruit our staff'. It was a slow process, and we have had 
to be satisfied for the most part with young and under-ex- 
perienced workers. Our rehabilitation has been more evident 
in numbers than in maturity of experience. Nevertheless we 
again felt ourselves strong enough to resume full-time service 
in the branches on September 15. 

It was of course to be expected that our circulation would 
be affected by the shortened hours, and also by the presence 
of painters' staging completely filling the main hall of the 
Central library. Such was the case. West and East branches 



104 AXXrAl. KKIM>RTS 

were the worst sutlerei-s, while Central and Union Squai*e 
showed slight increases. Those interested in the actual fig- 
ures are I'efevi'ed to the tabulated statistics at the end of the 
report. 

The Librarian lias made. a study of the relative support 
of the ditVerent branches as compared with what may be 
termed their earning capacity. The i^esults are sufficiently 
enlightening for inclusion here. Fundamentally our business 
is to deal in knowledge as recorded in books. While not the 
only index of the library's usefulness in the community, the 
use of books is the closest to its purpOvSe and is the best test 
so far devised. Our survey compares the amounts allowed 
for the ]>urchase of books with the actual use of them at the 
Severn 1 l)ranches. 

West East Union 

Amount spent for books in 1928 $1,494 $1,175 $1,343 

Number of registered borrowers 4.791 2.240 2.381 

Number of books circulated . . 106.319 67.788 68.336 

Ex])resse(l in another wny ilie meaning of tlu^se figures 
beconu^s more sigiiiticunt. 

AVesi l<:ast Union 
For every book circulated tbe branch 

spent for new books ... $ .014 $ .017 $ .019 
For every borrower rej^istered the 

branch spent for new books . $ .31 $ .4v'^ $ .56 

The foregoing figures supj)ort the insistent demand of 
AVest for more books. Its earning capacity is not at present 
recogniz(^l by a tinancial snpport relatively (Mpml to that of 
the other branches. 

Changes of ]»('rs(»nnel in the staff during the year have 
been as follows : 

Ai)pointments to the (Iraded service: Katherine lil. Hunt, 
Chief Cataloger: Desier C. ^Monlton, 1st Assistant at West; 
Elsie K. Wells, Keference Assistant : Irma P. Traphagen and 
Maurene Chenoweth, S^enior Assistants; ^larjorie E. Jacot, 
Margaret AViMit worth. Elsie (}. rm]>leby. ^Mirinni (1. Howard, 
C. Evi'lyn Ham ford. Junior Assistants. 

Kesignations from the Graded vservice: (rladys B. Hast- 
ings, Supervisor of Children's Work; Xelly Cumming. Chief 
Cataloger. Corinne Alead, (Children's Librarian; (Irace N. 
Smith. Lorna W. Smith and Eleanor M. Dean, Senior Assis- 
tants; ^larjorie E. -lacot, Junior Assistant. 

Promotions in the Graded service in regular ct)urse tinder 
the provisions of the Scheme of Sei-vice; Mabel E Bunker to 
Branch Librarian at East, Corinne Mead to Keference Assis- 
tant, Elsie K. Wells to Acting Branch Librarian at Ea^t, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 105 

.Hel(»ii KMn-ai- to Assistant Catalogor, Mildred Bowley to Su- 
]>ervisor of l^eiiodicals and Hin(lin«:. Dorothy H. Terry to 1st 
Assistant at East. Alice VV. Hamilton to Children's Librarian 
at West. K. Marion Akerley and Klsie L. Knox to Senior Assis- 
tants. 

Appointments to the Ungraded Service; Margaret E. 

Soar, Kai])li II. Hatfield. Wynnette M. Alden, Margaret G. 

Walsh, Kobert A. Ronnds, Unetta Qninn and Margaret M. 
Collins eacli to the position of page. 

llesignations from the Ungraded service; Hazel M. 
Wythe, (rwendolen ])nnn. AVrnnette M. Alden and 3Iargaret 
O.' Walsh 

The Mayor's appointments to the Board of Trustees for 
the term of three years beginning 11)24 were Messrs. Giles W. 
Bryant. .M. I).. Leon M. Conwell and George E. AVhitaker. 
The last named is cordially welcomed as a new mend)er. 

During the month of May the library again exhibited 
portraits and othei* paintings l)y ]Miss Mai-guerite S. Pearson 
of :>!)(> Broadway, Scmierville, to the great pleasure of a large 
nund)er of interested visitors. 

For the information of the public we insert here the 
action of the Board of Trustees relative to tlie conditions 
under which applications of exhibitors will be considered. 

• At the regular meeting. May 6, 1924, it was 
•'Voted : That with respect to the use of the library 
buildings for exhibition purposes the policy of the Board of 
Trustees shall be governed by the following considerations: 

No exhibitions may be accepted that advertise goods for 
sale, nor that promote partisan or sectarian beliefs. 

The library will not make an initial exhibit of the work 
of any person, thereby constituting itself a judge of art, but 
it will consider the claims of one whose work has been accepted 
by a recognized institution of high standing, such as the 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, or the Art Club.'^ 

The annual training class began its work on October 
with six mend)ers, namely: Frances Brown, Hilda O. East- 
man, Helen L. Hosmer, Ethel B. Lewis, Angela Q. Marchese, 
and Iren(^ Smith. With the approval of the Mayor we have 
happily been able to employ Miss Hastings to continue her 
usual course of 24 lectures and class sessions in children's 
work. The loss of Miss Hastings as Supervisor of Children's 
Work is a very serious one. It will be difficult to till this 
vacancy with one who can bring to it an e(pial degree of 



106 ANNUAL RErORTS 

trained knowledge of the work, diligent application, and tlit^ 
qnalities of intelligent leadership which she displayed. 

The extended absence of the librarian on account of ill 
health during the sunimei- months, and just at the time when 
the work of interior decoration brought its own special prob- 
lems, subjected the library organization to a test of its efficien- 
cy. There has never been any (piestion of the loyalty and 
devotion of the start*, and the machinery of operation has now 
also demonstrated that it is capable of functioning witli i)er- 
fect smoothness when another hand is at the throttle. The 
Trustees liave placed upon record and have transmitted to 
the stall' an expression of their appreciation, and the librarian 
now takes special ])leasure in making public acknowledgment 
of the steadfast loyalty of his associates in the library service. 

Statistics of operation for 1924 are appended as a part 
of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Evans,, 

Librarian. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



107 



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108 



ANNUAL REi'QRTS 



APPENDIX B 



American Library Association Form for Uniform Statistics 

Annual report for year ended December 31. 1924 

Name of library: The Public Library of the City of Somerville, Mass. 

City: Somerville State: Massachusetts 

Name of librarian: George Hill Evans 

Date of founding .... 

Population served (latest estimate) 

Assessed valuation of city 

Rate of tax levy for library purposes 

$1,000 valuation 
Terms of use: Free for lending 
Free for reference 



1872 

100.000 

$99,311,000 00 



71 cents on each 



Total number of agencies .... 
Consisting of Central Library . 
Branches 

High School Department 
School Rooms . 
Institutions 



1 
3 
1 
172 
5 



Number of days open during year (Central Library) 
Hours open each week for lending (Central Library) 
Hours open each week for reading (Central Library) 



182 



304 

72 
72 



INCREASE 

Number of volumes at beginning of year 

Nuimber of volumes added during year by purchase 

Number of volumes added during year by gift or ex- 
change .......... 

Number of volumes added during year by binding ma- 
terial not otherwise counted . . . . . 

Number of volumes added during year by lost books 
restored 

Number of volumes lost or wit 

Total number at end of vear 



USE 

Number of volumes of fic- 
tion lent for home use 

Total number of volumes 
lent for home use 

Number of pictures, photo- 
graphs and prints lent 
for home use 



115,647 
7,690 

141 

80 



rawn dur 


ing 


year 


38 

6,473 
117.123 


Adull 




Juvenile 


Total 


197,691 




96,840 


294.531 


266.056 




174.001 


440,057 



2.702 



REGISTRATION 

Number of borrowers reg- 
istered during year . 

Total number of regis- 
tered borrowers . 

Registration period, years 



Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


4,512 


4,006 


8.518 


9,228 


7.686 


16.914 
9 



irnLic LinnAiiY. 



lOU 



Number of periodicals and newspapers currently re- 
ceived : 

Titles 

Copies ...... . . . 

Number of publications issued during year: 

Bulletins ......... 

Other 

Number of staff, library service . . . . . 

Number of staff,, janitor service 



246 

528 

S 

1 

41 



FINANCE 

Receipts from: 
City tax levy: 

Library Department 
Public Buildings Department 
Endowment Funds 
Fines . . . . . . 

Other sources (Dog licenses) . 
Total .... 

Payments for: 

Library Department: 

Books 

Periodicals .... 
Pictures .... 

Music ..... 

Binding 

Salaries, library service 

Supplies 

Printing .... 

Telephone .... 
Transportation, postage, express 

freight, etc. 
Other maintenance 
Mural decorations 

Total .... 

Public Buildings Department: 
Salaries, janitor service 

Heat 

Light 

Furniture .... 
Permanent improvements 
Other maintenance 

Total .... 

Total maintenance 
Balance from Appropriation, Library Dept 
Balance from Endowment Funds 
Balance from Appropriation, Public 
Buildings Department 

Total balance . 



$51,293 


90 




19,900 


00 




1,789 


60 




2,130 


83 




2,145 


27 


77,259 60 






$11,204 


31 




1,213 


65 




21 


47 




180 


28 




2,886 


85 




37,148 


01 




930 


09 




867 


14 




221 


01 




1,289 


34 




286 


32 




758 


00 




57,006 


47 




$7,603 


38 




2,792 


25 




2,106 


95 




194 


83 




6,168 


63 




347 


45 




$19,213 


49 


76,219 96 


$ 1 


97 




351 


16 




686 


51 


L039 64 



110 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF SANITARY DEPART^IENT 



January 17, 1925. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : 

The report of the Sanitary Department for the year 1924 
is respectfully submitted herewith. 

Collection of Ashes and Paper 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Ashes 
(Cubic Yards) 


Paper 
(Cubic Yards) 


14,885 


4,760 


13,862 


3,840 


13.044 


4,760 


13,244 


3,900 


11.231 


4,600 


8,071 


3,840 


8.210 


4,920 


6.984 


4.760 


7.294 


3,840 


9.276 


4.120 


9.772 


3.940 


14.520 


3.630 



130,393 



50.910 



During the year the Sanitary Department paid to the 
Highway Department ^3,310.13 for the use of teams and 
11,287.75 for board of horses. 

The paper and combustible materials are being disposed 
of at the incinerator plant, the city receiving a I'evemie of 
$400. per year for the paper. The garbage" is collected by 
contract, twice a week from May 15th to October 15th and 
once a week for the period from October 15th to the following 
May 15th. Ashes and non-combustible refuse are collected 
principally with automobile trucks on account of the distance 



SANITARY DKrARTMRNT. Ill 

to the (lumps used by the de])artnieiit which are located in 
Medford and subject to the rules and regulations of the Board 
of Health of the' City of Medt'ord. 

The Medford dumps are fast filling up and I recommend 
that Somerville take action in the near future to provide dump- 
ins: facilities for its refuse. 



't> 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edgar T. Mayhew^ 

Supt. of Sanitary Dept. 



112 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF SOMERVILLE PLANNING BOARD 



December 31, 1924. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen. 

Gentlemen : 

As required by tbe provisions of Chapter 494: of the Acts 
of 1913 tbe Planning Board lierewitli submits its annual re- 
port, together witli recommendations for the year 1925, aa 
herein contained. 

Organization 

The Planning Board met and organized for the j^ear 1924^ 
the following mend)ers being present ; John AVilliamson, 
George J. Rauh, Benjamin J. Surett and David J. Kelley. 
The Board elected fJohn Williamson Chairman and David J. 
Kelle}^ Secretary for the ensuing year. 

Previous Recommendations 

During tlie ^'ear 1924 the Planning Board has had month- 
ly meetings, but lias been unable to go forward and complete 
it« plans already begun with ref(*rence to zoning the city for 
the reason that the city government failed to provide sufficient 
funds for that i3urpose. This was due in large measure to 
failure on the ])art of the Board of Aldermen to take any defi- 
nite action on tbe recommendations previously made by the 
Planning Board, with particular reference to two matters; 

1. The matter of establishment of fire districts, which were great- 
ly needed. 

2. The enactment of a suitable building code ordinance. 

For these reasons His Honor, the Mayor felt tbat it would 
be useless to spend more of the city's money until the Board 
of Aldermen had taken some action based upon the recommen- 
dations made by the Planning Board. 

However, at the December meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men an ordinance was enacted, establishing Fire Districts 
throughout the city, and the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
are to be commended for this first step, which will provide 
future fire protection to our city, and in time will bring about 



I'LAWIXc; ItOAKl). llo 

a reduction in the higli rate now paid for tire insurance pre-- 
miums. 

No action lias been taken in reference to tlie building 
code submitted by the Plannin<j^ Board for approval by the- 
Board of Aldermen. 

In addition to the recommendations above mentioned, the 
Planning Board has also previously made the following recom-' 
mendations : 

a. Establishment of playgrounds in different sections of the city. 

b. Mystic River Development. 

c. Survey of the city, with special reference to information on 
real estate assessments. 

d. Enactment of a zoning ordinance. 



Playgrounds 

During the year 15)24 the city government lias taken. 
action in one section of the city by purchasing an area in 
AVard (i for playground development, but there are other sec- 
tions of the city still needing service, as shown on the Plan- 
ning Board plans in its office at City Hall. The Planning 
Board would be very glad to cooperate with a committee from 
the Board of Aldermen in reference to selecting suitable sites 
for playgrounds in ditterent sections of the cit}^ in accordance 
with information already available, so that the most desirable 
sites can be selected, which will give accommodations to the 
greatest number of children. 



Mystic River Development 

During the year there has also been a change in reference 
to the Mystic River, and plans are now under way for the* 
development of land bordering on the river, which will mean 
additional taxable property, for the City of Somerville, and 
also additional responsibilities and expenses in connection 
with the development which is about to take place. The- 
Planning Board again urges upon the city government the 
necessity of taking some land on the river front to be utilized' 
as a wharf by the city, before any new buildings or other de- 
velopment has taken place which would increase the damages 
to be paid for the taking. 



SuTvey of the City 

Nothing has as yet been done on the recommendation of 
the Planning Board for a survey of the city, especially with 



1'14 ANNTTAL R'KPORTiS 

relereiice to a^sesRing (^f real estate. The CAty of Somerville 
is far beliiud the times in it^ present system of assessing real 
eatate, as the method of assessment is more or less haphazard, 
and has depended in the nature of things on the individual 
judgment of the assessor or assessors who ha\'e had tlie work 
in hand. The neighboring Citv of Cambridge has at pi*esent 
the so called block system in operation, which has the city 
blocked off into districts, and has different land variously 
assessed according to the district on a scientific plan. While 
the Planning Board does not recommend the adoption of that 
X^articular system for Somerville, it, however, again strongly 
recommends that the Board of Aldermen take some action 
towards having a scientiftc survey of the city made, and a 
plan devised and carried into effect, which will equalize the 
assevssment of real estate throughout the city, and relieve the 
])resent inequitable and unfair situation on assessment of I'eal 
estate. This observation is in no way a criticism of the pres- 
ent Board of Assessors, as the Board is of the opinion that 
it is impossi])l(' for them to do any differently, unless they 
have assistance such as is outlined above. 



Enactment of A Zoning Ordinance 

The last report of the Department of Commerce at Wash- 
ington sliows that approximately twenty-four million people 
living in two hundrecl and sixty-one municipalities through- 
out the Unite<l Jj^tates are now enjoying the benefits of zoning. 
This re])ort also shows that the greatest zoning center is in 
Xew York State, and Northern New Jersey, having the City 
of New York as its hub. In view of these facts, it is fair to 
say tliat the argument advanced against zoning by opponents 
of that measure to the effect that the City of SK)mer\'ille is 
all built up, and thickly populated, has little or no weight, 
when we realize that tJie ] daces where the zoning laws are 
being enacte<l, and are now in effect are more populous and 
more thickly built on tlian the City of Somerville. The idea 
of zoning lias made a strong appeal in many states in the 
United States, and here in Massachusetts many of our cities 
have passed zoning ordinances. We have at the present time 
twenty -four cities and towns in Massachusetts that have been 
zoned, including among them the City of Boston, City of 
Cambridge and City of Medford, all adjoining cities. The 
Town of Arlington and Town of Belmont have also passed 
zoning ordinances, so that the Citv of Somerville is surrounded 
by towns and cities that have passed zoning ordinances tliat 
are now in effect. Although the City of Somerville on April 
28, 192o employed the Technical Advisory Corporation of New 



IM.AXXIN(; HOARD. 115 

York to make a survey of this city for the purposes of furnish- 
mg iufomuition to be used later in drafting a zoning ordi- 
nance, Boston, Medford and Arlington, although they com- 
pleted their work later than Homerville, have been able to 
enact a zoning ordinance, while we are standing still, due to 
the inactivity of our Board of Aldermen. 

This information is 8till available, but if we delay much 
longer it will mean this work accomplished at great expense 
will have to be done over again. The Planning Board again 
strongly recommends that a sufficient appropriation be made 
for the completion of our zonin,g laws, and that it be done 
without further delay. 

The other objection that was nuide to the zoning law 
w'as that it had not been tried out, and might be illegal and 
unconstitutional. Both of these (juestions have been taken 
care of by recent decisions of the Supreme Judicial Court of 
Massachusetts, in the case of S])ect(>r vs Building Inspector 
of Milton, by decision filed Oct. 18, 1924, also Building In- 
spector of Lowell vs Joseph Stokloska, tiled on the same date. 
Both of these cases passed on the legality of zoning, and also 
the constitutionality of the zoning ordinance. 

However, the court says in both cases that the zoning 
ordinance must be drafted as a result of a general, compre- 
hensive plan carried out and enacted at one time, and cover- 
ing the whole city, and not the result of haphazard or piece- 
meal legislation. The coui-t in its opinion said that the enact- 
ment of a zoning ordinance was for the purpose of safeguard- 
ing the owners of homes within residential districts, and 
prevent the destruction of residential neighborhoods, so that 
the owners of the land in that area will not by their actions 
Interfere with the ordinary comfort that should be obtained 
in residential districts for the health, safety and welfare of 
the public. The ordinance can also provide that districts can 
be changed from time to time as circumstances and conditions 
would warrant, so tluit the future growth and development 
of the city will not be hindered by the enactment of the ordi- 
nance. 

Recommendations 

The Planning Board again urges upon the city govern- 
ment the necessity of taking action according to the following 
recommendations : 

1. A survey by a committee of the Board of Aldermen and the Plan- 
ning Board for the purpose of picking desirable sites for play- 
grounds. 



116 ANNUAL REPORTS 

2. Pending the operation of a zoning ordinance the Board of Alder- 
men should have in mind the following observations; 

a. Public garages should be confined to business and industrial 
districts. -. ■- 

b. No garage for more than five cars should have an entrance or, 
exit within two hundred feet of a playground, school or church., 
or within any residential district. 

c. No machine shop in a public garage may be operated by an- 
engine or motor of over five horse power, and no repair work 
may be done out of doors on the street side. 

d. No permits for the establishment of gasoline pumps may be 
given within twelve feet of the street line. 

e. All private garages must be kept at least three feet from the 
side lot line, and set back from the street at least on a line 
with the houses built on the street, and not be allowed to pro- 
ject out, so that their doors open on the sidewalk. 

f. There is a tendency to keep on building small stores in dif- 
ferent parts of our city, and also small industrial plants, which 
injure the neighborhood. This practice should be stopped. 

In view of these teiideiieies it caiiiiut be Too strongly 
urged that Somerville immediately undertake the enactment 
of a zoning ordinance. A properly drawn zoning ordinance 
will regulate in the public interest the use, height and location 
ol' all buildings, and will generally be benelicial to all proper- 
ty owners in the city, and for their greater comfort and pro- 
tection. 

Tax Assessments 

The Board is of the opinion that the city has outgrown 
its present system of assessing real estate, although the Somer- 
vill system is no worse than those in a majority of Massachu- 
setts cities;. Either the Planning Board or a competent 
special committee should be empowered to make a thorough 
study of methods and systems for scientifically lixing real 
estate values, and equalizing assessments, under the guide of 
specialists, and formulate plans for a new assessment s^'stem. 



Appropriations 

The Planning Board is aware that the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen are not desirous of spending the money 
of the citizens unless an ade(piate return is made therefor. 
The Planning Board, however, is of the opinion that if it ifi 
given sufticient funds to carry out its program as outlined by 
the recommendations contained in this report the citizens of 
the city will benefit by the lower taxes and greater fire pro- 
tection and increased real estate values. The recent enact- 
ment of the ordinance creating fire districts recommended in 
several planning board reports will result in time in greater 



in,Axxi.\<r p.oAUD 117 

tire protection to the citizens. This has been brought about 
in part througli the appropriation made for the Tlanning 
Board in 192.3. Jf the Mayor and city government grant the 
l*Ianning Board a suflicient appropriation this year so that 
a zoning ordinance may be enacted, it will result in a stabilis- 
ing of real estate values throughout the city. 

In order to carry out the recommendations contained in 
this report the Planning Board a«ks the cooperation of the 
city government by the appropriation of the sum of Ten thous- 
and dollars, in order that it may during the coming year 
submit a permanent zoning ordinance, and also submit a new 
code of building laws. If the recommendations contained 
herein with reference to assessment of real estate meets with 
the approval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen the Plan- 
ning Board requests that a special appropriation of Five 
thousand dollars be set apart for this purpose, so that the 
Planning Board may work together, either with the city 
government or experts, and submit a plan for a new sjnstem for 
assessment of real estate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Williamson, Ghairmwn. 

(rPJOROE J. RaUH. 

David J. Kelley_, Secretary. 



lis ANNUAL REPORTS ] 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

ORGANIZATION — 1924 

C. A. C. RiCiiAKi>soN. M. D., ChairmtM? 

Wesley M. Goff ; 

James A. Kilky. 

Executive Clerk 
Laitkenc'E S. Howard 

Assistant Clerk 
Gltvk M. Sta>-i>ey 

Agent 
Gkoiigk I. Canfjei,t> 

fMedical Inspector and Bacteriologist 
Frank L. Morse. M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 

Charles M. Berry. Y. S. , 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
Herbert E. Bowmax. Ph. G. 

Milk Collector and Dairy Inspector 
William H. Wallis 

Plumbing Inspector 
Duncan C. Greene 

School Nurses 
Grace M. Anouews. R. N. Gladys M. Grant, R. N. 

Health Nurses 

Helen B. Berry. R. N. Mary L. Scott, R. N- 

Grace E. Pickering, R. N. 

Matron at Contagious Hospital 
Lillian E. Got5ij». R. N. 



HKALTir DKFARTMRNT. TH? 

(Mc.e of the Board of Healtli, 
(My Hall' Annex, Janujiry 2, 1^925. 

To Hivs Honor, the Mayor, and tlie Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — 

We respectfully suforndt the following as tlie forty- 
seventh annual report of the Board of Health in which in 
presented a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sani- 
tary conditioni of the city and the business of the board for 
the year ending December 31, 1924;. 

Nuisances 

A recoT'd of the nuisances abated during the year, in 
compliance with notices issued by the board, or under the 
board's direction, is presented in the following table: 

Complaints referred from 1923 ... 15 

Complaints received during 1924 . . . 488 



563 

Complaints referred to 1925 .... 1 

Nuisances abated in 1924 502 



Second and third notices sent . . . . 23 

Received during 1924 503 



Total notices sent . . . . . 526 

In addition to the above, 883 dead animals have been 
removed from the public streets and private premises. Many 
nuisances have been abated on verbal notice from the agent, 
without action by the board, of which no record has been 
made. Each spring the whole city is examined, and cellars, 
yards and alleyways where rubbish and filth have collected 
are required to be cleaned. 

R-€cord of Licenses and Permits Issued 

GOATS. Eight applications were received for permits 
to keep thirteen goats, all of which were granted. The fee- 
is one dollar for each goat. 

HENS. Forty-seven applications for permits to keep' 

767 hens were received. Thirty-three to* keep five hundred 

thirty-two hens were granted and fourteen pernvits were re- 
fused. 



120 ANNUAL RE I 'OUTS. 

GREASE, Seventeen applications were received for 
permits for twenty-one teams to collect grease, which were 
granted. The fee is two dollars for each team. 

MELTING AND RENDERING. Three parties have 
been licenvsed to carry on the business of melting and render- 
ing, for which a fee of one dollar is charged. 

MASSAGE AND MANICURE. Forty-six persons have 
been licensed to practice massage and manicure. The fee is 
one dollar for each license. 

SALE OF ALCOHOL. The statutes provide that no 
person firm or corporation other than a registered druggist 
shall engage in the business of nuinufacturing, buying,, sell- 
ing or dealing in methyl alcohol, or wood alcohol so called 
or denatured alcohol, or any preparation containing more than 
three percent of any of the said alcohols, without being li- 
censed so to do by the board of health. 

Under the provisions of this act sixteen licenses have 
been issued. A fee of one dollar was received for each license. 

BOTTLING. CARBONATED BEVERAGES. Chapter 
oOo, Acts of 1921 provides that no person shall engage in the 
maiiufacture or bottling of carbonated non-alcoholic beverages, 
soda water-s and mineral and spring water without a permit 
from the board of health. Six such permits were granted, 
a fee of ten dollars being charged in each case. 



Stables 

No person has the legal right to erect, occupy or use any 
building in this city, as a stable, without obtaining a license 
from the board for such occupancy. Each application is re- 
ferred to the Agent of this board and no license is granted 
unless all regulations of the board are complied with. The 
following is a record of applications received and licenses 
granted : . 

Applications pending from 1923 . 1 

Applications received during 1924 ., - . 4 



Licen.ses granted ..... 4 

Licenses refused ..... 1 



TIKAI/rn 4)BrAllTM.EXT. 121 



Board of Infants 



Fourteen a implications having been made to the State De- 
partment ol' Public Welfare for licenses to care for children 
in this city were referred to this board under provisions of 
Chapter 11i) of the General Laws, and were approved. 

Lying-in Hospitals 

Five applications having been made to the State 
Department of Public Welfare for licenses to maintain lying- 
in-hosi>itals in this city were referred to this board under the 
provisions of Section 71 of Chapter 111 of the General Laws 
and were approved. 

There were 1)71) deaths and seventy-three stillbirths in 
the city during the year, as specified in the following table. 
This is the lowest number of deaths in any year since 1908 
when the estimated population was 75,500 which is an indica- 
tion of the healthy condition of the city : 

Deaths at Somerville Hospital .... 102 

Deaths at hospital for contagious diseases . 7 

Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland Ave.) 35 

Deaths at city home ...... 5 

Deaths at other institutions . ... . 54 



122 



ANNUAL REFOHTS 
Mortality in Somerville in 1924 



eS : 3 "T" 
5= b ^ 

09 






A- 



e9 



» 1^ 

a-' 1 ^ 

3: 3 



& 



»= : < 



t^ 




a 








^ 


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9 


^ ! 


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o 


O- 


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V 




* 


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^ 



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S5 i 



u ] J* 

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I. EriDKMic, Endkmk- and 



lA 

» 

9 
10 
IIB 
21 
■Hi 
24 

;ii 

32 

;i:5 
M 

35 

36B 

38 

41 



iNFKOnoLTS DiSKASIvS. 



Tynlioid Fev*tr ... 

Scarlet Fever 

Whooping c;;ough 

Diphtheriai 

Influenza 

Erysipelas 

Lethargic Encephaliti.< 



1 , ' n 1 

1 I i 2; 

1 1 ■ : I i a 

2 2 4 1 2 , 1 2 ■ 14 

1 1 J 1 

2 1 I ' 3- 

i 1 I 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 1 i 

Tuberculosis of Lungs 5 5 5 4-1 5 2 2 1 1 I 3 35- 



Tubercular Meningitis 

Tuberculosis of intestines: 2 1 

Tuberculosis of verterbral 

column 1 ' 

Tuberculosis of joints 1 ' 

Tuberculosis of bones 1 , 

Sj'philis I 1 2 

Septicaemia ■ 1 2 



2 



n. (JivNKUAL DiSKASFS NOT 
JNCLIUKI) AKOVK' 

43 ("a.ncer of Buccal Cavity 

44 Cancer of Stomach <k Liver 

45 Cancer of Intestines 

46 Cancer of Female Genital 

Organs 

47 (Jancer of breast 

48 Cancer of Skin 

49 ('ancer of other ( )rgans 

50 Brain Tumor 

61 Acute Rheumatic Fever 

52 Osteoarthritis 

57 Diabetes Mellitus 

58 A Pernicious Ann'mia 

63 Addisons Disease 

65A T>eukemia 

65B Ilodgkins Disease 

fif) Acute Alcoholism 

69 Other General Diseas<>s 



II L DlSKASF>; OF THK NkHVOI'S 

Systkm and Organs ok the 

Spk(;iai- Sknsk. 



1 ' 


-1 




6 


5 


2 


1 




4 


2 


3 


3 


2 




1 



71A Meningitis 

71B Non-Epidemic Cerebro- 
spinal Meningitis 

72 Tabes Dorsalis 

73 Other Diseases of the Spi- 
nal Cord 

74 A Cerebral Hemorrhage 

74B Cerebral Thrombosis 

75 Paralysis 

75A Hemiplegia 

76 General Paralysis of Insane 

80 Infantile Convulsions 

«4 Other Diseases of the Ner- 
vous System 



12 
1 



11 



11 



3. 

^» 
17 

20 
12 

1 
1* 
1 
1 
1 
7 

1 
2 
1 
8- 
3 



1 
1 

I 

9S 

6 

9 

2 
5 



IIBALTH nKPARTM ENT. 



128 



Mortality In Somervillei in 1924 — Continued 





a 


■*■. 


1 
i 

' 1 ' "^ & s 




s 1 
ill 




V 

a 

> 
o 

'A 


December. 
Total. 


IV. DiSKASKS OF THK ClRCl'I.A- 

TOKY System. 

88 Endocarditis & M y ocarditis 

89 Ansrina Pectoris 


8 


3 

1 

11 


5 

1 


7 9 8 
2 2 


9 

1 


1 


2 

1 


6 4 
4 


8 

1 
7 


70 

13 


90 f )ther Diseases of the Heart 


5 6 3 


2 


5 2 7 


4 

1 
14 


6 


67 
1 


^W) Arteriosclerosis 


11 



14 


12 


14 


i 13 


1.0 


9 . 14 13 


8 


12 
1 



...„. 

3 

...„. 


144 


92 Embolism and Thromboses 
*^4 "^tatus T vmphaticu.'* 


1 




' i"' 




1 ...... 

1 

2 


1 
? 


V. 1 )ISEA,SKS OF THB RRSPIRA- 

TOBY System. 
99A Acute Bronchitis 





1 


2 

1 










1 


5 


99B Chronic Bronchitis 

lOOA Broncho Pneumonia 

lOlA Lobar Pneumonia 

lOlB Unresolved Pneumonia 

102 . Empyemia 




Til 


3 


5 
9 


6 

2 


8 
4 


5 
10 


5 
3 


4 
3 


2 

1 


4 
5 


4 
6 

1 


54 










1 

1 










1 









1 




"''" i" 


4 


106 Asthma 


1 




1 
1 


1 




4- 


107 Others included under this 
title 

VI. DiSKASKS OF THE DiflKSTIVE 

System. 
112 Acute Indigestion 




2 
1 






2 


3 






2 


113 Diarrhea and Enteritis 
(under 2 years) 












; 2 


1 






2 


1 




114 Diarrhea and Enteritis 

(2 years and over) 

117 Appendicitis 


2 








1 








3 







1 








1 






1 
1 

1 


1 


1 

1 


5 


118A / Hernia 




1 







2 


118B Intestinal Obstruction 





1 


I 










4 


122B Cirrhosis of Liver 






1 


1 






2 


123 Biliary Calculi 












1 










1 


124 Other Diseases of the Liver 








1 










' 




1 


3 


126 Peritonitis 


1 
3 


3 


1 
3 






5 


1 

7 


. 




3 


VII. NON VKN RURAL DISEASES 
OF THK GKKITO-URINABY 

System anji Annkxa. 
129 Nephritis 


4 


3 

1 


■' 
. 


2 


1 : 


6 


6 


46 


131 Other Diseases of the Kid- 
neys 

138 Salpingitis 

VI 11. The Puerperal State 
144 Puerperal Hemorrhage ... 


2 










1 
1 






i 






1 



















'■ 






1 


145C Others under this title 










1 
1 










1 
1 


...„. 


2 


146 Puerperal Septicaemia 




















2 


148 Puerperal Albumenari a ... 












1 








4 



























124: 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Mortality In Somerville in 1924 — Continued 





3 

a 


u 

S3 • 
3 

S 
IS 




'u 
P, 




a 

3 


3 
•-> 


; 

g 

3 


s 

A 
GQ 


o 

O 

O 


t-, 

V 

s 

> 

o 


a 


"3 

■fc* 

5 


IX. J)rsKAsKS OK THE vSkIN AND 

OF THE CKi.r.rr.AK Tissues. 
1 51 Gaiii?rene 






1 


I 
1 













1 

1 

1 


1 


l5o A bs('es« 




1 


1 














1 


1 


X. Diseases of the Hones 
AM) Organs of Locomotion 

loo OsteoiTJvelitis 














1 








?. 


156 Diseases of the Joints. 




1 


1 











1 


XI. Malformations. 
159 C-oiigenital Malformation 












1 


" 






I 


159C Spina Bifida 








1 
1 










■" 


1 


XIJ. Earf.y Infancy. 
160 Congenital Debility 




2 4 

3 : 1 

3 ; 1 


1 
1 

"i" 

1 


2 
1 
3 


5 

1 
1 


1 

4 

2 


2 
2 
1 


3 
2 

""l 


1 
...„. 

1 


3 

7 


24 


161A Premature Birth 


4 


2K 


IHIP, Injury at Birth 

1 62 A sph > X i a N eon atoruni 


13 
2 


Xlll. Oi.i. A<;e. 
164 Senility 










. 1 


2 


XIV. P1\tej:naj. Causk^. 
165 Suicide by Poison 






... 
2 




1 








1 


167 Suicide by Poisonous Gas 






1 






3 


168 Suicide bv Hanging^ 


1 

...„. 



2 


' 

















I 


170 Suicide by Fire Arras 











1 


1 
.J 










2 


179 Accidental Burns 






1 
■3" 




3 


180 Accidental Suffocation 

181 Accidental Poisoning by 
Gas 


1 






■ 






1 





3 

1 


1 


185 Accidental Fall 


1 











1 


'\ 


7 


188A Railroad Accident 


1 


1 
2 
1 








? 


188r .\uto Accident 

197 Homicide by Firearms 




1 
1 




1 


2 

1 


1 


1 
1 
1 




1 


10 
<> 


201 Fracture 










? 


202 Accidental Hanging 




:::::: :::::: 






1 


i 
i 








1 


X \' . iLI -D K K J N K 1 ) ( "A US KS . 




















Total 


98 


84 


90 


91 


99 


68 


80 


57 1 
ii 


56 


82 


^''^ 


91 


979 



Population estimated 100.000 

Death rat4> per thousand .' 9.79 



HEALTH DKI'AIIT.MKNT. 



125 



DEATHS BY AGES 



Agks. 


Total. 
110 


Male. 


Female. 


Under one ....... 


62 


48 


One to two 














16 


9 


7 


Two to thre<' 














8 


'5 


.'] 


Three to five 














9 


5 


4 


Five to ten 














12 


7 


5 


Ten to fifteen 














9 


o 


4 


Fifteen to twenty 














17 


8 


9 


Twenty to thirty 














42 


17 


25 


Thirty to forty . 














44 


22 


22 


Forty to fifty . 














09 


28 


41 


Fifty to sixty 














127 


()1 


66 


Sixty to seventy 














191 


89 


102 


Seventy to eighty 














207 


79 


128 


Eiglity to ninety 














100 


?y5 


65 


Ninety and over 














18 
979 


7 


11 


Total 














439 


540 



Total Deaths During the Last Ten Years 



Tear. 

1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1023 
1924 
Average 



death rate per 1000 for ten years 



ft 


Rat* 


No. of 


per 


Deaths. 


1.00» 


1,003 


11.55 


1,081 


12.01 


1,067 


11.85 


1,533 


16.84 


1,074 


11.30 


1,137 


12.22 


986 


10.38 


1,019 


10.41 


1,108 


11.30 


979 


9.79 




ii.7e 



Table Showing the Five Principal Causes of Death in Sonnerville 

In 1924 



Pnkumonia 
All Fokms. 




Apoplexy. 



30 



95 I 






5^o 



9.50 



126 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1. 
18 
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£ 


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■< 


£ 


C 


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1 


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&. 




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3Z61 I 

1261 I 

^.61 I 

6161 I 

8161 I 

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S 



HEALTH DEI'Airi^MKNT. 127 

Diseases Dangerous to the Public Health 

This board lias adjudged that the disea.ses known as 
^rtinomycosis, anterior poliomyelitis, anthrax, Asiatic cholera, 
cerebrospinal meningitis, chicken pox, diphtlieria, dog-bite 
(requiring anti-rabic treatment), dysentery, (lerman measles, 
glanders, hookwoi-m disease, infections disease of the eye, in- 
fluenza, leprosy, malaria, measles, mumps, x^^^^^^gra, plague, 
j>neum()nia (Lobar only), rabies, scarlet fever, septic sore 
tliroat, small pox, tetanus, trichinosis, tuberculosis (all forms), 
tA7)hoid fever, typhus fever, whooping cough, yellow fever, 
are infectious or contagious and dangerous to the public 
health and safety within the meaning of the statutes. Physi- 
cians are required to report immediately to the board every 
case of either of these diseases coming under their care and 
postal cards conveniently printed and addressed are supplied 
to them for the purpose. On receipt of a card from a physi- 
cian, the principal of the school in the district in which the 
patient resides, the librarian of the public library and state 
board of health are notified. 

Specimens and Supplies ' 

Outfits for specimens to be examined for tuberculosis, 
diphtlieria and typhoid fc^ver, and diphtheria anti-toxin, vac- 
cine lymph and nitrate of silver solution may be obtained at 
the laboratory and at the folloAving places : 

Edward Edwards. 25 Union Square. 
K. A. IVckham, 154 Perkins Street. 
Richardson Pharmacy, ^)l() Broadway. 
Ernest P>. McClure, 529 Medford Street. 
George E. Wardrobe, 69:) Broadway. 
AVillis S. Furbush & Co., 1153 Broadway. 
Hall Drug Co., Hobbs Building, Davis Square. 
John Morrison. 288 Highland Avenue. 

Hereafter the Agent of this Board will collect, daily, 
at live o'clock, p. m., all specimens left at culture stations for 
examination, prior to that hour. 

Physicians desiring reports on the following day, of spec- 
imens taken after this collection has been made must deposit 
same at the City Hall, in the receptacle provided, before nine- 
thirty p. m. 

Results of all examinations of specimans received at the 
City Hall prioi* to nine-thirty p. m., will be reported to the 
physicians on the following morning. 



128 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Medical Inspection at Schools 

The medical inspection of the schools of Somerville 
which was instituted in December 1907, has been continued 
during the year. The value of the system has been constantly 
demonstrated, and the work has been done in a very satis- 
factory manner. There has been harmony of action between 
the board of health and the school board, and the school prin- 
cipals and teachers have very generally co-operated with the 
inspectors in making the system as successful as possible. 

The ins])ectors make daily visits to the schools under 
their chaige, and to them are referred all children who show 
evidences of disease or abnormal conditions. Children who 
are found to be unfit to remain in school are sent home, ac- 
companied by a slip properly tilled out advising that the fami- 
ly physician be consulted. The inspectors also make an an- 
nual inspection of all the children in the schools, and any 
defects discovered are called to the attention of the parents. 
Monthly inspections of the school buildings and premises are 
made, and suggestions or criticisms are referred to the proper 
authorities. Every effort is made to protect the health of 
the children and to co-operate with the parents in keeping 
the children in as normal a condition as possible. 

In accordance with the provisions of the statute, tests 
of sight and hearing are made by the principals or teachers. 

District No. 1 

Inspector Dr. Francis Shaw, 57 Cross Street. 
Schools Prescott, Hanscom, Edgerly and Boys' Vo- 
cational Schools. 

District No. 2 

Inspector Dr. Edward J. Dailey, 46 Bow Street. 
Schools Baxter, Knapp, Perry and Southern Junior 
High Schools. 

District No. 3 



Inspector Dr. Walter Jellis, 1028 Broadway. 
Schools Bennett, Pope, Cummings and Proctor 
Schools. 



District No. 4 



Inspector Dr. W. L. Bond, 322 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Morse, Carr, Durell and Burns Schools. 



1 1 EA LT 1 1 DETARTM KNT. 



129 



District No. 5 

Inspector Dr. H. M. Stoodley, 283 Highland Avenue. 
Schools Brown, Bingham, Forster and Northeastern 
Junior High Schools. 

District No. 6 

Inspector Dr. H. Cholerton, 94 College Avenue. 
Schools Western Junior High, Lincoln, Highland^ 
Cutler and Lowe Schools. 

District No. 7 

Inspector Dr. E. F. Sewall, 281 Broadway. 

Schools Glines and High Schools. 

Inspector Dr. M. W. White, 21 Walnut Street. 

Schools Parochial. 

During the year 10,6G7 children have been referred to 
the inspectors during their daily visits, and 588 have been 
sent home because of illness. 

The following list will show the classes of diseases and 
defects which have been found in the schools, except defects 
of sight and hearing: 



List of Diseases and Number of Cases Reported 

1. Infectious Diseases: — 

Chicken Pox . . ' 48 

Measles 27 

Mumps 73 

Scarlet Fever ....... 13 

Whooping Cough 4 



Total . . . . 

Diseases of the nose and throat: — 
Enlarged tonsils and adenoids 
Inflammatory diseases 
Other abnormal conditions 

Total . . . . 

Diseases of the eyes: — 

Inflammatory conditions . 
Foreign bodies . . . . 
Other abnormal conditions 

Total 

Diseases of the ears: — 

Inflammatory conditions . 
Other abnormal conditions 



541 

328 
1 



38 
1 

28 



53 
36 



165 



870 



67 



Total 



130 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Diseases of the skin: — 










Eczema ..... 


50 




Herpes 






53 




Impetigo 






250 




Pediculosis 






377 




Scabies 






44 




Tinea 






5 




Miscellaneous conditions 






194 




Total 


. 


973 


Miscellaneous diseases: — 






Diseases of the circulatory system 


3 




Diseases of the digestive system 


88 




Diseases of the lymphatic system 


50 




Diseases of the nervous system 


4 




Diseases of the respiratory system 


39 




Wounds and injuries 


64 




Diseases of the teeth 


12 




Other conditions 


48 




Total .... 




308 


Total number of diseases repor 


ted . 


2,472 


Vaccinations performed . 




229 


Examinations for vaccinations 




668 


Certificates to work . 








139 



Bacteriological Work 

The re]3ort of tlie work of this department is made by 
Frank L. Morse, M.D., on a subsequent page and becomes a 
part of this report. 

Undertakers 

Under the provisions of Section 49 of Chapter 114 of 
the General Laws, twenty-six persons have been duly licensed 
-as undertakers. 

Examinations of Plu«mbers 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
pluml)ers, consisting of the chairman of the board of health, 
the inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be 
appointed by the board of health. This board appointed Dun- 
can C. Greene, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place of 
expert. The number of licenses granted will be found in the 
report of the inspector of buildings. 



Health Nurses 



There are at present five nurses employed by this board. 
Two of these are employed as school nurses and the work of 
the others consists of follow-up work regarding tuberculosis 
cases and post-natal baby hygiene work. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 131 

The reports of the school nurses are made a part of the 
report of the School Committee and those of the other nurses 
are made a part of this report being submitted in detail in 
subsequent pages. 

Infant Hygiene Clinics 

During the past year under the supervision of this board, 
clinics have been held every Thursday afternoon at the Ben- 
nett Schoolhouse and ever}' Frida}^ afternoon at the Bingham 
Schoolhouse except when those days were holidays. 909 ba- 
bies have been under the supervision of these clinics. The 
average weekl}- attendance at the Bennett Schoolhouse was 
30 and at the Bingham Schoolhouse 60. 

This work is of inestimable value and the results are 
very far reaching. 

C. A. C. Richardson^ M. D., 

Wesley M. GofF;, 

James A. Kiley^ 

Board of ffealth. 

Attest: 

Laurence S. Howard^, Executive Clerk. 



132 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF HEALTH NURSES 



Somerville, Mass., 
January 2, 1925. 
To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

We submit the following report of work performed by 
us in infant hygiene, post natal and tuberculosis cases for the 
year ending December 31, 1924. 



Infant Hygiene 

Infants reported as born in Somerville during 
Infants born elsewhere resident in Somerville 
Pairs of twins born in Somerville 
Sets of triplets born in Somerville . . 
Still-births in Somerville .... 
Infants who moved away from Somerville . 
Infants reported with Ophthalmia Xeonatoriim 
Infants reported with Conjunctivitis . 
Infants reported with Infantile Paralysis . 



1924 



1,648 

485 

14 



73 

276 

12 

15 

8 



There were one hundred and ten deaths of infants under 
one year of age in Somerville during the past year as shown 
in the following table: 



Prematurity 
Congenital diseases . 
Intestinal Diseases . 
Accidental Injury 
Pneumonia and other 



diseases 



Total 

Infants dying in Somerville residence elsewhere . 
Infants under supervision at Baby Welfare Clinics 

Jan. 1. 1924 

Registration during 1924 ...... 

Total under supervision during 1924 . . . . 



26 

42 

8 

3 

31 



110 

22 

556 
353 

909 



Tuberculosis 

Pulmonary tuberculosis cases reported in 1924 . 
Other forms of tuberculosis reported in 1924 . 
Patients admitted to Sanatoria .... 
Patients previously reported in Sanatoria . 
Deaths in Somerville (Pulmonary 35 — Other Forms 

11) 

Deaths in Sanatoria 16 — Discharged 30 
Patients now in Sanatoria ..... 
Patients temporarily out of Somerville 
Patients who have moved awav from Somerville . 



108 
24 
55 
20 

46 
46 
48 
21 
46 



HEALTH DEl'ARTMENT. 



133 



TABLE SHOWING AGES AND SEX OF CASES IN THIS CITY 
Pulmonary Tuberculosis 



Aires 



Under fifteen years 

From fifteen to twenty years . 
From twenty to thirty years. 
From thirty to forty years.... 
Over forty years 



Total 



Skx 



Male 



1 
4 

18 
13 
14 



50 



Female 



2 

B 

26 

10 

13 



57 



Total 



3 
10 
44 
23 
27 



107 



Other Forms of Tuberculosis. 



Ages 


Sex 


Total 


Male Female 




Under fifteen years 


3 
1 
3 
2 
2 


5 
2 
3 
1 
3 


8 


From fifteen to twenty years 




From twenty to thirty years 


6 


From thirty to forty years 


3 


Over forty years 


5 






Total 


11 14 


25 











Miscellaneous 

Typhoid Fever cases reported (died 1) 



10 



Baby Hygiene 

Tuberculosis 

Miscellaneous 



Total visits 



Recapitulation of Visits 



8035 
788 
613 

9,432 



Respectfully submitted, 



Helen B. Berry^ 
Mary L. Scott, R. N., 
Grace E. Pickering, R. N., 

Health Nurses. 



134 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION 

, Somerville, Mass., 

January 2, 1925. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present the report of the Department of Medi- 
cal Inspection for the year 1924 including statistics of the 
Contagious Hospital. 



Visits 

Scarlet Fever — Each, case must be inspected before release 
from quarantine to see that the condition of the 
patient is suitable for release 

Diphtheria — Before patients are released from quarantine two 
successive negative cultures must be obtained . 

Contagious Hospital . . . . . . 



Total number of visits 



372 

192 
373 

937 



Disease 
Diphtheria 
Scarlet Fever 
Miscellaneous 



Contagious Disease Hospital 



In Hospital Ad- 
Jan. 1, 1924 mitted 


Discharged 

Well or 
Improved Dead 


Hospital 

Jan. 
1, 1925 


4 91 

17 117 

13 


88 5 

129 2 

13 


2 
3 





The daily average of patients was 11.8^ 



LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS 









D 


phth 


eria 






Negative 


Positive 


Tota 


January 153 


38 


191 


February 










162 


19 


181 


March 










108 


11 


119 


April 










114 


14 


128 


Alay 










89 


7 


96 


June 










61 


8 


69 


July 
August 










52 
25 


3 

1 


55 
26 


September 










35 





35 


October 










45 


7 


52 


November 










104 


10 


114 


December 










125 


9 


134 



Totals 



1,073 



127 



1200 



HEALTH DErARTMENT. 



135 





fuberculosis 








Negative 


Positive 


Tota 


January .... 


12 


4 


16 


February . . . - . 


14 


6 


20 


March .... 


9 


1 


10 


April . • . 


10 


3 


13 


May 


14 


3 


17 


June 


19 


2 


21 


July 


11 


1 


12 


August .... 


11 


1 


12 


September 


4 


1 


5 


October .... 


6 


3 


» 


November 


8 


2 


10 


December .... 


14 


2 


IG 



Total 



132 



29 



16L 



Typhoid 



Negative Positive Total 



January 

February 

March 










4 
2 



2 




6 
2 



April 

May 

June 










2 
1 
1 







2 
L 


July 
August 










1 
1 







I 
I 


September 
October 










2 

•4 


2 
1 


4 

5 


November 



















December 













X 


I 


Total 










18 


6 


24 



Examinations made for Malaria, Oph- 
thalmia, Paratyphoid, Gonnorrhea 

and Pneumona 

Total examinations . . 



IS 
1,403 



Tuberculosis 

During 1924 there. were 46 deaths from Tuberculosis in- 
cluding all forms, 35 of which were of the pulmonary type. 
This record shows a decrease from the previous year when 
54 deaths were reported. 

All patients ill with the disease coming to the attention 
of the board have either been supervised at their homes by the 
Public Health Nurses, or have been placed in sanatoria when 
such treatment was needed. 

The tuberculosis ward at the Contagious Hospital which 
was closed on September 1, 1921 on account of the small num- 
ber of patients in the hospital, was reopened during July and 
August as a Preventorium for children who were undernour- 
ished or lived in families where tuberculosis cases existed. 



13() ANNUAL REPORTS 

111 this work the board was assisted by a contribution pro- 
vided by the Tuberculosis Seal Sale which was supervised by 
the Visiting Xureing Association. 

During these two months Ul children were residents at 
the Preventorium for a total of TOG days, the average stay be- 
ing 13 days. Much good was accomplished among these chil- 
dren, marked improvement being observed in their physical 
condition, and it sliould be maintained continuously. 

Infant Hygiene Clinics 

On January 1. 1922 the board with the approval of His 
Honor the Mayor, assumed the care of the Infant Hygiene 
Clinics previously maintained by Somerville Chapter of the 
American Eed Cross. These clinics have been held on Thurs- 
day afternoon at the Bennett School and Friday afternoon at 
the Bingham School thruotit the year. An average attend- 
ance of (iO at tlie Bingham School and 30 at the Bennett School 
lias been attained. 473 new babies have been under supervis- 
ion at the clinics where advice has been given to the mothers 
l)y the attending physician, and in many instances the infants 
have been visited at home by the Public Health Xurses in 
order that the advice may be properly followed out. This 
work is unquestionably of great value in conserving the health 
of new born infants. 

Kespectfully submitted, 
^ Frank L. Morse_, 

Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 137 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS 



Somerville, Mass., 
January 2, 1925. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit the following as my report for the year ending 
December 31, 1924. 



Inspections 

The following table shows the number of inspections 
made during the past year. In order to safeguard the con* 
sumer, all establishments handling foodstuffs are under con- 
stant supervision. Lunch carts and restaurants have been 
inspected weekly. 

Under the provisions of the General Laws of 1920 all 
bakeries are required to register with the board of health. 
The law provides that all doors and windows shall be proper- 
ly screened and that all food exposed for sale shall be kept 
covered. Careful inspections of all bakeries have been made 
to see that this law has been complied with. 

All the factories in the city have been inspected monthly. 

The Barber Shops are under ver}^ careful inspection and 
must be kept in a sanitary condition, and the barbers are re- 
quired to keep themselves neat and clean and to j^roperly steril- 
ize their instruments. 



Number of Inspections 



Bakeries 


580 


Milk and Cream plants . 


173 


Barber shops 


549 


Pedlers and Wagons and 




Billiard Halls and Bowl- 




stock 


2,490 


ing alleys 


105 


Public Halls . 


47 


Blacksmiths' shops 


11 


Rendering plants . 


60 


Candy and Ice Cream 




Slaughter houses . 


307 


plants 


205 


Stores and markets 


4,650 


Factories 


160 


Stables .... 


199 


Fish markets 


685 


Theatres 


91 


Hen houses and yards 


184 


Vacant lots and dumps 


87 


Lunch rooms and cars . 


1,068 


Yards and cellars . 


304 



138 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



\ Articles Condemned 

The following is a list of the articles condemned 

Fish 



Haddock 

Halibut 

Herring 

Mackerel 

Oysters 

Salmon 

Smelts 



188 lbs. 

44 lbs. 

11 lbs. 

256 lbs. 

2 qts. 

42 lbs. 

7 lbs. 



Fruit 



Apples 

Bananas . 

Blackberries 

Canteloupes 

Grape Fruit 

Grapes 

Lemons 

Lemons 

Oranges 

Oranges 

Peaches 

Raspberries 

Strawberries 

Watermelons 



7 bus. 

50 doz. 

30 qts. 
IVz cts. 

15 box 
4 box 

12 doz. 

V2 box 

10 box 

10 doz. 

12 bas. 

24 pts. 
117 qts. 

20 



Meats 



Bacon 








30 lbs 


Beef ( corned ) 








249 lbs 


Beef (fresh) 








420 lbs 


Fowl 








348 lbs 


Frankfurt sausage 








12 lbs 


Lamb . . 








454 lbs 


Liver 








8 lbs 


Pork (fresh) 








265 lbs 


Pork (salt) . 








138 lbs 


Sausages 








74 lbs 


Shoulder (corned) 








12 lbs 


Tripe 








5 lbs 


Veal 








245 lbs 


Vegetables 


Beans (string) 10 bus 


Beans (string) 








3 bas 


Beans (green) 








1 bas 


Beans (green) 








5 bus 


Beets ... 








1 bus 


Cabbage 








1 bus 


Carrots 








1 bus 



HBAI/TH DEPARTMENT. 



139 



Celery 

Corn 

Cucumbers 

Lettuce . 

Lettuce 

Lettuce 

Onions . 

Onions . 

Potatoes (white 

Potatoes (white) 

Potatoes (sweet) 

Tomatoes 

Turnips 

Turnips 

Turnips 



Butter 

Bread 

Cake 

Candy 

Cereal 

Cheese 

Coffee 

Coffee 

Crackers 

Crackers 

Dates 

Eggs 

Flour 

Flour 

Lard 

Macaroni 

Nuts 

Raisins 

Raisins 

Rice 

Sugar 

Tea 

Tobacco 



Miscellaneous 



55 


bun. 


13 


bus. 


2 


bus. 


2 


box 


4 


bus. 


12 


doz. 


3 


bus. 


6 


bags 


1 


bbl. 


181/2 


bus. 


1 


bbl. 


60 


bas. 


1 


bus. 


IV2 


bbl. 


200 


lbs. 


30 


lbs. 


65 


loaves 


15 


lbs. 


360 


lbs. 


1007 


pkgs. 


15 


lbs. 


50 


lbs. 


3 


bags 


18 


lbs. 


10 


box 


55 


lbs. 


10 


doz. 


667 


lbs. 


48 


bags 


20 


lbs. 


52 


pkgs. 


2 


bus. 


1/2 


box 


15 


lbs. 


150 


lbs. 


574 


lbs. 


95 


lbs. 


12 


lbs. 



Slaughter Houses 

During the year weekly inspections have been made at 
all slaughtering establishments and these plants were never 
in a more sanitary condition than at present. 

The number of animals slaughtered during 1924 in this 
city was less than during 1923. 



Swine 
Sheep 
Calves 
Cattle 



Number of Animals Slaughtered in 1924 



878,072 

289,999 

74,154 

39,218 



1,281,443 



140 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Examination of Animals for Contagious Diseases 

During the last year the city was entirely free from con- 
tagions diseases in animals, except ten cases of rabies in dogs. 

Animals Examined 



Horses 
Cows 
Goats 
Dogs 



Inspected 


Quaran- 
tined 


Killed 


Released 


1295 











2 











13 











23 


23 


10 


13 



1,333 23 10 13 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Charles M. Berry_, 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 



HEALTH DEl'ARTMENT. 



141 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR 

Chemical and Bacteriological Laboratory, 

CJity Hall Annex, 
Somerville, Mass., 
January 2, 1925. 

To the Board of Health, 

Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present mj annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1924. 

On the above date there were licensed to sell milk, 723 
stores and 53 dealers; and 131 stores were registered to sell 
oleomargarine an increase over the previous 3^ear of 23 stores 
selling milk and 18 dealers handling oleomargarine. Two 
dealers who were distributing milk either discontinued busi- 
ness or ownership was transferred. 

Of the 53 dealers handling milk and cream 19 are lo- 
cated in Somerville and 34 are located in neighboring cities. 
Fifty dealers are pasteurizing according to the General Laws, 
11 dealers sell cream exclusively, and 3 dealers handle only 
raw milk. There are approximately 36,000 quarts of milk and 
2500 quarts of cream distributed in Somerville dail3\ 

The following tables 1, 2, 3, are a summary of the work 
of the department for the year. 



Table 1. 



Months. 


License 
Application.s 


CC - 

9.00 

6.50 

7.50 

9.00 

277.00 

70.50 

28.00 

10.00 

11.00 

11.00 

7.50 

6.50 


Analytical 

Fees. 


rr- If. 

■X 93 

d, '-' 

^^ 
M >' 

9.00 

6.50 

8.50 

9.00 

277.50 

71.00 

28.00 

12.00 

11.50 

11.00 

8.00 

6.50 


Analyses j 
on Account. 


Total i 
Income for 
Dept. 


January 


18 
13 
15 
18 
554 
141 
56 
20 
22 
22 
15 
13 


194.50 
187.50 
209.50 
166.50 
170.50 
187.50 
139.00 
205.50 
188.50 
189.50 
187.50 
185.50 


203 50 


February 




1.00 " 


194 00 


March 


218.00 


April 


175 50 


May 


.50 
.50 


448.00 


June 

July 


258.50 
167 00 


August 


2.00 
.50 


217 50 


September 

October 


200,00 
200 50 


November 

December 


.50 


195.50 
192 00 








Total 


907 


453.50 


5.00 


458.50 


— 

2211.50 


2670 00 







142 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Table 2 
Samples of Mjik, Cream, Ice Cream and Vinegar Examined 



Months. 


Chemical 
Samples 
Collected. 


Bact. 
Collections. 


Lorenz 
Tests. 


Total 
Collections. 


Samples 
Submitted 


Total 
Examina- 
tions. 


January 


139 
185 
210 
237 
202 
201 
237 
184 
187 
178 
151 
120 


41 
50 
27 
42 
16 
32 
32 
50 
5 
15 
50 
69 


41 
50 
27 
42 
16 
32 
32 
50 
5 
15 
50 
40 


221 

285 
264 
321 
234 
2()5 
301 
284 
197 
208 
251 
229 


374 
375 
425 
303 
346 
372 
272 
413 
374 
375 
375 
371 


595 


February 


660 


March 


689 


April 


624 


May 


580 


June 


637 


July 

August 


573 
697 


September 

October 


571 
583 


November 

December 


626 
600 


Total 


2231 


429 


400 


3060 


4375 


7435 



Table 3 



Months. 




mo 


Jo 


Temperature 
Notices. 


Total 
Notices. 


Inspections. 


January . . . 


1 

8 

7 

25 

18 

30 

35 

11 

5 

2 

4 


8 

10 
4 
9 
5 

15 

9 

11 

1 

2 

6 
8 






9 
20 
13 
34 
23 
47 
48 
22 
6 
4 
12 
11 


47 


February 


2 
2 




52 


March 




65 


April 




36 


May 






44 


June 






38 


July 




2 
4 


121 


" "*j 

August 




31 


September 

October 




76 






20 


November 


CO to 




66 


December 




81 










Total 


146 


88 


9 


6 


249 


677 







IIEAl.TIT DEIWIITMENT. " 14.*{ 

During 1924 license fees and fees for analyses amounted 
to $2670.00 an increase over the previous year of |1348.00. 
There were in 1924, 7485 laboratory examinations of milk and 
milk products, an increase over 1923 of 2082 samples examined. 

There were during 1924, G dealers prosecuted for selling 
milk of inferior quality and all paid their fines amounting 
to f 195.00. 

Income for Department 

Fees for issuing milk licenses . . . $453 50 

Fees for analyses 2,216 50 

Fines paid in Lower Court .... 195 00 



Total ....... $2,865 00 

Each month during the year pint samples have been 
taken from every milk dealer and analyzed for food value 
(fats and solids) and cleanliness, (bacterial count and sedi- 
ment). 

The higher the fat and solids the greater the food value. 
The lower the bacterial count, the greater care in production, 
better handling or more efficient pasteurization is shown. 

By calling the office of the milk inspector these figures 
will be cheerfully quoted. 

November 19, 1924 regulations governing the produc- 
tion, handling and sale of Grade A. milk became operative 
and the department hopes to be in a position to enforce these 
regulations. Anyone desiring a copy of Grade A. milk regu- 
lations will receive one b}^ applying at this office. 

Recommendations 

In addition to the recommendations made last year I 
believe there should be provided a suitable method of medical 
supervision of employees in milk plants. 

KespectfuUy submitted, 

Herbert E. Bowman, 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



144 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUPPORT OF PUBUC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



Board of Public Welfare 

Fred E. DtTirTix, President 

Michael Coll. Vice-President 

George G. Brayley 

James D. Sharkey 

Committees 
On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home 
Mr. Dltigin, Mr. Coll, Mr. Brayley, and Mr. Sharkey 

Clerks 
J©SE»HiivE S. Philbrook Helex E. Lineqar 

Margaret J. Preble 

General Agent 
William E. Copithorne 

City Physician 
Frank E^ Batemax, M. D. 

Warden and Matron, City Home 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Colquhoun 

Office 
City Hall, Highland Avenue 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WELFARE. 145 



Somerville, Mass., 
December 31, 1924. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
Oitv of Somerville : 



Oentlemen 



The Board of Public Welfare submit herewith reports 
of the General Agent, the Warden of the City Home and the 
City Physician, with tables showing the work. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Fred E. Durgin_, 

George G. Brayley^ 

James D. Sharkey^ 

Board of 

Public 

Welfare.. 



^•^^ ANNUAL REl'ORTS. 



REPORT OF GENERAL AGENT 



City Hall, January 1, 1925. 
To the Board of Public Welfare, Somerville, Mass :— 

Geutlemen,— The following as the report of the general 
agent for the year ending December 31, 1924 is herewith sub- 
mitted : — 

Table No. 1 

FULL SUPPORT (During the year) 

In Citj^ Home (men 32, women 30) 62 

In City Home, December 31, 1924 [ 44 

In hospitals for the sick in other cities, towns and state 48 

Table No. 2 
PARTIAL SUPPORT (Outside Relief) 

Families ..... .... 149 

Persons aided (including hospital cases) .... 910 

Burials 10 

Permits to State Infirmary ....... g 

I [^. Table No. 3 

CHILDREN 

In private families ......... 17 

In care of state division of child guardianship . . 23 

Table No. 4 

AID UNDER 1913 LAW (Mothers' Aid) 

Number of mothers' aid cases, January 1, 1924 ... 57 

Number of families aided at close of year .... 60 

Number of children 253 

Amount allowed each family, from $4-00 to $24.00 per week 

Number of out-of-town families 8 

Number having no settlement ...... 14 

Cost to City 

Somerville settlement $23,152 00 

Settled in other cities and towns (reside here) . . 3,398 00 

State 8,330 00 

Somerville families living in other cities and towns . . 6,527 88 

$41,407 88 



HOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



147 



Table No. 5 
REIMBURSEMENTS 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
City of Boston 
" " Cambridge 
" Everett 
" Lynn 
" Medford 
" Maiden 
" " Worcester 
Town of Brookline . 
" " Merrimac 
" Plymouth 
" " Shrewsbury 
" " Somerset 
" Watertown 
Individual 



Table No. 6 
SOMBRVILLE HOSPITAL (City Patients) 

Patients having settlement in Somerville . . . 
Patients having settlement in other cities and towns 
Patients having no settlement (chargeable to State) 
Total number of patients sent to hospital . 
Amount paid to hospital ...... 



131.971 


54 


477 


58 


1,835 


04 


47 


77 


576 


16 


543 


50 


40 


00 


391 


40 


24 


00 


112 


00 


344 


00 


180 


16 


88 


00 


453 


50 


76 


00 


$37,084 


65 



48 
18 
24 
90 
$9,607 .48 







Table 


No. 7 








POPULATION AND GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1900 to 


1924 


Year 












1900 


— *61,643 Misc. 


$23,697.62 


Home, 


$5,528.83 Total 


$29,226.45 


1901 


— 62,500 


29,171.15 




6,622.43 


35,793.58 


1902 


— 63,500 


28,667.04 




7,396.64 


36,063.68 


1903 


— 65,500 


30,470.20 




7,548.39 


38,018.59 


1904 


— 69,500 


20,476.64 




6,563.11 


27,039.65 


1905 


— *69,272 


17,527.88 




7,474.36 


25,002.24 


1906 


— 72.000 


18,237.53 




6,806.79 


25,044.32 


1907 


— 74,000 


17,852.20 




7,001.23 


24,853.43 


1908 


— 75,500 


17,955.34 




6,875.56 


24,830.90 


1909 


— 75,500 


16,843.17 




7,562.83 


24,406.00 


1910 


— *77,236 


16,110.42 




7,695.89 


23,806.31 


1911 


— 78,000 


16,327.56 




7,842.03 


24,169.59 


1912 


— 81,000 


19,201.33 




8,998.97 


28,200.30 


1913 


— 82,000 


21,827.73 




10,945.95 


32,773.68 


1914 


— 85,000 


35,619.68 




11,200.25 


46,819.93 


1915 


— *86,854 


45,490.98 




11,218.65 


56,709.63 


1916 


— 90,000 


51,759.62 




11,593.41 


63,353.03 


1917 


— 90,000 


53,653.33 




13,417.77 


67.071.10 


1918 


— 90,500 


63,420.48 




15,411.20 


78,831.68 


1919 


— 91,000 


67,682.53 




15,789.34 


83,471.87 


1920 


— *93,033 


77,456.57 




17,308.29 


94,764.86 


1921 


— 95,000 


87,922.69 




15,069.81 


102,992.50 


1922 


— 97,000 


95,510.92 




13,577.07 


109.087.99 


1923 


— 98,000 


88,909.21 




14,770.97 


103,680.18 


1924 


—100,000 


100,013.27 




14,891.79 


114,905.06 



OVE-SEEnS OF THE POOR OF SOMERVILLE 
Since t - e -^ : : . ~ ration in II 



-H :_ - .:. -^ -_:i-;- _ __^.: __^iii. ^i-<*ffieio 1S85 1S8S indvsiTe 

«ft BL Hffl . 18S5 188S 

^ "JneoliL. E)sqL^ diainnam . 1S85 18S7 " 

Glinfss 18S5 1887 

^^^ett CpressMcmt 1SSS-18S21I . 1885 Apr. 1883 
I ^cst Cpresideiit May, 18M — 

in 1888 1912 

- - -m 1888 J^r. 18M 

-. .. P(9e. diainnaii ex-officio 1889 1891 ** 
tx ^.^ed C^«sident 1893 to April 

lS9t Apr. 1894 

- -: _. HL Hods^±BS. diaimDan ex- 

... 1892 1895 

^Jati^«^ . HinckleF May 1892 1«^ 

tAIbert W. Bdmands . May 1893 Ort. li-lS 

H^lint EL Menin May 1894 19Cr 

irKmi D. Souther .... 1895 Feb. ISS^ 

Hon. Albion A. Pmry, cbairman ex-ofido 189C 18^^ 

i^Jamcs BL Butler .... Mardt 1898 189^ 
tHoB- George O. Proctor, diairmaii ex- 

. ofioo 1899 

Henry 'F. Curtis. M. D. x president 1912- 

19191 1910 1921 

Philip Koen 1912 Xor. 191€ 

TlEkAael Coll .NoTiranber 191S Dec^ 1924 

*¥teA B. Dvrgiii Cpresident 1919 to dateH 

October 1918 :i:e 

*George G. Brayley - JaM^vary 1922 i^:~ 

* James D. Shailcey December 1924 :a:e 



«?EC^»ITUi-ATlON Clii&:-""s-e: -s 






■^ Deceased 



Be^ecffulfy submitted. 

Gemerml Agemt, 



Table No. 8 
EXPENDITURES IN DETAIL FOR THE YEAR 1924 



1924 


Board. 


Auto 
Mainte- 
nance 


Burials. 


Somerville 

Poor in 
other Cities 
and Towns. 


Cash 
Paid 
Out. 


Somerville 

Poor in 

other Cities 

and Towns 

1913 Law. 


Cash 
Allowance 


Fuel 
and 

Clothing 


Groceries. 


Other 
Institu- 
tions. 


Med. Att. 

and 
Medicine 


Nursing. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


Salaries. 


Somerville 
Hospital. 


state 
Institu- 
tions. 


All other. 


Telephone. 


Totals 


January 

February 

March 


$133.57 
102.86 
291.01 
741.26 

86.71 
343.13 
886.11 

92.99 
983.68 

92.99 
112.99 
106.28 


$12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 


$1.30.00 
70.00 


$585.35 

579.68 

13.71 

227.99 

9.14 


$4,602.75 
4,734.46 
5,647.00 
4,275.30 
5,608.46 
4,482.50 
4,545.87 
5,792.40 
4,883.50 
5,084.25 
6,658.40 
5,425.96 


$. 


$84.08 
80.79 
86.36 
92.14 
95.22 
83.57 
86.36 
96.93 
79.28 
81.93 
62.14 
64.22 


$ 8.25 


$240.00 
101.00 
130.00 
161.00 
131.00 

87.00 
113.00 
108.00 
146.00 
108.00 
113.00 

84.00 


$51.43 


$29.06 

20.28 

9.25 

3.66 

12.06 

13.26 

14.24 

5.00 


$ 5.50 

3.00 

6.00 

11.00 

13.00 


$ 


$537.81 
558.93 
677.83 
567.26 
561.16 
567.26 
701.22 
615.16 
467.26 
567.26 
661.16 
617.66 


$817.00 
605.50 
626.50 
854.00 
854.00 
850.50 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 
833.33 


$183.00 


$48.00 
30.00 
39.00 
15.00 
18.00 


$ 8.59 
9.14 
10.09 
8.84 
8.59 
9.09 
8.24 
8.69 
9.44 
9.54 
10.94 
9.94 


$7,476.89 
6,911.26 
7,633.18 

10,176.79 
7,700.85 
7,916.59 




3.12 

4.50 

11.25 

17.00 

7.00 

.85 

38.50 

28.21 

10.62 

2.38 






79.43 




April 




3,007.24 

234.00 

1,380.79 




188.35 


May 




40.01 




June 




79.99 




July 


40.00 
83.00 


242.93 
1621.84 
776.09 
901.39 
493.30 
69.00 




2.50 


346.00 


10.00 


7,843.15 
10,476.84 

8,247.58 


August 


1,207.00 






September ... 










18.00 
10.00 


October 










38.96 
16.96 
11.11 




716.21 


8,484.57 
9,222.34 


November ... 


120.00 


234.00 
464.85 






3.00 


December.... 




102.00 






7,923.23 














Totals 


$3,973.58 


$150. 


$443.00 


$5,520,42 


$61,740.85 


$6,527.88 


$993.02 


$48.26 


$1,522.00 


$312.85 


173.84 


$44.00 


$123.43 


$7,099.97 


$9,607.48 


$1,433.56 


$188.00 


$111.13 


100,013.27 



BOARD OF rUFJLTC WKT.FARE. 



149 



REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOME 



City Home, January 1, 1925 

To the Board of Public Welfare, Somerville, Mass. : — 

Gentlemen : — I submit the following as the report of the 
Warden of tlie City Home for the year ending December 31, 
1924 :— 



Table No. 1 

Number of weeks' board of inmates 
Number of males admitted during 1924 . 
Number of females admitted during 1924 
Number of males discharged during 1924 
Number of females discharged during 1924 
Number of males supported during 1924 . 
Number of females supported during 1924 
Number of males died during 1924 . 
Number of females died during 1924 
Number of inmates in home, December 31, 1924 



2050-2 
15 
11 

7 

4 
32 
30 

1 

6 
44 



City Home Hospital 

Number of weeks' board 

Number of patients admitted 

Number of patients in hospital, December 31, 1924 



531-2 
18 
12 



Table No. 2 



Reimbursements . 
Net expenditures . , 

Appropriation and transfers 



;,819 68 
!,072 11 



$14,891 79 
$14,891 79 



Respectfully submitted, 
J. Foster Colquiioun^, 



Warden. 



150 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN 



Somerville, January 1, 1925. 
To His Honor, tlie Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen : — 

The work of your City Physician during the year 1924 is 
presented in the following abstract : — 



Office consultations and treatments 








261 


Total outside visits .... 








766 


Confinements ..... 








2 


Vaccinations 








13 


Visits at City Home .... 








12^ 


Attended at Police Station . 








22 


Examinations : — 


For legal department 31 


For highway department 








1 


For police department 








11 


For fire department 








4 


For soldiers' relief department 








3 


For public grounds department 








1 


For sanitary department 








4 


For water department 








1 


For pension ..... 








6 



Much of the important conference work of the Cit}' Physi- 
cian does not admit of tabulation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Bateman^, 

City Physician. 



CHIEF OF POLH'B. 151 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen : — I respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Somerville police department for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1924. 

Arrests 

Whole number of arrests made .... 3,11& 

With and without warrants 2,690 

On Summons and notification 429 



Males 3,007 

Females 112 



Americans 2,101 

Foreign born 1,018 



Residents 1,772 

Non-residents 1,347 



1, — Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

Abduction 1 

Assaults 3 

Assault and battery 108 

Assault and battery on officers .... 9 

Assault with a dangerous weapon .... 3 

Manslaughter ....... 2 

Murder 2 

Rape, attempt 1 

Rape attempt, accessory to . . . . . 1 

Robbery 9 

Threats ......... 11 



2, — Crimes and Offenses Against Property 



Breaking and entering . 
Breaking and entering, attempt . 
Breaking and entering and larceny 

Breaking glass 

Destroying electric lamp . 



29 

1 

35 

14 

1 



3,11& 



3,119 



3,11S» 



3,119 



I5«i/ 



152 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Injury to property . 
Larcenies .... 

Larceny in building . 
Larceny, attempt . . • . 
Leased property, concealment of . 
Leased property, selling . 
Personal property, concealment of 
Receiving stolen goods 
Stealing ride on freight car . 
Trespass ..... 
Unlawful appropriation of horse 
TLFnlawfully diverting electricity 



7 

108 

6 

5 

1 

1 

1 

11 

11 

32 

2 

1 



Crimes and offenses Against Public Order, etc. 



Abandonment of infant . . . 

Abandonment of infant, aiding and abetting 

Accosting a female 

Adultery 

Bail surrender . 

Bribery, attempt 

Capias 

Contempt of court 

Cruelty to animals 

Defauft 

Deserter. United States Army . 

Desertion of minor child 

Desertion of wife 

Disturbing the peace 

Disturbing a public assembly . 

Disturbing a religious assembly 

Dog keeping, unlicensed . 

Drunkenness .... 

Drunkenness, common 

Pirearms, carrying without permit 

jPornication .... 

Fugitive from justice 

Gaming ..... 

Giving false alarm of fire . 

Indecent exposure of person , 

Indictment .... 

Interrupting funeral procession 

Lewd cohabitation 

Lottery, promoting . 

IVeglected child 

Neglect to support . 

Obscene literature, in posession of 

Peddling, unlicensed 

Perjury, and attempt to incite 

^Polygamy .... 

IRef using to aid officer 

'Kescue of prisoners, and attempts 

Safe keeping, bail surrender 

Safe keeping, demented 

Safe keeping, escape from prison camp 

Skfe keeping, feeble minded 

Safe keeping, infirm . 

Safe keeping, insane 



1 

1 
1 
7 
1 
1 

26 
1 
3 

32 
1 
1 
2 
6 
7 

10 
2 
1,639 
8 
2 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
3 
1 
116 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
5 
2 

25 
1 
2 
1 
5 



266 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



153 



Violation 
Violation 



Violation 
Violation 
Violation 
Violation 



of 
of 



of 
of 
of 
of 



Safe keeping, revoke of parole 

Safe keeping, runaways . 

Stubbornness 

Throwing glass in street . 

Vagrancy 

city ordinances 

health regulations 
Violation of illegitimate child act 
Violation of labor laws 

liquor laws 

Lord's Day 

milk laws 

motor vehicle laws 
Violation of narcotic drug laws 
Violation of and revoke of parole 
Violation of pure food laws . 
Violation of terms of probation 
Violation of school laws . 
Violation of weight and measure 
Walking on railroad track . 



laws 



Recapitulation 

(1) Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

(2) Crimes and Offenses Against Property . 

(3) Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order 

etc. ....... 

» Total number of arrests made . 
Bailed to appear elsewhere .... 
Cases in which nolle prosequi was entered and 

dismissed ...... 

Released by probation officer, drunkenness 
Surrendered to court, other officers, institutions 

etc. . 



Number of cases held for trial . 



1 

7 
13 

5 

3 
76 

2 
19 

5 

'74 

24 

10 

448 

2 
12 

2 
37 
15 

8 

2 



150 
266 

2,703 



30 

31 
17 

215 



2,703 



3,119 



293 



2,826 



NOTE. — One hundred and eighty-two of the above number of 
cases were juveniles and delinquents. 



Miscellaneous Reports 



Abandoned automobiles 
Abandoned infant found 
Accidents reported 
Accosting females 
Amount of property stolen 
Amount of stolen property recovered 
Amount of property damaged 
Amount of property lost 
Amount of property found . 
Assault and battery, and assaults 
Attempts to commit arson . 
Attempts to break and enter 
Attempts to commit larceny 



118 

1 

1,066 

3 



$138,422 

187,076 

130 

1,042 

485 



82 
19 
00 
66 
89 
10 
2 
55 
10 



154 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Attempts to commit suicide 

Breaking and entering, false alarms of 

Buildings broken and entered, nothing stolen 

Buildings found open 

Cruelty to animals 

Dead animals found 

Dead infants found 

Defective bridges . 

Defective buildings 

Defective catch basins 

Defective curb stone and driveway 

Defective drinking fountains 

Defective electric lamps 

Defective fences 

Defective fire alarm boxes . 

Defective gas gate box . 

Defective hydrants . 

Defective man holes and covers 

Defective poles and posts 

Defective police signal service 

Defective railway . 

Defective sewers 

Defective sidewalks 

Defective signs and sign posts 

Defective stand pipe 

Defective step 

Defective streets 

Defective United States mail bo 

Defective water gate boxes . 

Defective wires 

Disturbances .... 

Dogs killed , . 

Dog unlicensed 

Dogs vicious .... 

Feeble minded .... 

Fire, alarms given for . 

Fire, danger of . . . 

Fire, false alarms of . 

Fire, needless alarms for 

Fires reported 

Fireworks, selling without permit 

Gaming 

Gas leaks .... 
Gas poisoning 
Horses killed .... 
Houses unoccupied 
Idle and disorderly 
Indecent exposure of person 
Infirm persons cared for . 
Larcenies, no value given . 
Larcenies .... 

Lost children .... 
Lost children found 
Malicious mischief 
Missing persons 
Missing persons found . 
Obstructions on railroad tracks 
Obstructions on railways 
Obstructions on sidewalks . 
Obstructions in streets 



6 
2 

75 

538 

4 

13 

2 

16 

7 

17 

2 

7 

15 

3 

3 

1 

6 

12 

7 

7 

1 

3 

389 

131 

1 

1 

171 

1 

45 

89 

30 

47 

1 

6 

1 

10 

1 

23 

6 

279 

1 

3 

3 

1 

2 

83 

1 

4 

2 

178 

864 

273 

273 

36 

86 

84 

2 

2 

19 

37 



CHIKF OF I*OLICE. 



155 



lighted . 
not lighted 



stopped 
streets dangerous from 



snow 



Obstructions in streets, 
Obstructions in streets, 
Panes of glass broken . 
Permits issued to carry firearms 
Permits to labor on Lord's Day . 
Persons bitten by dogs . 
Property damaged and destroyed 
Property lost, no value given 
Property found, no value given . 
Robberies, and attempts to rob . 
Runaway children .... 
Runaway children found 
Runaway horse .... 
Runaway teams 
Runaway teams 
Sidewalks and 

and ice ...... 

Sidewalks, streets and subways flooded 
Stray bullets fired .... 

Stray dogs and other animals . 

Stray dogs and other animals found . 

Stray teams 

Stray teams found 

Street lights reported 

Sudden deaths 

Suicides . 

Summonses served for witnesses and defend 

ants to appear in court at other places 
Suspicious persons 

Threats 

Trees dangerous . 

Trespass 

Trespass, wilful 
Unlawful appropriation of horse 
Unlawful appropriation of team 
Vagrancy .... 

Violation of city ordinances 
Violation of health regulation 
Violation of labor laws 
Violation of Lord's Day 
Violation of motor vehicle Jaws 
Violation of pool room law . 
"Water pipes leaking 
Windows broken , 



12 

6 

225 

224 

74 

47 

62 

71 

76 

34 

19 

20 

1 

3 

2 

74 

20 

4 

140 

72 

4 

4 

4,962 

8 

5 

860 

112 

1 

34 

62 

11 

1 

1 

1 

229 

1 

2 

3 

24 

1 

129 

73 



156 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OFFICIAL ROSTER OF DEPARTMENT 

Chief of Police 
Charles A. Kendall 

Captain 
Eugene A. Carter 



James M. Harmon 
John A. Ray 
Thomas Damery 

Frank H. Graves 
James M. Lynch 
William G. Kenney 



Lieutenants 



Sergeants 



Michael T. Kennedy 
Ernest Howard 



Robert T. Blair 
Thomas P. Walsh 
Charles J. Sharry 



Patrolmen 



1 — Edward M. Carter 
2 — Theodore E. Heron 
3 — Daniel G. Simons 
4 — Samuel Burns 
5 — John A. Dadmun 
6 — George L. Rice 
7— Myron S. Gott 
S — Charles W. Reick 
9 — Prank C. Hopkins 
10— Hudson M. Howe 
11 — Sanford S. Lewis 
12 — Henry A. Sudbey 
13 — Thomas F. McNamara 
14 — Louis F. Arnold 
15 — Charles S. Johnston 
16— Claude L. Grossman 
17 — John J. Cummings 
18 — Edmund J. Keane 
19 — Denis Downey 
20— Edward M. Da vies 
21 — George A. C. Peters 
22 — Louis J. Belzarini 
23— Walter Reed 
24 — Dennis G. Mulqueeney 
25 — Patrick J. Doolin 
26 — Edward J. Hopkins 
27— Walter L. Groves 
28 — Joseph A. Dwyer 
29 — Augustine J. Fitzpatrick 
30— Patrick McGrath 
31 — Bernard McCabe 
32— Harry C. Young 
33— Robert D. Dewar 
34 — Peter Moore 
35— Albert C. Hawes 
36 — Walter C. Oesting 
37 — John L. Cameron 
38 — Francis P. Higgins 
39— John J. McCahey 



40 — Alexander Morrison 
41 — Daniel J. Powers 
42 — Jeremiah O'Connor 
43— Charles E. Wilson 
44 — Timothy Buckley 
45 — John J. Killourhy 
46 — Thomas M. Sharry 
47 — Michael J. O'Loughlin 
48— Charles W. Shepherd 
49 — John F. Cruise 
50— John J. Shay 
51 — Edw^ard G. Butman 
52— John P. L. O'Keefe 
53— Alfred E. Robitaille 
54 — Allan S. Burns 
55— William H. Donovan 
56 — George R. Allan 
57 — Jeremiah Keniry 
58 — James Murray 
59— Charles J. Fulton 
60— Edward F. Culliton 
61— Alfred J. McFadden 
62 — James A. Fitzpatrick 
63— Elmer E. G. Raymond 
64 — Frank J. Roche 
65 — Augustine F. Sharry 
66— Daniel M. O'Connell 
67 — Chester F. Warner 
68 — George D. MacDonald 
69 — Charles F. Lacey 
70 — William E. Dwyer 
71 — Charles H. McAvoy 
72 — James F. Holmes 
73 — Michael J. Dowd, Jr. 
74 — Patrick J. Lyons 
75 — Alfred S. Macomber 
76 — Thomas A. Donovan 
77 — Thomas J. Flanagan 
78 — Timothy J. Corkery 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



157 



79 — Leo J. Hurley 
80— Henry W. Roche 
81— John H. Baker 



Patrolmen, Continued 



82 — John J. Courtney 
83 — Pierce P. Ronayne 



84— Joseph P. Blake 
85— Frank A. Silva, Jr. 
86— John J. Smith 
87 — Dennis F. Kearney 



Reservemen 



88 — Bdmond F. Fiynn 
89— LeRoy V. Pierce 
90 — Francis R. Begley 



Chau'ffeurs and Patrol Drivers 
1 — James W. Lundergan 4 — George R. Estee, Jr. 



2 — John H. McKenzie 
3— William R. Burnett 



James H. White 



Matron 
Mrs. Mina T. Weeks 

Assistant Matron 
Mrs. Katherine Woods 



Pensioners 

Ira S. Carleton, May 9, 

James J. Pollard, Feb. 27, 

Herbert Hilton, Dec. 21, 

Ezra A. Dodge, Mar. 14, 

George H. Carleton, Mar. 27,. 
Frederick H. Googins, 

Mar. 12, 

Jacob W. Skinner, Dec. 31, 



Retired on Half Pay 

1907 Elmer E. Drew, July 25, 1918 

1908 Ernest S. Goff, July 11, 1919 
1911 Charles W. Allen, Mar. 26, 1920 
1914 Jotham Chisholm, Apr. 23, 1920 

1914 Charles E. Woodman, 

June 24, 1921 

1915 Frederick G. Jones, Feb. 9, 1923 
1917 Francis A. Perkins, Apr. 25, 1924 



CHANGES IN THE FORCE 

Discharges 

Patrolman John H. O'Leary, discharged after hearings, to date from 
April 27, 1924. 

Resignations 
Patrolman Earle W. Elliott, resigned May 2 1924. 



Leave of Absence 
Patrolman Michael J. O'Loughlin, granted leave of absence, July 4 

to Sept. 20, 1924. 
Patrol Driver and Chauffeur, James H. White, granted leave of ab- 
sence, Nov. 1, 1924 to Jan. 31, 1925. 



Death 
Retired pensioner, John E. Fuller, died Jan. 8, 1924. 



158 



ANNUAL RBPOETS 



Appointments 

Francis R. Begley, appointed reserveman, 'May 17, 1924. 
Elmer E. G. Raymond, reinstated as patrolman. May 22, 1924. 
George D. MacDonald, reinstated as patrolman, May 22, 1924. 
George R. Estee, Jr., appointed temporary patrol driver and chauf- 
feur, Nov. 1, 1924. 



Police Signal Service 

Number of on duty calls made by the patrolmen . 
Telephone calls made by the officers and patrolmen . 



276,180 
46,025 



White Combination Automobile Service 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station . 
Number of prisoners conveyed ...... 

Number of sick and injured convej'ed 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 207.8 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 1,913.9 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail ...... 54.3 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . 656.1 



104 
114 
621 



Total number of miles run during the year . 



2,832.1 



Rco Combination Automobile Service 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners 

to station 

Number of prisoners conveyed 
Number of sick and injured conveyed . 
Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 2,804.6 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and 

injured 224.8 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail ...... 956.6 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . 1,280.6 



1,426 

1,749 

80 



Total number of miles run during the year 



5,266.6 



Touring Car Reports 

Number of prisoners conveyed to station . 
Number of sick and injured conveyed . 



116 
20 



International Harvester Co. Auto Car Reports 
Sick and injured conveyed 



CHIEF OF rOLTCE. 



159 



REPORT OF LIQUOR OFFICERS 

The following is the report of the liquor officers from 
Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1924. 

Cases investigated • • • ^^^ 

Search warrajnts served • 314 

Cases in District Court "76 

Fines imposed in District Court . 

Jail sentences imposed in District Court 



$4,950.00 
11 



Seizures 



Intoxicating liquors, gallons . 
Mash, gallons .... 

Stills 

Hydrometers .... 
Kegs, jugs, cans, bottles, etc. 
Beer cases .... 
Corks 



2,374 

305 

8 

3 

12,611 

140 

3,500 



Respectively submitted, 
Frank H. Graves and James M. Lynch, 



Sergeants. 



Report of Transfers and Sales of Motor Vehicles 
Number of licenses granted by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 

First class 

Second class ........... 

Third class . . . . . . . . 



Total 

Note: — Two licenses were revoked at the request of the per- 
sons to whom they were granted. 

Number of sales and transfers made by dealers .... 

Number of individual sales ....... \ 

Number of stolen motor vehicles reported by the several Police 
Departments, Insurance Agencies and Detective Bureaus 
in the United States and Canada . . . . . 

Number of motor vehicles recovered by above .... 

Number of index cards filed 



13 

18 

6 



37 



4,079 
2,068 



9,393 

5,390 

21,634 



Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel G. Simons,, Police Officer. 



1(K) 



ANNUAL RErORTS 



REPORT OF POLICE MATRON 

To Charles A. Kendall, Chief of Police. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit my report as matron for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1924. The following females and minors 
were placed in my care, charged with the following offenses 
etc. 



Abandonment of infant 

Adultery 

Assault .... 

Assault and battery 

Concealing personal propert)^ 

Default .... 

Demented 

Desertion of minor children 

Drunkenness 

Fornication . . 

Illegal sale of intoxicating liquor 

Keeping intoxicating liquor for 

Larceny .... 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Loitering on street . 

Lost children . 

Malicious injury to property 

Receiving stolen property 

Runaway 

Safe keeping . 

Stubbornness . .' 

Unlawfully diverting electricity 

Violation of motor vehicle laws 

Violation of probation 

Total .... 



sale 



1 
3 
3 
T 
1 
2 
& 
1 

47 
2 
2 
4 
6 
3 
2 

66 
1 
1 
1 
6 
6 
1 
4 
2 



178 



Kespectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Mina T. Webks^ Matron, 



Conclusion 

I wish to call your attention to the need of a new police 
building, the present one is in a dilapidated condition and is 
probably beyond repair for police business. 

I wish to express my sincere thanks to His Honor the 
Mayor John M. Webster, members of the board of aldermen, 
court oflQcials, heads of departments, newspaper men and mem- 
bers of this department who have all assisted me in the dis- 
charge of my duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. Kendall^ 

Chief of Police. 



CITT SOLICITOR. 161 



REPORT OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable tlie Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of 
1h(^ City of Soniei'ville : 

Tlie annual report of the law department for the year 
ending December 31, 1024, is as follows: 

An act was passed by the legislature providing that the 
biennial municipal election shall take place on the Tuesday 
next after the first Monday of November, 1925, and every 
second year thereafter, to take effect upon its acceptance by 
the board of aldermen. 

In order to secure from the state a refund of interest 
paid by the city in connection with the abolition of railroad 
grade crossings a petition was filed with the legislature by the 
city treasurer. Legislation was secured and the refund was 
made. 

A resolve was passed by the legislature for an investiga- 
tion by the division of metropolitan planning of ^^Methods and 
means for providing better and more rapid transportation 
within and for the citv of Somerville and improved facilities 
therefor.'^ 

An act was passed for the construction by the metropoli- 
tan district commission of a northern traffic route along 
Charles i-iver and througli East Cambridge and Somerville to 
the Wellington bridge over Mystic river as a "convenient and 
adequate way for motor vehicles and other traffic between 

Boston and the territory north and east thereof ". This^ 

improvement has been under consideration by the legislature 
from time to time for about thirty years. 

The county commissioners of the county of Middlesex 
made a taking of land twenty-five feet in width on the south- 
erly side of Bridge street in East Cambridge under the pro- 
visions of chapter 504- of the acts of the year 1922 for the 
purpose of widening the street. No construction work has 
been done. It is probable that the northern traffic route 
above mentioned will be laid out over the same location. 



1H2 ANNUAL RKrORTS 

Proceedings were brought in the superior court in behalf 
of sub-contractoi*s recently engaged in the erection of the 
Leonard B. Chandler schoolhouse on Marshall street, the gen- 
eral contractor having become unable to pay them in full. The 
Maryland Casualty Company as surety on the general con- 
tractor's bond was made a party to the suit and helped bring 
about an early settlement whereby the sub-contractors were 
paid their claims. 

An appeal by a member of the police department from his 
removal by the mayor and board of aldermen was tried in the 
district court of Somerville and the removal wavs sustained. 

Ralph M. Smith, Esq., as assistant in this department 
disposed of street accident claims, examined titles of land 
taken for park and playground purposes on Cherry street and 
land taken for schoolhouse purposes on Beacon street and 
made many collections by suit and othei'wise for the city treas 
urer of claims in behalf of the city coming from various de- 
partments. Two street accident cases tried by him resulted 
in verdicts against the city and are now before the supreme 
court on questions of law, both cases having been reserved by 
the justice who presided at the trial. 

Yours very i*espectfully, 
Frank W. KiLAJsr^ 

City Soluntor. 



SC II 0<> r. DEr ART M EXT. 1 (n> 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



School Committee Rooms, December 29, 1924. 

Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent of 
Schools be adopted as the annual report of the Board of 
School Committee, it being understood that such adoption 
does not commit the Board to the opinions or recommenda- 
tions made therein; that it be incorporated in the reports 
of the City Officers ; and that 1,000 copies be printed separate- 

Charles S. Clark^ 
Secretary of School Board. 



nu 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OscAK W. Codding 
Walter I. Chapman 



School Committee, 1924 



Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 



Members 

EX-OFFICIIS 

John M. Webstek. Mayor . . . . 
Lyman A. Hodgdon, President Board of 

WARD ONE 

Francis J. FiTzrATRicK 

John J. Hayes ...... 



Daniel H. Bradley 
Christopher J. Muldoon 

CiJ.\KLES W. BOYER 

Oscar W. Codding 
Katherine C. Coveney . 

WALTPHi E. WlIITTAKER . 

Harry M. Stoodlky . 
Minnie S. Turner 

Walter I. Chapman . 
Walter Frye Turner 

Herbert Cholerton 
Edwin A. Shaw 



WAI{J) TWO 



76 Boston street 
Aldermen, 8 Indiana avenue 

2 Austin street 
10 Wisconsin avenue 

19 Concord avenue 
88 Concord avenue 



WARD three 



WARD FOUR 



WARD FIVE 



WARD SIX 



WARD SEVEN 



66 Avon street 
59 Vinal avenue 

73 Marshall street 
135 Walnut street 

283 Highland avenue 
64 Hudson street 

18-A Central street 
15 Highland road 

94 College avenue 
63 College avenue 



Superintendent of Schools 
Charles S. Clark 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days^ 
and 8.30 on Saturdays. 

Superintendent's Office Force 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 
Marion E. Marshall, 30 Oilman street. 
Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln Place. 
Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Highland avenue. 
S. Regina Truelson, 38 Rogers avenue. 
Bernice F. Parker, 11 Dickson street. 



Board Meetings 

January 7 March 31 June 30 

January 28 April 28 September 29 

February 18 May 26 October 27 

8.15 o'clock 



November 24 
December 29 



SniOOI. DETAHTMENT. 105 

Standing Committees, 1924 
Note — -The member first named is chairman. 

District I. — Fitzpatrick, Hayes, Bradley. 

PRESCOTT, ITANSCOM. BENNETT 

District II. — Miildoon, Bradley, Fitzpatrick. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER 

District III. — Boyer, Codding, Muldoon. 

POPE, CIJMMTNGS 

District IV. — Coveney, Whittaker, Codding. 

EDGERLY. GLINE8 

District V. — Miss Turner, Stoodley, Coveney. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM 

District VI. — Chapman, Turner, Stoodley. 

CARR. MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL. BURNS. BROWN 

District VII. — Cholerton, Shaw, Chapman. 

HIGHLAND. CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE 

High Schools — Chapman, Stoodley, Hayes, Bradley, Codding, Whit- 
taker, Shaw. 

School Accommodations — Cholerton, Bradley, Fitzpatrick, Boyer,, 
Miss Coveney, Miss Turner, Turner, Mayor Webster, President 
Hodgdon. 

Teachers — Miss Turner, Chapman, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Codding, 
Miss Coveney, Cholerton. 

Finance — Stoodley, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Codding, Miss Coveney, 
Chapman, Cholerton, Mayor Webster, President Hodgdon. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study — Muldoon, Chapman, Hayes, Cod- 
ding, Miss Coveney, Miss Turner, Shaw. 

Industrial Education — Boyer, Muldoon, Hayes, Whittaker, Miss 
Turner, Turner, Cholerton. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics — Fitzpatrick, Boyer, Brad- 
ley, Whittaker, Stoodley, Turner, Shaw. 

Rules and Regulations — Turner, Hayes, Bradley, Boyer, Whittaker,, 
Stoodley, Shaw. 



166 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



TO THE SCHOOL CO^klMITTEE : 

Herewith I submit the Annual Report of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools for the year now closing, which becomes 
the fifty-third in the series of sucli reports made by the School 
Committee. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The membership of all the schools lias increased during 
the present year. In this ^nonth of December, the number of 
pupils in the day schools, exclusive of the Continuation 
Schools, is 14,853, a gain of 181) over the number in attendance 
at the same time hist year. This increase is in accord with 
the steady gi-owth of tlie last few years. 

It is interesting and significant to notice the distribution 
of this growth. Of this increase, 121 are in the High School, 
37 in the Junior High Schools, '21 in the Elementary Schools, 
and 10 in the Vocational School for Boys. The same report 
shows a membershi]) of 2115 in the High School with a Senior 
Class of 5.*)4 i)U])ils. This class will ])i-ol)ably graduate a larger 
numbei- of pupils than the class of 1924, which up to that time 
was the largest graduating class in the history of the school 
with the excei)ti()n of the class of 1022. As that was a double 
class, resulting from the elimination of the ninth year from 
the Grammar School, it does not count in the general trend 
of High School growth. The fact that stands out is that 
there has been a slow but steady increase in the membership 
of the High School for the last few years. Examining the re- 
ports from the Junior High Schools, we find that there is a 
growth of 37 since last year. AYhile this is relatively a small 
number, it indicates a persistency in the tendency of growth 
in the Junior High Schools as well as in the Senior High 
School. Under the conditions now existing, this tendency 
is likely to continue a few years, but with any considerable 
increase in the population of the city, the tendency will pro- 
duce larger i-esults and will be shown in increased nund)ei'S 
in both the Junior and Senior High Schools. 

WORK OF THE SCHOOLS 

it is generally conceded that education is a fundamental 
of good government. In a democracy where all political 
power is derive<l from the people through the means of uni- 



SCHOOL nKPARTMENT. 107 

versal suffrage the nature of the government, even its iier- 
petuity, is dependent upon the qualitication^ which the 
ehH'toiate possess for exercising tlic function of voting and for 
supporting the institutions of the social order resulting there- 
from. These (pnililications are determined by various agencies 
but of them all the one which the State makes compulsory 
upon all th(' youth is Education. Compulsory education is 
the means by which the State seeks to make of the boys and 
girls of today the int/:'lligent and sound voting citizenry of 
tomorrow. This being the accepted fact, it follows that edu- 
cational undertakings must be organized and conducted in 
such a manner and to such an extent as to produce the results 
expected of it. Conversely', failure to provide the organiza- 
tion and means essential to the accomplishment of these aims 
must be followed to greater or less extent by a loss in results- 
^^liat is expected of education today? Apparently 
much more than is provided for. Health, character and civic 
responsibility, knowledge, ability and willingness to do use- 
ful work, capacity to make worthy use of leisure, are all defi- 
nitely laid upon the schools today as aims to be accomplished 
in the interest alike of the individual and of society. These, 
aims involve^ many subdivisions of efforts, making a complex 
whole. But for each individual in every stage of the educa- 
tional process these are aims constantly to be sought. 

Some of these aims were in a simpler state of society 
largely the tasks of homes. But rapid changes in living Iiave 
in the last few years made necessary the transfer of these 
duties from the homes to the schools. Evidence of this fact 
abounds in current discussions. A tendency is shown to lay 
the present ills of society to failui-e of the schools. A more 
profitable and helpful course would be found in making in- 
quiry to ascertain whether society has properly equipped the 
schools for the tasks which it lays upon them. 

The school plants of former days are not adequate for 
present-day needs. They were provided when knowledge was 
the chief goal sought in the schools. A seat for every pupil 
in well vc^ntilated and lighted schoolrooms along with books 
and simple apparatus was sufficient for the needs of the times. 
More varied undertakings demand more varied ])ro visions- 
Assembly rooms, varied laboratories and shops, especially 
equipped commercial rooms, music, art, community, clinic, 
exercise rooms and playgrounds, equipment for visual, physi- 
cal, and industrial education, these are some of the additional 
provisions indicated by the present-day demands upon the 
schools. 

It should be borne in mind that the schools do not create 
these demands. The state of society, the great undertaking 



168 ANNUAL REPORTS 

of training children to be the supports of organized society, 
create them. The schools but respond to the demands to the 
extent that they are given the means for doing so. 

This transition from the simpler to a more complex organ- 
ization is of necessity accomj)anied by request for things which 
can only be furnished by appropriations of larger sums of 
money. Thus it liappens that "the schools are always asking 
for more money.'' 

Our schools are organized to meet the needs of the day. 
The recent additions to the Junior High School plants have 
done much to bring them up to a state of preparedness for 
meeting the lecpiirements of the tinu^s. The Elementary 
Scliools are in most parts of tlie city better off than ever be- 
fore. Hut the High School is seriously handicapped by lack 
of sufficient rooms, by the entire absence of provisions for some 
of the activities essential to the conduct of the educatioual 
program of a great i)resent-(1ay high school, and by the inferior 
organization of some of its work due to building limitations. 
The Boys' Vocational School ])rovides an opportunity of great 
value to mauT boys. While its offerings are now limited to 
three kinds of industrial work, other lines can be add(Hl when- 
ever the demand for them justilies such a coui*se. 

In all of these main divisions of the day schools the School 
Committee has organized the educational work so as to accom- 
plish the objectiv(=s of the new education as far as the facilities 
at its command will permit. The city has made generous provi- 
sion in recent years to ludp this work. But until the education- 
al means are ade(j[uate to the educational needs the School 
Committee should not stop making representations of needs nor 
the city stop providing for them to the extent to which the 
citizens want their schools to maintain efficiency. 

Among the newer objectives for which public opinion 
demands that the public schools shall assume responsibility 
are preparation for citizenship, inculcation of thrift, and 
X)rom()tion of health. What is being done in the schools in 
relation to each of these aims is shown in the following out- 
lines. 

a vies 

The general aim of the teaching of Civics is to give a 
pupil knowledge concerning the government and the laws under 
which he lives and by training to prepare him to discharge 
the duties im])ose<l u])on him by law. Knowledge is provided 
by instruction ; training, the application of knowledge to con- 
duct, is the more difficult thing to give as it involves provid- 
ing experiences for the pupil by means of which he may be- 
<*ome habituated in right reactions to civic duties. Such ex- 
periences the routine relations of the classroom do not provide. 



SCIKKH, DKPAiri'.NfKX'r. 169 

other activities must be employed in whieli the piiy)il takes 
a part corresponding to that which will devolve upon him 
when he leavers school. By means of such training conduct 
is motivated by right ideals and by doing the pupil is pre- 
pared to assume his share of civic responsibilities. Therefore 
training and instruction are component parts of tlie work in 
Civics throughout the whole school period. During the first 
six grades a systematic course of instruction is followed in 
which the elements of home, school and local government are 
taught. Training is given by cultivating habits of obedience 
to authority and cooperation in school relations through such 
school experiences as the teacher can make serve the purpose. 
Formal instruction in U. S. Histon, Civics, and the Consti- 
tution of the United States is given in the Junior and Senior 
High Schools, while the effort to provide training is greatly 
increased. Student participation in school affairs through 
the instrumentality of student councils and traffic squads is 
an outstanding feature of these schools. By these means pu- 
pils are given a chance to make laws for their own government 
in certain situations and to subject themselves to the enforce- 
ment of these laws by their own representatives. These 
measures are working well and will be extended as experience 
dictates and facilities will permit. 

Dental Dispensary 

A new dental dispensary was ov)ened in the Knapp 
School at the beginning of the present school year fully pro 
vided with the most modem dental furniture and appliances. 
This new equipment was purchased and given to the schools 
by the Somerville Chapter of the American Ked Cross which 
has promised in addition to this gift to maintain the dispen- 
saiy and to pay for the services of a dentist. Superior ac- 
commodations for the dispensary were made through Mayor 
We])ster's interest in the project. By his order two rooms on 
the ground floor of the Knapp School, hitherto used for stor- 
age purposes only, were during the i^mmer vacation made 
over to meet the needs of the dispensaiy. Extensive carpen- 
ter, plumbing, steam fitting and painting work was done 
before the equipment was installed. When finished the dis- 
pensary consisted of a pleasant reception room and operating 
room both furnished with everything needed to make the enter- 
lirise successful. For this addition to the resources of the 
schools credit is due to Francis A. Ryan, Chairman of the 
Somerville Chapter of American Red Cross, who not only 
made the offer on behalf of the Red Cross but also spent a 
good deal of time in studying the quastion of school dental 
dispensaries and in selecting and securing suitable equip 
ment for the proposed new one in Somerville, 



170 AXXIAL Ki:i'(jRTS 

Service in the new dispensary, like that at the dental 
dispensary in the Proctor School, is furnished during the fore- 
noon of every school day. One half of the schools sends 
pupils to the Knapp dispensary, the other half to the Proctor. 
Benefits fi*oin dental treatment to school ])ui)ilK have thus 
been doubled by the opening of this new dispensary. This 
result is gratifying because it increases the elficiency of the 
work of the schools in a held wherein the City of Somerville 
was a pioneer, the dental dispensary at the Proctor opened in 
1910, being one of the first to be established in connection 
with ])ublic scliools by any coiinniniity in tlie state. 

Thriif 

Tlie objective world in which the child of today lives is 
one of prodigal spending. Allurements for jxM-sonal indnl- 
genc(^ which c(^st money strike him on evi^-y side. Among all 
these (^idences of the prevalence of the disposition to spend 
money freely without i-egard tor the futnre, few indeed and 
feeble ;n-e efforts made to cnltivate in him a power of self- 
restraint which will enabU^ him to withstand present tem])ta- 
tions for the sake of fntnre security ami ])ros])erity. TluM-e 
has. however, been snilicient ])nblic recognition of the dangers 
of tlie i)resent situation to im])ose the demand upon the public 
schools to inclnde the inculcation of the habit of thrift among 
its objectives. Onr scliools liave for a nundxM- of years l)een 
doing a quiet but useful work in teaching saving. Recently in 
response to the urgency of the needs these eft'orts have been 
increased with the result that the present school bank system 
has attained results which compare favorably with the ac- 
complishments of public schools anywhere. Not content with 
the extent to which pres(»nt conditions of teaching thrift can 
produce efiiciency, the School Committee has during the pres- 
ent year studied various plans for improvement. To extcMul 
instruction in thrift so as to train every ])upil in the right 
use of his (M-onomic resources retiuires additions to our present 
ways and means for liandling the subject. The best plan to 
adopt foi* this purpose is what the School Committee is now 
conc(uiiing its(»lf to tind. 

Health 

A yearly physical examination of the pupils has Ix^en 
und(M' consideration of the Standing Committee on Health. 
Physical Training, and Athletics during the year. Such an 
examination is required by law and the Department of Educa- 
tion has ])rovi(1ed forms for ke(»i)ing a cumulative record of 
the exanrinations of each pupil. The pur])oses of the examina- 
tions are to discover any defects likely to interfere with school 
work, to furnish information bv means of which the health 



SCn(K)L DKrART.MKNT. 171 

of pupils may be safeguarded and improved, and to furnisli 
data for comparisons of the pupiPs development from year to 
year. \Miile Ww Committee hasS approved in principle the 
making of these examinations yearly, it has not yet been able 
to conduct them because of lack of means. As a small sum 
would be sutKicient to provide the things needed for this work, 
a beginning slu)uld be made during the coming year. 

I^afe 1 1/ E du oa I io u 

Preservation of life has become a new talk of the schools. 
The alarming increase in accidents and fatalities due to 
dangers incident to present day conditions has become a mat- 
ter of local, state, and national concern. Everywhere meas- 
nres to promote the safety of life are being adopted. In ac- 
cordance with this wide-spread feeling the Somerville Safety 
Council was formed early in the year to combat the dangers 
which abound in our streets and to promote among all classes 
of people a sense of caution which woubl serve as a protection 
from these dangei^. Among the first of its acts was a request 
for the schools to train pupils to avoid these risks and to aid 
in the campaign for safety. In response to this request a 
campaign of safety education was immediately begun in the 
schools by authority of the School Committee. Before the 
close of the school year in June all the pupils in the city had 
been reached by lectures and moving pictures given by repre- 
sentatives of the Massachusetts Safety Council. Junior Safe- 
ty Councils have been formed in many schools and constant 
etfort is being made to train pupils to look out for the dangers 
which threaten them in the streets and elsewhere. Particu- 
larly has an effort been made to keep them from playing in the 
streets. In this matter as in some of the other educational 
attempts the aim has been to get pupils to cooperate among 
themselves in the work of promoting habits of care and avoid- 
ance of danger. This work is well under way and will be- 
come more effective as it becomes better organized. 

ACCOM IVIODATIONS 

In January of this year the new Junior High School 
building on Marshall street was completed and it was occupied 
for the first time on March 3, 1024. The building was form- 
ally dedicated to school uses in a meeting held on the evening 
of May 14, 1924. The program for this meeting was in charge 
of Mayor John M. Webster and the Committee on Public 
Property of the Board of Aldermen under whose care the 
building had been constructed. This meeting marked the 
successful accomplishment of one of the most important build- 
ing projects ever undertaken by the City. It is the largest 



172 ANNUAL REPORTS 

school biiiidiiig ever planned for and built in Somerville. It 
is of fii'st-class construction and is beautiful withiw and with 
out. it was planned to contain the maximum of educational 
features with a minimum of waste space. Put in another 
way. the building gives the largest educational service in 
variety of activities provided for and in the number of pupils 
accommodated which could be obtained from its cubage. After 
being ])ut to the test ol' occupancy for nearly a year, the 
building has fully justiticd all of the hopes which careful 
planning had in view. Unstinted praise has been bestowed 
upon it by the numerous visitors who have come from far and 
near to inspect the building and to see the school. It is an 
outstanding example of the wise use of public money in ac- 
complishing a large educational ])roject with economy and 
efticiency. 

Several imporlant cliaugcs in the use of school buildings 
liave followed the ()])ening of this new building. The build- 
ings formerly occupied by the Northern and Eastern Junior 
High Schools were made available for other jjurposes. The 
I*rescott and Sonthworth buildings were filled by classes trans- 
ferred from the Edgerly and (Tlines Schools. Three rooms 
in the Edgerly School are used now for elementary classes 
but it is i)roposed to abandon them for elementary school pur- 
poses at the close of the present school year. As the result 
of these changes consequent upon the use of the new school 
building, the elementary school organization formerly housed 
in the Ivlgerly School has now a much better home. While 
it is one of the older buildings, the rooms of the Prescott 
School are large and pleasant. The btiilding is substantially 
constructed. The Sonthworth building is new and has a room 
which can be used as an assembly hall. The two buildings 
are connected and are easily operated as a unit. By the trans- 
fer to this group of buildings the Edgerly School organization 
has secured more and better rooms, has a location quieter and 
more i^moved from the dangerous trafitic of Cross Street, and 
has the advantage of an assembly room, a workshop, and a 
kitchen. Eight rooms in the Forster School are now occupied 
by elementary classes and a part of the Folsom School build- 
ing is used by the Continuation School which was transferred 
to it from the High School in September. 

HUfh School 

Attention should now be given to plans foi- improving 
high school conditions. The present accommodations are in- 
adtHjuate both in respect to the number of pupils and in respect 
to proper provisions for the activities of the school. More 
rooms of various kinds are needed. 



sc iiooi- nKi'Ain.M i;.\'r, ITo 

An exercise room or gyiniuisiuni large enough to provide 
suitable indoor i)lay space for boys and girls is a conspicuous 
Vieed. For years the School Committee has been urging this 
necessity upon the attention of the public. The reasons for 
making this request now are more pressing than ever before. 
The two thousand boys and girls of the High School are eager 
to have an indoor place where they can conduct their physical 
exercises and sports. Consideration for the physical develop- 
ment of these 3'outh as well as for their enjoyment of athletics 
makes the providing of a gymnasium for the High School in 
the near future a measure of civic duty. At present the 
High School plant is the result of building at various times 
additions sulticient only for the minimum uchmI oI' the time. 
The stiucture as a whole is so diverse in its parts as to be 
lacking in the unity of plan which would characterize a new 
building. Therefore further additions to include the desired 
features should be made only after a careful examination of 
the whole plant and a determination as to the best way of 
making changes and additions necessary to bring the facilities 
up to modern standards. 

Southern Junior High School 

Although this plant was enlarged in 1923 the additions 
then made were not deemed to be sufficient to provide all the 
additional accommodations needed for that school. Unlike 
the Western and Northeastern Junior High Schools the South- 
ern has no large assembly room. Such a room and additional 
classrooms should be provided for this school in the near 
future. 

Boys' Vocational School 

» During the past year the Somerville Chamber of Com- 
merce has petitioned the School Committee for an enlargement 
of the activities of this school. Such enlargement cannot be 
made without additional space for the school. Whether such 
space should be secured by additions to the present building 
or by taking the Edgerly School for this work is a matter 
which should be carefully considered. 

Further Frovisions for Physical Education 

It is conceded that health is one of the lirst objectives 
of education. For growing youth physical evercises and play 
are nature's means of promoting physical development and 
maintaining bodily health. The importance of this subject 
is recognized in the laws of the State which now make physical 
education a required subject in school programs. The schools 
are prepared to furnish instruction in this subject but to do 
so to an adequate extent they must have the necessary means. 



174 ANNI AT. REPORTS 

AYhat is needed now is additional space indoors and outdoors 
where free exercises and plav may be conducted under the di- 
rection of the schools. Such indoor free exercise rooms should 
be provided in the near future for the three junior high 
schools as well as for the high school. As we are situated, 
adequate outdoor play space cannot be had in proximity to 
the High Scliool or to thc" Southern or ^'ortheastern Junior 
High Schools. Kut fortunately this defect can measurably 
be remedied by impiovements at Dilboy Field Avhich would 
make that large area a positive force in the city's educational 
work. A honse located on tliis field, containing suitable and 
adequate provision of lockers, showers, and dressing rooms, 
would make etfective for our youth, as well as for citizens 
generally, what is now chiefly a potential asset. i*robably of 
all the things indicated in this report as being nettled for the 
welfare of the youth, the building of such a field house would 
furnish immediately the most benefit to the lai'gest number, 
for the smallest outlay of money. 

TEACHERS 

Changes in the teaching corps have been no more than 
usual but have been enough to cause consid^irable loss, tem 
porarily, at least, to teaching efficiency and to creat(^ a ditVi- 
cult problem for the administration. There are two sources 
of supply for tilling vacancies. The first is the group of Som- 
erville graduates of State Normal schools or colleges who have 
served the probationary year provided by the Kules and Kegu- 
lations of the School Committee. The second is the field of 
experienced teachers who will leave their positions to come 
to Somerville. The cadet group is limited to twelve ])ersons 
in any one year. This group is too small to fill all the vacan- 
cies and it does not contain a sufficient range of (pialilications 
to provide candidates for all kinds of teaching positions. Al- 
though cadets must spend one year teaching in our schools 
under supervision before they can be appointed, they are at 
the time of beginning work as regular teachers relatively in- 
experienced. While it is good policy for a school system to 
train in service some of its own young teachers who have had 
an approved professional education, it should not attempt to 
do this work for a larger number than its supervisory force 
can adequately manage. Our practice is safe and sound for 
our present conditions but it would be unwise to try to <lo 
much more under them. Since this is so, it becomes neces- 
sai-y therefore to fill many vacancies with teachers taken from 
other communities. Our exactions of qualifications are se- 
vere. The standards of our schools are high. Our patrons 
want the best. Successful teachers are diligently sought for 



SCHOOL DKl'Airi'.MKX'l". 175 

the vacancies in oui- schools, l)iit tlie disparity which at one 
tinu* existed l)etweeii the salaries of onr scliools and those of 
tlie schools of other conininiiities has <>;enerally disa})[)eared 
and witli it the indncement for successful teachers to change 
io come to ns. This condition is making the securing of new 
teachers increasingly difficult. Successful teachers of two 
or three years' experiejice generally are receiving a hundred 
dollars more than our salary schedule allows for those years, 
even in places where the obtainable maximum is lower than 
ours. Teachers are prone to ])refer a larger sum in hand to 
a smaller one, even though in the latter case a higher ultimate^ 
maximum is assured. 

The situation which alTects us is shared by neighboring 
communities. The limited supply of teachers, the preying 
of one community upon another, the response of the teaching 
personnel to the lure of higher pay elsewhere, all combine to 
compel a conununity either to pay salaries sufficient to get 
the kind of teachers it wants or to accept such teachers as its 
salary schedule will attract. 

During the year twenty-six teachers resigned, seven to be 
married, three to study, three to enter business, one to go to 
the schools of Boston, and twelve for other reasons. 

Thirty-seven teachers were elected during the year and 
assigned as follows: High School 2, Junior High schools 18, 
Elementary Schools 21, and Continuation School 1. 

IMPROVEMENT PLAN 

In order to encourage the professional improvement of 
teachers in service, the School Committee at its regular meet- 
ing on December 31, 11)23, adopted a plan for additional pay 
to teachers who will pursue approved courses of study. The 
provisions of this plan are shown in the following report from 
the Committee on Finance which was presented at that meet- 
ing and was adopted by the School Committee: 

This Committee has given careful and long attention to 
the question of increase of salary in our schools. It has 
voted to report to the School Committee recommendations as 
follows : — 

1. The adoption of a scheme of salary increments to 
be earned by professional study amounting in all to |300, di- 
vided into four increments of f 75 each. 

This salary plan has been in operation for a number of 
years in Quincy and Haverhill. Representatives of the Fi- 
nance Committee have studied the plan in both places. 

2. The granting of an addition of ."f^lOO to the maximum 
of Junior High School teachers, raising it from |1,500 to 
$1,000; effective Jannarj^ 1, 1924. 



176 ANNUAL RErORTS 

^>. Tho i;raiitiiig of an addition of ^MH) to the inaxlinuiii 
of Juiuor High Scliool teiicliers who are college graduates, 
ill service or to be elected, raising their maximum from ft, 600 
to 11.700; eftective January 1, 1924. 

Applying the above, the situation will be as follows : — 

Elementary teachers will have a basal maximum, of 
1 1,500, with an obtainable promotional maximum of |1,800. 

Junior High School teachers, not college graduates, will 
have a basal maximum of |1,600, with an obtainable promo- 
tional maximum of f 1,900. 

Junior High School teachers, college graduates, will have 
a basal nuiximum of |1,700, with an obtainable promotional 
maximum of |2,000. 

High school women will have a probable basal maximum 
of f?l,750, with an obtainable promotional maximum of ,|2,050. 

High school men teachers will have a probable basal 
maximum of $2,500, with an obtainable promotional maximum 
of 12,800. 

Outlines of a Plan for Additional Pay for Accredited 
Professional Study 

To give encouragement for professional improvement of 
teachers in the service by means of extended study, additions 
to the salary schedule are proposed, to be made in accordance 
with the provisions noted below : 

1. Any teacher who presents evidence to the Superin- 
tendent of having complied with the conditions hereafter 
stated, shall receive increase in salary as herein ])rovided. 

2. Increments of pay will be voted by the School Com- 
mittee, amounting to |3()0 for 360 college hours Qf professional 
study, approved by the Superintendent of Schools. The sum 
will be divided into units of .'j>75 for 90 college hours of such 
professional study. 

3. Courses of study to entitle a non-college graduate 
in the elementary or junior high schools to credit must be 
courses in advance of those recpiired for graduation in a high 
school or normal school. In the case of college graduates in 
the junior high schools, and all high school teachers, courses 
of study must be of a college post-graduate nature. 

4. Courses must be such as are given by colleges of 
approved standing with credit towards degrees, unless for 
special reasons tlie Superintendent excepts from this require- 
ment a sp(H-ilic course, and must be approved in writing in 
advance by the Superintendent. 

5. No credit will be allowed except upon presentation 
of a passing mark obtained in the course. 

6. Credit may be obtained either through extension 



sciidoi, i>Ki'Airr.\i K\'i\ 17T 

course, certain approved correspondence combes, or summer 
courses carried on at such time and in such manner as not to 
interfere with the daily work of teaching. 

7. Of each 1)0 college houi*s at least two-thirds shall be 
of a professional nature. A college hour is defined as a class 
period accompanied by a collateral preparation, reading, and 
researcli. 

8. Only one increment of ^7d shall be made in any one 
year. 

!). Only work to an extent of 60 college hours may be 
undertaken during the school year. 

10. Increments of pay earned by professional study a& 
hereinbefore defined shall be voted by the School Committee 
in ]May and 8eptend)er and paid on the teachers' pay roll of 
the following month. 

1 1 . This ])lan of increments earned by professional study 
shall be put into operation February 1, 1924. 

Tn the meeting of May 2(1 the School Committee voted : 

To amend Section 2 of the Outline for Professional Im- 
provement by the addition of the following words : "Or into 
units of .^50 for GO college hours of such professional study on 
application of the teacher." 

To consider in interpreting the plan of promotion credits 
the vacation period as a pait of the i)receding year; provided, 
however, that credits earned after the close of the school year 
shall be cumulative and may stand to the teacher's credit 
in the following year; provided, also, that in determining 
credits tlie term "year" shall be construed as tlie twelve 
months fi-om September 1 to August ;:>1 inclusive. 

Tlie Committee also recommends that tlte action herein- 
reported be adopted as the policy of the School Committee 
upon these matters, effective tlie date of the adoption of the 
promotional system. 

Before February 1, li)21, the Superintendent had pre- 
pared two forms to be used as lecords in the management of 
this business. The first is the Application Form to be made 
out in duplicate, one copy to be kept by the teacher and the 
other to remain as a permanent record in the oftice of the 
Superintendent of Schools. The second form is a card which 
is intended to record all the principal facts concerning all 
the courses taken by a teacher until the maximum credit of 
|300 has been secured. By these forms a })erman(^nt history 
of each application is made, thereby furnishing a means of 
])rotecting the teacher's interest as well as providing an ac- 
<'urate stateinent of the School Committee's liability. 

Teachers have taken advantage of this provision by ap- 
plying foi- approval of courses of study to be pursued in vari- 



178 ANNl^\L REPORTS 

ous educational institutions. Before the close of the last 
school year two courses of. jjrofessioual work for the benefit 
of teachers were conducted in Sonierville under the direction 
of the Superintendent of Schools. 

As a result of this professional study, the School Com- 
mittee in the September meeting voted increments of $75 to 
the salaries of o2 teachers and increments of f 50 to the salaries 
of 35 teachers. 

Since the opening of schools in Se])tember four courses 
of professional study have been conducted in Sonierville under 
the direction of the Superintendent of Schools. These courses 
are as follows : 

Primary Work, by Mabel C. Bragg, Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Newton. 

English, by Grace M. Miller, A. A., Private Instructor. 

Arithmetic, by Olive A. Kee, teacher in the Boston Nor- 
mal School. 

Voice Placement and Reading, Harriet M. Bell, teacher 
in the Somerville High School. 

In addition to these professional undertakings teachers 
are pursuing study in various professional schools and in other 
approved ways. At the close of 1924 over 800 courses have 
been approved, some of which have been comj^leted, while the 
rest are under way. 316 different teachers out of a total of 
445 have taken one or more courses. 513 applications have 
been approved for teachers who are now carrying on the 
courses of study therein defined. 

The number of teachers making application for recogni- 
tion of improvement study in each of several professional in- 
stitutions is shown below : 



'The Somerville School Committee . . 
Boston University ..... 
Harvard Graduate School of Education 
University Extension .... 
Boston College ..... 

Pitchburg Normal School 
Columbia University .... 

University of Chicago .... 

University of Maine 

Massachusetts Normal Art School . 

All other ....... 



267 

252 

52 

133 

8 
5 
5 

4 
3 
5 

77 



The professional improvement of teachers in service is 
generally recognized as one of the most important phases of 
the present-day conduct of schools. The scientific study of 
education during the last few years by psychologists, medical 
men, college professors of education, social philosophers, and 
men and women engaged actively in the work of teaching, has 
produced a body of professional knowledge in theory and prac 



srirOOl. DKl'AKTMKN'T. 179 

tice relating to teaching and the administration of education 
which has raised this undertaking from the level of a busi- 
ness to that of a ])rofession. Empirical teaching must now 
give way to scientific teaching. Initial professional training 
mTist be followed by continued professional study. And as the 
doctor or the lawyer gains economically by the post-gra.duate 
studies essential to the maintenance of his professional stand- 
ing and the increase of his professional skill, vso should the 
teacher have the encouragement and reward for such profes 
sional efforts by additi(mal salary allowances especially pro 
vided therefoi'. 

COST 

The maintenance of the public schools is one of the most 
important enterprises in which any community engages. 

By reason of its size and the character of the provisions 
which must be made for its successful carrying on, this un- 
dertaking is one of the most costly of all the public works. 
It is necessary, therefore, that the management of the public 
schools should at all times have in mind an obligation to make 
a wise and prudent use of public money in administering the 
trusts confided to it. 

In this spirit the School Committee has at all times con 
ducted its business. It has striven to make good schools for 
the children of the city, and to do this with snch an economi- 
cal use of the money as is dictated by the resources of our 
city. An examination of the facts of the case will show how 
well the School Committee has succeeded in this effort. 

The unit of cost is the individual child. The pupils 
withdrawing either by graduation or by leaving school at 
the (^nd of the period when attendance is compulsory are more 
than offset by those taken in as beginners and as new-comere. 
There is, therefore, in our city a growth in the total number 
of children to be educated in the public schools. Correspond- 
ingly there is a growth in the expense of education as a con- 
vseipience of the increase in membership. Other factors, how- 
ever, enter into the matter to swell the cost of education. 
Increased activities, increase in the pay of individual work- 
ers, and increases in the market price of supplies from time 
to time, all combine continually to raise the total of expendi- 
tures for the maintenance of the schools. Such increase in 
the cost of education is inevitable if the schools are to un- 
dertake the program of modern education which the present 
state of society demands. 

During the present fiscal year the total cost for the 
maintenance of the schools was more than during the pre- 



ISO ' AN NT A I. UK I 'OUTS. 

ceding year. In the part of the educational enterprise con- 
trolled by the School Committee, namely — Teachei*s' ^^alaries 
and School Supplies, the increase in cost has been ^22,753.20. 

All things considered, this is relatively an insignificant 
inci-ease. 

The total cost of education for the children of Somer- 
ville in the last analysis must be the pi-odnct of the amcmnt 
spent for a single pupil multiplied by the total number of 
children educated. While Somerville is the tenth city in popu- 
lation it is the eighth city in tlie number of children in the 
public scliools. Therefore, one would ex])ect Somerville to be 
the eighth city in the gross amount of money expended for 
the education of its children. As a matter of fact, it is the 
niiitli according to the re])ort of the Department of Educa- 
tion for the school year ending June 30, 1924. But another 
way of measuring the cost of our schools is to compare the 
amount expended on an individual pupil with the amount 
expended thereon by other communities. According to the 
report above quoted the per capita cost of the schools in our 
city for the last school year was |65.72. Of the 39 cities of 
Massachusetts 32 had a higher per capita cost, the highest 
being 1116.34. Only six had a lower per capita expenditure 
than Somerville, the lowest beting .f62.37. From this state- 
ment it is to be seen that Somerville spent on each child in 
tlie average membershii) only .s:>.3r) more than the lowest city, 
while it has spent .1^50.02 less than the highest. 

The details of receipts and expenditures are fully set 
forth in statistical tables which accompany this report. 

CONCLUSION 

Unusual improvements to the cause of education in Som- 
erville have been made during the present year. These have 
been in part improvements in accommodations and in part im- 
provements in the organization of the school undertakings. 
The teaching force has worked with enthusiasm and efficiency. 
The schools are in better condition now because of the ac- 
complishments which have taken place during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark, 
December 29, 1924. Superintendent of Schools. 



SCFiOOI. DEPARTMENT. 181 

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE HIGH SCHOOL 

.Taniiarj 1, 11)25 

Mr. Chai-U's kS, Clark 
Su]>erint('iHleiit of Soliools 
Sompr\ille. Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

You have asked ine to state the present condition of 
our high school bnikling and to explain what is needed to 
put it on a parity with modern high schools built to meet 
the requirements of the latest and be>5t in secondary educa- 
tion. A high school building to be all-round efficient should 
fullil live purposes : — first, to house the pupils and their 
property in a comfortable and safe manner; second, to give 
facilities for efficient instruction in all subjects taught; third, 
to fuiTiish means for a systematic health education ; fourth, 
to provide rooms for the extra curriculum activities of the 
pupils ; and fifth, to supply proper facilities for the accommo- 
dation and comfort of the teachers. I shall take each in some 
detail, using as a numerical basis an enrollment of 2500 pu- 
pils. (We have at present 2200 and have been steadily grow- 
ing) 

Fi/rst, to house the pupils and to take care of their prop- 
erty while in attendance. Each pupil is entitled to a desk 
in a room called a home room. In this desk he may keep his 
books and other materials for his work. Each piipil is en- 
titled to a space properly protected, in which he may place 
his coat, hat, and other articles used while coming to and 
returning fi-oui school. This spjice in all modern buildings 
takes the form of an individual locker or of a portion of a 
locked room. Pupils have a right to sufficient and properly 
equipped toilets. Tliese toilets should be placed on each floor, 
should be light, well- ventilated and neat. At the present 
time our school has home room seatings for less than 1600 
pupils, has no protected means for caring for w^earing ap- 
parel, and has inadecpiate and poorly ventilated toilets. 

Secondy to meet the needs for academic instruction. If 
some of the home rooms are large enough to be used effiective- 
ly as study rooms, smaller rooms equipped with arm-chairs 
should be supplied for teaching small groups of pupils. Five, 
at least, of such rooms are needed. To take care, properly, 



182 AXNTAL Ri:r(JRTS. 

of the number .studying the sciences, the following labora- 
tories ai-e needed, — three chemical, two physical, a biological, 
a botanical with an adjacent greenhouse, a geological, and 
an astronomical laboratory. If lecture facilities cannot be 
provided in these laboratories, four separate lecture rooms 
are necessary. We now have two chemical, one physical and 
one biological laboratory with two lecture rooms. In addi- 
i'lou to rlie one manual training room — lathe room — which we 
now have, there should be rooms for advanced carpentry, 
metal working, and forging. 

In the household arts department, there is need of spe- 
cial rooms for various phases of the work such as millinery, 
nursing, fitting, etc., with a well-equipped suite of rooms for 
the proper teaching of home making. 

The libraries of the school are small and inadequate. 
Two large well-lighted libraries are essential. 

Our present assembly hall is large and attractive. A 
smaller hall to accommodate about 500 is much needed for 
the assembling of smaller groups. 

Thirds to furnish facilities for systematic health educa- 
tion. This phase of our work is of two types, — to care for 
and to impi*ove the condition, of those not well and to im- 
prove the physical condition of all. Well -equipped small hos- 
pital rooms with triained nurses are now found in most large 
and many small school's. These rooms are needed for emer- 
gencies and slight illnesses and would save many unnecessary 
absences from school. We have now one matron and an en- 
tirely inadequate room. The need for a gymnasium is patent. 
We have no means for proper physical training in the school. 
This gymnasium should be large enough to be converted 
into two, with running track and adjacent to it locker rooms 
and shower baths. 

Fourth, to give rooms for the worth while extra curricu- 
lum activities of tlie school such as music, journalism, debat- 
ing, dramati(*s, specialized clubs, etc. All of these require 
rooms of special character, — rehearsal rooms, instrument 
store rooms, scliool paper office. At the present time most 
of these activities ai*e conduc^ted m places ill-fitted for the 
purpose. 

Fifth, to accommodate the simplest needs of the teach- 
ers. Teachei*s are entitle<i to dressing rooms easil}^ i*eached, 
with sufficient toilc^ts, and in case of need, with rest rooms 
furnished with ordinary comforts. Rooms for teachers are 
at present lamentably insufficient and inadequately equipped. 

r have not attempted to enumerate in minute detail 
everv need of our scho<d, but rather to touch on the ej^sential«. 



SCHOOL DKrARTMENT. 183 

We are conducting n largo school under great disadvan- 
tages, — a handicap which will hamper the school more and 
nion* in the future unless some speed j means can be devised 
to ameliorate the present unsatisfactory situation. 

Ver^^ truly yours. 

John A. Avkry^ 

Head Master. 



184 AWIAI. RKI'Oin'S. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE CONTINUATION 
SCHOOLS AND AMERICANIZATION WORK 



January 1, 1925 

Mr. Charles S. Clark 
Superintendent of SK^hools 
Somerville, Massachusetts ' . 

Dear Mr. Clark: 

T lierevvitli submit a report of the Continuation Schools 
tind Aniericnnizntion classes for the year 1024. 

CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

^Vhen these schools were established in Se])tember 1920 
it was deemed advisable, on account of the uncertainty of the 
problem, to house them in the Hi^h School building where 
overhead expense would be held at a minimum and equip- 
ment and tools could be made available by joint usage with 
the Hi|L»;h Scliool classes. As I stated in my last report, the Con- 
tinuation School, liaving passed through its period of experi- 
mentation, has earned its place as a bridge between the con- 
ventional schools and employment. It has brouglit with it 
a certain methodology which will of necessity always have 
a place in the school system even should the Continuation 
School eventually b(^ legislated out of existence. 

Believing that this type of school is worth while, pur- 
poseful, and a necessary part of the school system it was 
stated in your last report that as soon as circumstances per- 
mit, this school should be withdrawn from its present unsuit- 
able location in the High School Building and placed in rooms 
where its work can be done under conditions as favorable as 
those provided for other day schools. 

In S<^ptember at the beginning of the fifth year of its 
existence, the school was moved to the Folsom Building, 
^vhere accommodations were nuide available by the opening 
^sometime previously) of the Leonard B. Chandler Building. 
The sho])s were i-etinished, making bright, sunny, comfortable 
Tooms in which to carry on the woodworking and sheet metal 
work. The rooms for cooking, dressmaking, millinery and 
home nursing as well as the academic and related work rooms 
are in good repair and with the shops furnish accommoda- 



?<<'n(H>I, DKrARTMKN'r. 185 

tioiis which compare favorably with like schools thi^nighoiit 
the State. 

The (V)iitimuiti()ii School now is a unit by itself and al- 
ready the j)iipils have shown a marked increase in interest in 
the school and its work, attendance has been improved, and 
our instructors find it much easier to make suitable contacts 
with the home. It is now possible to have daily assembly 
periods and further some social phases of tlie work which 
ali'ord opportunity for pupil participation. 

T hope that in the near future it will be possible to 
obtain some woodworking machinery, that we may continue 
our shopwork on the factory plan. 

The Somerville Chapter, American Red Cross is prepar- 
ing to furnish a fine ecpiiijuient for the Home Nursing course 
which is taken by every girl in the school. 

Our productivity returns to the State Dept. of Educa- 
tion will no doubt be decreased this year due to the fact that 
so much time has been spent by both boys and girls in fitting 
up their work rooms. 

A change in the teaching force was made necessary by 
the transfer of Miss Estelle Crowe to the High School. Miss 
Marion H, Hathaway is doing a tine piece of work and her 
very successful contacts with the homes show the possibilities 
of the follow u|) system. 

In connection with the work of a group of Superintend- 
ents who are making a comprehensive study of School and 
Age Requirements, it has been a pleasure during the past 
year for our corps to make a survey of the Somerville Continu- 
ation School. It will be of interest to note the following 
items gathered from our survey. 

Our boys this year are employed in twenty-eight different 
occupations, each one being given by from one to eight boys. 
The girls represent twenty-five occupations including house- 
work, which is carried on by eleven girls. 

Vocational preferences expressed by this group show that 
practically all the boys tend toward the mechanical trades, 
while the girls prefer commercial work. 

The reasons for leaving school were obtained by a study 
of answers to a carefully supervised questionnaire. 

Girls Boys Both 

A. Economic Conditions** . . *64.0% 35.8% 47.5% 

R. Conditions in the Schools . 10.3% 37.5% 26.3% 

C. Personal feelings of child or 

attitude of parent . 15.4% 17.9% 16.8% 

D. Vocational opportunity offered 10.3% 8.8% 9.4% 
* 30% of the girls hold Home Permits which are usually issued 

only in case of economic need. 

** Economic necessity is defined as actual need at the home for 



186 



AX X U A L REPORTS. 



the added income which the minor can make to secure a reasonable 
standard of living. 

These geoeral reasoDs f(>r leaving school are subdivided 

as follows : 







Girls 


Boys 


Both 


A-l. 


Illness at home 


10.2% 


0.0 


4.2% 


2. 


Death of Parent 


12.8% 


10.8% 


11.6% 


3. 


Parent unable to secure work 


0.0 


1.8% 


1.1% 


4. 


Needed to work at home 


25.6% 


1.8% 


11.6% 


5. 


Family troubles 


2.6% 


7.1% 


5.3% 


6. 


Small family income not 










caused by above reasons 


12.8% 


14.3% 


13.7% 




Totals 


64.0% 


35.8% 


47.5% 




Conditions in the schools 


Girls 


Boys 


Both 


B-1. 


Slow progress in school 


2.6% 


7.1% 


5.3% 


2. 


Discipline in school 


0.0 


3.5% 


2.0% 


3. 


Dismissed or discharged from 










Disciplinary School 


a.o 


1.8% 


1.1% 


4. 


"Too big" to go to school 


0.0 


1.8% 


1.1% 


6. 


Dislike of school not caused 










by above reasons 


5.1% 


19.7% 


13.7% 


6. 


Left school on teacher's ad 










vice .... 


2.6% 


1.8% 


2.0% 


7. 


Advice of friends . 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


8. 


Absence from school 


0.0 


1.8% 


1.1% 




Totals . . . . 


10.3% 


37.5% 


26.3% 




Personal feelings of child or 










attitude of parents 


Girls 


Boys 


Both 


C-1. 


Personal illness 


0.0 


1.8% 


1.1% 


2. 


Have sufficient education, com 
pleted course in Trade 










School or Business College 


0.0 


3.5% 


2.1% 


3. 


Desire for spending money 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


4. 


Did not wish to enter nev\ 










school 


2.6% 


5.4% ^ 


4.2% 


5. 


Required to leave by parents 


5.1% 


0.0 


2.1% 


6. 


Change of residence 


0.0 


5.4% 


3.1% 


7. 


Influenced by friend's Em 










ployment 


0.0 


1.8% 


1.1% 


8. 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


7.7% 


0.0 


3.1% 




Totals 


15.4% 


17.9% 


16.8% 




Vocational opportunity offer< 


?d Girls 


Boys 


Both 


D-1. 


Work out of school hours led 










to good position on full time 


! 2.6% 


3.5% 


3.1% 


2. 


Work during vacation led 










etc. .... 


0.0 


l.S 


1.0% 


3. 


Received oflfer of good posi 










tion . . . . . 


7.7% 


3.5% 


5.3% 




Totals 


10.3% 


8.8% 


».4% 



The Educational accomplishmeut of the 14-16 year olfl 
employed minoi-s as shown by the certiticates issued over a 
period of the last three years is as follows : 



S(MIOOL F)KrAKTMKNT. 1 ST 

.67% completed less than 4 grades 

1.36 left after completing Grade 4] 

5.00 " " " " 5 \ Elementary School 

30.00 " " " " 6 j 

24.00 " .....' 7 ] 

21.80 " " " " S \^ Junior High School 

13.00 " " '* " 9 I 

3.40 " " " " 10 ] 

.67 " " " " 11 [ Senior High School 

.10 " " " " 12 J 

In order to gain evidence as to the extent Continuation 
Schools have contributed to supply education which brought 
certain types of results, a canvass has been made of our first 
class, those who attended our school during 1920-1921. 

From 72 replies the following is i*evealed: 

32% had been able to secure a higher grade of employment and 
consequently higher wages through their Continuation School work. 

25% had secured higher earning capacity without a change to 
higher grade employment. 

26.4% admitted changed interests in life and 

16.6% had been influenced to make better use of their leisure 
time. 

The shifting in industry so noticeable befoi*e the age of 
16 seems to l>ecome more stable after 16, a« evidenced by the 
following : 

19.2% have worked on the same job since becoming 16. 

49.0% have made one change " " 16. 

23.4% have made two changes " " 16. 

4.3% have made three changes " " 16. 

Only 1 has made four changes " " 16. 

Only 1 has made five changes " " 16. 

All of the 1920-21 group reached were heartily in favor 
of the Continuation school and its work, and hoped that the 
require<l four hour*s a week attendance can soon be increased. 

AMERICANIZATION CLASSES 

Heretofore the work in Americanization has been mere- 
ly scratching the surface of the problem becauvse we believed, 
and rightly, that the first step in the process of American- 
izing must be in the direction of providing a common tongue. 
Our classes are designed eventually to solve the great problem 
of moulding the foreign born element into capable citizens 
of our great Republic. 

Learning the language of our country and becoming 
naturalized does not necessarily make true Americans. As 
we know, many a fine American citizen whose heart beats true 
to the ideals of America, speaks broken English, while many 
an enemy of all that America stands for speaks our language 
fluently. 



188 ANNTAI^ FM'.l'ORTS. 

Our task tlicii is iniu^li ln-oadcM* lluiii uicrc (Mincatioii and 
naturalization, important as they are. Our duty will not be 
done until we have Americanizerl theii* })laY, tlieir work and 
their surroundings. 

Franklin K. Lane has said 

**We want to interpret Am(n-ica in terms of fair play ; 
in terms of the square deal. We want in the (»nd to interpret 
America in healthier babies that have enough milk to drink. 
We want to interpret America in boys and girls and men 
and women that can read and write. We want to interpret 
America in better housing conditions and decent wages, in 
hours that will allow a father to know his own family. That 
is Americanization in the concrete — reduced to practical 
terms. That is the spirit of the Declaration of Indep(MHlence 
put into terms that are social and economic.'' 

Due to the Immigration Laws which have recently ^e- 
come operative, the nun)ber of foreign born people coming to 
Somerville is decreasing proportionately to the decrease in 
the quotas from the respective foreign countries. 

Consequently the number of so-called Beginnei*s in our 
schools is becoming so small that at the present time there is 
not a single class of real Beginners. It is necessary to place 
these people in what we term mixed classes. This situation, 
however, allows us to take another step nearer our ultimate 
goal. Our teachei-s. realizing this, are advancing on the 
broader task of Americanizing the play, work, and surround- 
ings of the new Americans. 

Table 15C of the School Report gives statistics for the 
school season 1923-24. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation of the loyal 
ty and co-operation of all my assistants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EvERBTT W. Ireland, 

Director. 



SrUiKil. DKrAltTMK.NT. 189 

REPORT OF THE ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

lleccmher IW, 1924 

Mr. Charles S. C^ark 
Suporintendent of Schools 

Somerville. Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

Various statistical tables have served lor many years 
to show wliat work has been done by the School Attendance 
Officer but figures cannot show the actual work accomplished. 
The public, in general, does not know what an officer is re- 
(|uired to do. 

All cliildren between the ages of seven and fourteen are 
compelled to attend school unless advantage is taken of the 
exceptions that are enumerated in the law. A child between 
the ages of fourteen and sixteen must be in school or at work. 
Illiterate minors between the ages of sixteen and twenty-one 
come under the Attendance Officer's jurisdiction and are fol- 
lowed up when specific cases come to his attention. Those 
most troublesome, in the main, are the truants and the absen- 
tees, and occasionally the school offenders. In addition, the 
Attendance Officer has the power to search for neglected chil- 
dren and see that they have proper care through the court. 
Finally he has the care of children engaged in the street 
trades, and may visit factories and stores in search of minors 
illegally empJoyed. 

The Attendance Department is obliged to keep a file re- 
lating to the registration of minors, or as it is called in some 
states, ^'The Child Accounting Bureau.'' 

Registration of Minors 

' "Child Accounting" 

This file would be of great value if the machinery worked 
smoothly. It requires a card for each child between the ages 
of five and sixteen and illiterates to the age of twenty-one. 
From the information sent in by the schools, we are enabled 
to have a cross file by streets as well. The person having 
charge of this work is hampered because census and transfer 
cards are not sent in promptly, thus causing a great deal of 
extra labor in locating children or forwarding cards of those 
who have left our City. As no penalty is provided for not 



190 ANN J' A I. KK POUTS. 

sending in cards from private schools, we have no pressui*e 
but moral suasion that we can use in this case. The church 
schools are very willing to co-operate but the small special! 
zing schools never seem to have heard of this law. 

Truants and Absentees 

The truant is dealt with by calling at the home, thus no- 
tifying the parent that the child is not at school, and also by 
talking with the child when possible. 

The absentee })resents a different problem. As a rule 
he is the child who, if he has left school for work, is either 
not stable, mentally retarded, the round peg in a square hole, 
or merely indifferent. The child of this sort, if still in the 
regular school, could be followed up much more closely if we 
had a suitable form for the teacher's use before the Attend- 
ance Officer was called into the case. The teacher might well 
visit the home, but in cases where she could not find time 
to do so the form might be mailed either to the home or to the 
father's business address. 

In some cities teachers who ai'e known as teacher visitors 
are employed to visit the homes. Tn my 0]>inion, a visit by the 
teacher would bring about this result. 

Tn one school in this City there is this motto : ''The Home 
With The School, The School With The Home. Team Work 
Will Win.'' What better way could be found than a visit by 
the teacher to bring about this team work. 

As a last resort, after an appeal has been made to the 
home, the boy, and any social agency that may have an in- 
terest in the case, court action is taken. If, aft(u- a period 
of probation, conditions do not improve, the child is taken to 
the County Training School where he has an entirely different 
environment, good food and regular hours of sleep. In many 
cases, as parents and the boys themselves have told me, the 
training the children receive here has been the making of 
them. 

Having summarized the duties of an Attendance Officer, 
I now take this opportunity to thank Mr. Clark and others 
who have assisted me during this past school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin R. JoneS;, 

Attendance Officer. 



SCilOOl. l)K!'Airr.\!KN"T. 191 



HISTORY OF THE SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL FROM 1852 
TO 1924 — ^By John A, Avery, Present Head Master 



In atteiuptiiig to writc^ even a brief . history of our 
scliool I am impressed with the magnitude of the task. Seven 
ty-two yearn ago its doors were first opened and sixty-three 
])upils were admitted ; today over two tliousand are making 
a like demand for more and higher learning; in tlie years 
between, thousands and tens of thousands have crossed its 
X)ortals. Each individual passing under its influence has car- 
ried out something for good to the community. Who can esti- 
niiito the sum total of knowledge, of better living, of higher 
ideals, of awakencnl ambitions which it has developed among 
the endless procession of its members and graduates? 

May 3, 1852, the first session was held in the Somerville 
Free High School (now the City Hall) with two teachers. 
Keading, writing, arithmetic, grammar, and geography were 
continued from the grammar school; history, mathematics, 
natural philosophy, drawing, Latin and French were added 
as strictly high school subjects. Compare such a curriculum 
with that of today with its fifty subjects of advanced grade, 
and one can realize the wonderful development of secondary 
education, at least from a standpoint of the richness of the 
course. 

TJie lirst ])riucipal was Robert Bickford. He served for 
two years and was followed in rapid succession by three men, 
Leonard Walker '54-56, Samuel J. Pike '56-58, and Isaac N. 
Beals "58-59. In 1859 Henry H. Babcock was elected, who 
served till 1867. In 1867 began the long term of George L. 
Baxter, who, as principal of the Somerville High School to 
1895 and of the Somerville Latin School from 1895 to 1911, 
rounded out a term of service, which for length, for wonder- 
ful achievement, and for vital imprint on the community, has 
few, if any, equals among educators of the country. In 1872 
the school, having out-grown its first building, moved into 
the second, known later as the Latin School (now the front 
section of the East building.) There were now six teachers 
and 181 pupils. To the course of study had been added phys- 
ics, chemistr;\', geology, astronomy, botany, physiology, civil 
government, and bookkeeping. 

The Somerville High School in these days had for its 
primary aim preparation for college. Comparatively few of 



192 ANxiAi. RKi'oirrs. 

the gi'ammar school graduates entered high school unless^ 

th(\y iiiteii«l(Hl to study vvvu fiirtlier. This condition contiiuied 
in a large way till 1895, although the English and Keguhir 
coui*ses became more and more popular. In 1870 for instance, 
119 pupils were in the Regular Coui^sc, 64 in the Classical 
Course, and 49 in the English Course. It must be noted, how- 
ever, that tliere was very little ditfercMice ht^ween the Kegnlar 
and the Classical Courses, — the chief being tlie substitution of 
a science for Greek. 

About 1888, the High School numbering 850 had already 
ovei'-reached the capacity of the building and the School Com- 
mittee began to discuss the need of another school. English 
High Schools were coming to the front in various parts of 
the country and a school of this type was recommended. This 
recommendation was made year after year and finally culmi- 
nated in 1895 in the dedication of the Somerville English 
High School (now the West building, front section.) The 
year before, 601 wei^ enrolled in the High School. In 1895, 
267 were enrolled in the Latin High School, 508 in the Eng- 
lish High School. 

No greater proof could be produced of the increasing 
popularity of High School education than is evidenced by 
the increasing enrollment. For instance, in 1867 5.5 out of 
every 100 in the Somerville public schools attended the High 
School: in 1805 10.17: in 1014 (nt the be2;inning of the war) 
18.18. 

Before referring to the English High School I want to 
pay my tribute to Mr. Baxter who for 44 years served the 
city so faithfully. A gentleman in the true sense of the word, 
a scholar, a conscientious servant to his calling, he worked 
assiduously to train x^i^pik*^ for college or for whatever walk 
in life they might be called to follow. Loved by his pupils, 
revered by his teachers, and respected by the community, he 
has established an enviable record of leadershi]^ and faithful 
service. 

In 1895 Mr. Baxter continued in the old school the 
college preparatory course under the name of the Somerville 
Latin School. Mr. Charles T. C. Whitcomb was elected head- 
master of the new English High School. The course of study 
for this school was based upon two important principles : — 
''the necessity of a broad training for all pupils, and the 
recognition of individual claims for development in the direc- 
tion of aptitudes and desires.'' The elective system was in- 
stituted and about half of each year's work was left to the 
choice of the pupils. Manual training, mechanical drawing, 
zoology, botany, commercial arithmetic, stenography, type- 
writing, commercial law. and solid geometry wm^ added to 



SCHOOL ni:!'Airj\'\uox'i\ 



loa 



the list of subjects offered. The preparation of boys for the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and of girls for the 
Normal Schools was transferred to this school. 

Mr. Whitcomb, a man of culture, oL' unusual executive 
ability, and of excellent training, soon placed the new school 
on a higli plane among schools of its type. The school grew in 
popularity ami in members and in a few years was seriously 
crowded. An addition to the Latin School in flJOb, part of 
which was used by the Englisli High School, partially relieved 
the congestion in both schools. Mr. Whitcomb resigned in 
11H)(>, and 1 was promoted from sub-master to take his place. 
In 1911 Mr. Baxter resigned and the two schools were united 
under my chai-ge undei- the old name of the Somerville High 
School. 

This reorganization was along the lines of the develop- 
ment of secondary education throughout the country and in- 
deed the various stages through which our sc1k)o1 has passed, 
i.e. the general high school with cultural subjects emphasized 
(1852-1895), specialized high schools (1895-1911) and now the 
comprehensive high school with specialized courses (1911-24) 
were all iu accord with the best educational thinking of the 
times. 

By this union of two schools it was felt that duplication 
and overlapping in preparatory work could be avoided, that 
small classes of like character in two schools could be com- 
bined, that the ease of clumge from one course to another 
could be facilitated, and that much duplication of organiza- 
tion ami aduiiuistrative detail could be prevented. 

The plan was successful. Teachers and pupils worked 
in haruiony and the various departments of the school made 
satisfactory progress. The school the following year, 1912, 
registered 2,02:) pupils, the building was very much over- 
crowded and could only accommodate (even then inadequate- 
ly) its pupils by a two-session plan. Partial relief was se- 
cured in 191:5 by the addition of 30 rooms to the AYest build- 
ing. An auditorium seating 1400 was also added, meeting aik 
outstanding need in the development of school unity and so- 
cial activities. 

The fourth and last stage in the history of the school! 
was started in 1915 by the establishment throughout the city 
of Junior High Schools. Hy this plan the High School was 
changed to a three year school and its name changed to the 
Somerville Senior High School. 

This plan worked well educationally and also served as a 
means of relief, at least temporarily, in caring for the num- 
ber of pupils attending the Senior High School. 



194 AXXl'AL REPORTS. 

That the relief was only temporary, however, is shown 
by the fact that the membei^hip for this year, 1924, is 2,100 
— several lumdred beyond the normal capacity of the bnild- 
ings. It is clear that some plan for a larger High School 
building must shortly be adopted if the school is to continue 
to function efficiently and to meet the needs of our growing 
city. 

In summing up this brief history of our honored school 
I want to mention several outstanding points of interest. 

(1) Its influence in the community through its mem- 
bership and graduates. 

In seventy-two years, 21,87G pupils have attended tlie 
school and 8,189 have graduated. Of these many have occu- 
pied prominent positions in the affairs of the nation, state, 
and city. A position in tlie President's cabinet, the lieuten- 
ant governorship of Massachusetts, national, state, and city 
legislative positions have all been filled by graduates of our 
school, as well as many prominent busiuess and professional 
positions. AVlierever one may turn may be found traces of the 
influence, the teachings, and the character building of our 
great institution. 

(2i Its wonderful record in preparation for college. 

Practically every higher school of learning in New Eng- 
land and many others throughout the country (and even 
abroad) have received our graduates. Preparation for col- 
lege in the old days was conspicuously successful and honors 
^came frequently to our boys and girls. These successes, how- 
-ever, did not cease with "the good old days" for even as late 
as 1922 our school received the Dartmouth College ])laque for 
sending there a group of boys receiving the highest scholastic 
grade, and at Kadclitfe College in the last five years three of 
our girls had the honor of outranking all other applicants for 
admission. Members of last year's class may be found en- 
rolled in 24 colleges and other higher institutions of learn- 
ing. 

(3) Its excellent record in preparation for business 
and other lines of endeavor. 

Business in all its various branches has had an open 
door for our commercial and general course pupils. Many of 
these boys and girls- hold or have held prominent positions 
and have brought great credit to the school. Our graduates 
are in constant demand and practically none who pass 
through these courses fail to secure excellent positions. 

(4 I Its unusual corps of teachers, many of long serv- 
ice in the city. 

To give a history of the 281 teachers who through their 
self-sacrifice, learning, and love for their work have left an 



SCriOOI. DEI'AltTMKNT. 195 

undying imprint on the lives of their pupils would be an al- 
most impossible task. I must mention a few, however, who 
have been conspicuous because of their long service. George 
L. Baxter for 44 years, Frank M. Hawes, Eudora Morey and 
Frances W. Kaan for 39 years each, Lena Gilbert for 29 years, 
A. Marion Merrill for 28 years, Charles T. Murray for 27 
years, and Sarah W. Fox and Clara A. Johnson for 26 years 
each, gave of their strength and power to the training of our 
youth. To them all honor is due. In addition to these, twelve 
others now in the school have given to the school over twenty 
years of service. The traditions and good name of the school 
owe much to the devotion and worthy labor of these faith- 
ful teachers. 

(5) Its continued progress in spite of hardships and 
overcrowding. 

In all these years, the demand for higher education has 
been in excess of the ability of the city to furnish accommo- 
dation. Crowded quarters and inadequate facilities with all 
the consequent discomforts and hardships have presented seri- 
ous obstacles. In spite of these obstacles the school has gone 
on reaching forward for higher ideals and loftier standards 
of attainment. 

In all these years of struggle, of hard work, of successes 
and failure, those of us who either as pupils or teachers have 
been permitted to work together within its walls should be 
justly proud of its achievements. May it continue to serve 
the community, to bring joy, serious purpose and inspiration 
to the lives of our youth, and to stand forth as a living monu- 
ment to its motto "Honor and Progress." 



196 



ANNUAL KErOKTS. 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 



Students Entering Higher Institutions in September 1924 



Acadia University 

Antioch College 

Boston College 

Boston University, C. B. A.... 
Boston University, C. L. A.... 
Boston University, P. A. L.. 

Bridgewater Normal 

Brown University 

University of Chicago 

Framingham Normal 

Georgetown University 

Harvard University 

Hyannis Normal 

Jackson College 

Lowell Textile School 

Laselle Seminary 

Mass. Institute Technology. 

Mount Allison College 

Mt. Holyoke College 



2 Mt. St. Mary's College 1 

1 Mass. Normal Art School 4 

3 Northeastern University 5 

10 College of Pharmacy 1 

9 Radcliffe College 7 

S Rollins College 1 

1 Salem Normal 12 

2 Sargent School Phy. Educa- 

1 tion 2 

3 Simmons College 4 

1 Tufts College 10 

10 Tufts, Pre-Dental 3 

2 Tufts, Pre-Medical 3 

« Wesleyan University 1 

^ Wheaton College 2 

Wheelock Kgn. Training 

■^ School 1 

^ University of Maine 1 

1 University of New Hamp- 

2 shire 2 

Total 134 

Entering College 100 

Entering Scientific schools.... 9 

Entering Normal schools .... 25 



Statement Showing Distribution of High School Pupils 



By Subjects, December, 1924 



English 














2097 


History 














1475 


Elocution . 














1066 


Greek 














23 


Latin .... 














515 


French 














924 


German .... 














41 


Spanish 














454 


Chemistry 














480 


Physics 














311 


Biology 














212 


Astronomy and Geology 














60 


Physiology 














28 


Trigonometry 














46 


Algebra 














341 


Geometry . 














444 


Mathematics, Review 














439 


Bookkeeping 














334 


Penmanship 














832 


Typewriting . 












641 


Stenography 














622 



SCHOOL DBtURTMENT. 



197 



Salesmanship 
Commercial Arithmetic 
Commerce and Industry 
Commercial Law 
Woodworking 
Cooking 
Sewing 

Home Economics 
Freehand Drawing . 
Mechanical Drawing- 
Physical Training 
Music 
Problems of Citizenship 



131 

74 
470! 

44 
139 
175 
201 
121 
988 
329 
2097 
2097 

33 



Membership of High School Activities 
December, 1924 



Girls' Debating Society . 










25 


Boys' Debating Society . 










36 


School Orchestra (2) 










80 


School Band and Drum Corps 










102 


Girls' Glee Club (2) 










155 


Boys' Glee Club 










52 


Mandolin Club .... 










22 


Girls' Athletic Association 










50 


High School Athletic Association 










330 


Players' Club .... 










60 


Chess Club 










15 


Students' Council 










18 


Spanish Club .... 










25 


English Club . . . . ' . 










60 



SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 
1924-1925 

President, Edith L. Lavcock 

^^. _ ., ^ ( William W. Obear 
\ icePiesidents, | (.^.^^^ jg ^^„g„ 

Secretary-Treasurer, Sadie M. Lyle 



Executive Committee 
Charles S. Clark, Ex-Officio 



Ine? Atwater, High 
Eleanor Campbell, Southern Jr. 
Mary C. Fox, Northea,stern Jr. 
Eleanor V. Nemser. Western Jr. 
Harry L. Jones, Boys' Vocational 
Kells S. Boland, Continuation 



Sarah E. Murphy, Perry 
Stella M. Hadley, Cumming^si 
M. Abbie Tarbett, Pope 
Louise S. We^.re, Prescott 
Harriet F. Ward, Glineai 
Lillisin G. Wells, Forster 



11)8 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Edith C. Polechio, Prescott M. Gertrude McCarthy, Bingham 

Martha L. Littlefield. Haiiscom Frances E. Welch. Carr 

Sarah L. Wolfe, Bennett Sarah K. Lake, Morse 

Maria D. McLeod, Baxter Mary Winslow. Durell 

Helen P. Gallagher, Knapp Ardelle Abbott, Burns 

Nettie L. Fay. Proctor May E. Small, Lowe 

Mary T. Ford, Brown Eugenia Carver, Cutler 

Carrie E. Crockett, Highland Lillian M. Wentworth, Lincoln 

Tbe iiicetings held under the auspices of this associa- 
tion in the year 1924 were as follows : 

February 6. 1924 — Roy W. Hatch, "Abraham Lincoln and Training in 

Citizenship." 

May 28, 1924 — Clayton L. Lent, Secretary of the Massachusetts Teach- 
ers' Retirement Board, "The Proposed Amend- 
ment to the Teachers' Retirement System." 

Noveni])er i;}. 1924 — Donald MacMillan, explorer, "The Arctic Regions." 



SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' CLUB 
Officers 1924-1925 

President, Mis<s Annie C. Woodward 

i Miss Dorothy E. Harvey 
A ice-Pre.sjdents, | ^^^,^ ^^^^.^ '^^ ^.^^^ 

Recording Secretary, Mrs. Myrtle I. Martin 
(Corresponding Secretary, Miss Emma J. Kennedy 
Treasurer, Miss E. Bella Weisman 
Auditor, Miss Elizabeth Campbell 



Object 

The object shall be to secure a close union among the 
women teachers in Somerville; to promote the spirit of mu- 
tual helpfulness; to advance professional interests; to create 
a deeper sense of the dignity of the proft^sion ; to unite the 
interests of the lionie and school. 



Program 

January J) — Schubert Singing Club. Sixty Voices. 
January 14 — "The Status of Women." Mrs. Jennie Loitman Barron. 
February 11 — Lecture, Mr. Angelo Patri. 

February 13 — "The World of Today," Mrs. Jennie Loitman Barron. 
March 10 — "Woman as a Civic Force." Mrs. Jennie Loitman Barron. 
March 11 — "Salvaging the Youth of the Nation," Miss Olive Jones, 

Pres. N. E. A. 



SCHOOL DKPARTMKNT. 



199 



March 12 — Dramatic Reading. "Mister Antonio." Mr. Leo Leonard. 

May 13 — Annual Meeting, Musical Recital and Readings. Myrtle Jor- 
dan, Flutist; Elizabeth Whiting, Reader; Hazel 
Clark Leonard, Violinist. 

October 8 — Reception. Social Evening. Entertainment. Travel Ex- 
periences. Mrs. Laura Littlefield, Soprano. 

November 6 — Current Events, Mrs. Grace Morrison Poole. 

November 12 — Entertainment, "The Bonnie Briar Bush." The Scot- 
tish Musical Comedy Company. 

December 17 — Yuletide Party. Refreshments and Social Hour. 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Annual Report of the Treasurer January 1, 1925 

Receipts 

Balance on hand January 1, 1924 

Baseball games . 

Football games . 

Minor sports 

Membership Pees 

Interest . . ' . 

Miscellaneous 





$2,176 S? 


$2,440 81 




4.396 08 




247 01 




82 50 




46 36 




33 10 






7,245 86 





Ex 


penditures 


Athletic supplies ..... 2,405 85 


Medical supplies 






85 94 


Paid to visiting teams 






1,541 18 


Officials .... 






398 00 


Police 






498 00 


Assistance at games . 






144 00 


Postage 






12 30 


Printing .... 






131 73 


Telephone .... 






44 97 


Transportation 






395 00 


Coaching .... 






1,275 00 


Physician's salary 






200 00 


Treasurer's salary 






400 00 


Dues to athletic association 






22 00 


Special expenses .... 






602 22 


Miscellaneous expenses 






150 96 



Balance on hand January 1, 1925 



9,422 7S 



8,307 15 



$1,115 6S 



George E. Pearson. 



Tf'easu7-er. 



1?00 A^NTAL rjCrOKTS. 



3n ilfiem0riam 

KATIE L. HARMON 

Cutler School 
D'ml Decmnber 7, 1924 



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SCHOOI, DKI'AKTMKNT. li()3 

CONTENTS OF APPENDIX 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

Population and school census. 

School buildings. ' 

Teachers. 

Attendance for year. 

Cost of school maintenance. 

Teachers' salaries. 

Result of eye and ear tests. 

MISCELLANEOUS TABLES 

CONCERNING FINANCE 
No. of Table. 

1. Schedule of school property. 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, school year 1923-1924. 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, school year 1923-1924. 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of years. 

6. Amount spent annually for now school buildings and for re- 

pairs for a series of years. 

CONCERNING PUPILS 

7. Population and school registration. 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for school year 1923-1924. 

9. Statistics of the high school for school year 1923-1924. 

10. Pupils by grades, June, 1924. 

11. Separate statistics for high, junior high, elementary and vo- 

cational schools, for school year 1923-1924. 

12. Admissions to first grade in September. 

13. Number of junior high school graduates, 1924. 

14. Truant statistics for a series of years. 

15. Evening school statistics, 1923-1924. 

16. Elementary school promotees for a series of years. 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years. 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years. 
-19. Promotions, junior high schools, 1924. 

19a Promotions, elementary schools, 1924. 

CONCER.NING TEACHERS 

20. Resignations of teachers. 1924. 

21. Teachers elected in 1924. 

22. Leave of absence of teachers. 

23. Transfers of teachers. 

24. Number of teachers employed for a series of years. 

STATISTICAL AND GENERAL TABLES 

25. Changes in textbooks, 1924. 

26. High and Junior High school graduation exercises, 1924. 

27. Vocational school graduation exercises, 1924. 

28. Organization of school board for 1925. 

29. Teachers in service January, 1925. 

30. OflBcers in service January. 1925. 

31. School janitors. 



204 



AXNI AI. liKl'Oins 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

1.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS 

Population, state census, 1895 ,.. 52,200 

Population, United States census, 1900 61,&43 

Population, state census, 1905 69,272 

Population, United States census, 1910 77,236 

Population, state census. 1915 86,854 

Population. United States census. 1920 93,033 

Children between five and fifteen years of age, April, 1924 

by school census , 17,189 



2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Number of school buildings in June 31 

Number of classrooms in use in June 403 

Valuation of school property $3,196,200 

3.— TEACHERS 



In high schools 

In junior high schools 

In elementary schools 

In kindergartens 

Total in elementary schools .. 
Vocational school for boys .. 
Independent Household Arts 

Atypical classe.s 

Sight Saving 

Cadet teachers 

Special 

.Continuation 

Americanization 

Total 



•1923 


•1924 


Change 


72 


73 


+ 1 


117 


116 


— 1 


212 


210 


—2 


14 


14 





226 


224 


—2 


8 


8 





1 


1 





•> 
•> 


4 


+1 


1 


1 





9 


14 


+5 


8 


10 


+2 


5 


4 


— 1 


2 


2 






452 



457 



+5 



4.— ATTENDANCE 

Entire enrollment for the year.... 

Average number belonging 

Average number attending 

Per cent, of daily attendance 

High school graduates 

Junior High school graduates 



FOR YEAR 






♦1923 


•1924 


Change 


15,932 


16,092 


-160 


14,308 


14.554 


^246 


13,276 


13.647 


+371 


92.8 


93.8 


+1.0 


419 


496 


+ 77 


914 


1.050 


+ 136 



5.— COST OF SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 



'1923 



Salaries of teachers $738,746 49 

Salaries of officers U^525 79 

Cost of books and supplies.... 44.106 14 

Cost of light and power 9.883 02 

Cost of janitors' services, etc. 63,408 44 

Cost of fuel and insurance.... 64,725 67 



•1924 


Change 


$755,016 61 


+ 16,270 12 


14.756 09 


+ 1.230 30 


52.757 14 


+8.651 00 


9,802 96 


—80 06 


67,276 47 


+3,868 03 


34.162 46 


—30.563 21 



SCIKKH, DKrAiri'MENT. 205 

Total cost of day and evening 

schools 934.395 55 933,771 73 —623 82 

Per capita cost 65 31 64 16 — 1 15 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 137,061 16 157,537 15 +20,465 99 

Per capita cost 72 87 81 35 +8 48 

6.— MISCELLANEOUS 

*m23 *1!>24 Change 

Paid for new school build- 
ings 588,301 51 289,938 66 —298,362 85 

Repairs and permanent 

improvements 63,052 43 57,593 06 —5,459 37 

Total school expenditures 1,585,749 49 1,281,303 45 —304,446 04 

Number of dollars spent 
to maintain schools out 
of every $1,000 of valua- 
tion 10 10 9 40 —0 70 

Valuation of city 92,519,400 00 99,311,000 00 +6,791,600 00 

Number of dollars spent 
for all school purposes 
out of everv $1,000 of 
valuation 17 12 12 90 —4 22 

*8chool year. 



Cost of the Schools 



The total amount spent tor the maintenance of the 
schools of Somerville for the school year ending June 30, 1924, 
k 1933,771.73. 

This includes the sums spent for care of school build- 
ings, including janitors^ services, fuel light, and school tele- 
phones ; the amount paid for salaries of officers, and the 
amount spent for school supplies ; and the sum paid for sal- 
aries of teachers. 

The expenditure for care for school huildings is wholly 
in charge of the City Government. 



The amount paid for janitors is 
The cost of fuel is 
The cost of light is . 

A total cost of 

The cost per capita 
Cost of repairs . 



$67,276 47 

34,162 46 

9,802 96 

111,241 89 

7 64 

57,593 06 



The second important expenditure is wholly under the 
control of the School Committee and is covered by what is 
known as the ^'School Contingent'^ appropriation. The fol- 
lowing is the itemized account: — 



20(; 



AXNl'AL KErORTS. 





Day Schools. 


EvKNiNG Schools. 

i 


continuation 
Schools and 


Elxpenditures. Total. 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Americaniza- 
tion work 


Officers' Sala- 
ries ; $14,756.01) 










Office Expenses i 3,421 .76 






i 




Textbooks 12,7:58.05 


$4,572.33 

13.983.40 
4,446.39 


$8,042.14 

9,144.12 
3.465.65 


: $103.87 


$14 71 


Stationery and 

Supplies andi 

Other Ex-; 

penses of In- i 

struction ; 28,80;}.41 

Miscellaneous i 

(Tuition, etc.)! 12.793.92 

1 


$475.57 34.92 
126.38 ; 57.16 


16.5.40 
4,698.:i4 


Total 1 $67,513.2;? 


$23,002.12 


$20,651.91 


$601.95 $195.95 


$4,883.45 



The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is tbe sum spent for the salaries of teachers. This 
expenditure is under the control of the School Committee. 

The following statement shows the distribution of the 
sums paid for salaries : — 



Day Sch()oi,s. 



KVKNIN<; St'HOOLs. 



Expenditures.! Total. , ^JSi^lNl^'"^"*^^^^ ^Siil!Kle«"entary 



Supervisors 

Principals 

Teachers 



$13,144.50 .$3,048.16 

48,858.00 12.342.00 

693.014.11 217,942.34 



$9,096.34 

32,607.00 

457,100.77 



$641.00 
6,733.50 



$468.00 
1,149.00 



Total I $755,016.61 .$233,332.50 i $498,804.11 : $7,374.50. $1,617.00 



Continuation 
Schools and 
Americaniza- 
tion WORK 



$1,000.00 

2,800.00 

10,088.50 



$13,888.50 



The total outlay for all school purposes includes all of 
the preceding and the sums spent for schoolhouse repairs and 
new buildings. 

The total outlay for the school year ending June 30, 1924 
is as follows : — 



Care 

Contingent 
Salaries ... 



Total for school maintenance 

Paid for repairs 

Paid for new buildings 



$111,241 89 

52,757 14 

769,772 70 

$933,771 73 

57,593 06 

289,938 66 



Total for all school purposes $1,281,303 45 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools 
has been divided in the following proportion : — 



SCIIOOl 


DKPAiri 


'.AIEiN'T. 






i:u/ 


1919 


1920 


192] 


1.922 


192;{ 


1924 


$0,097 


.1)0.074 


$0,070 


.$0,070 


$0,068 


$0,072 


0.057 


0.063 


0.085 


0.042 


0.080 


0.047 


0.017 


0.020 


0.015 


0.015 


0.015 


0.016 


0.067 


0.053 


0.030 


0.048 


0.047 


0.057 


0.762 


0.790 


0.800 


0.825 


0.790 


0.808 



Janitors' salaries .... 

Heat and light 

Administration 

School supplies 

Teachers' salaries.... 

$1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 
Per Capita Cost. The proper method of comparison of 
the cost of schools year by year is to consider the sum spent 
for each pupil in the average membership. In this computa 
tion we exclude the cost of evening schools, and the voca- 
tional schools. The following shows : — 



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208 



AXNIAL KEl'ORTS. 



Including the cost oi' maintenance of evening schools, the 
per capita cost is as follows : — 

1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

Cost of Instruction $31 82 $44 34 $50 07 $50 90 $50 39 $51 21 

Cost of Supplies 2 45 2 80 1 60 2 77 2 85 3 34 

Cost of Care 6 43 7 45 9 62 6 73 9 24 7 39 

Total $40 70 $54 59 $61 29 $60 40 $62 48 $61 94 

An examination of these tables shows that we have paid 
f 3.29 more for the instruction of each pupil in the High School 
than in 192o, and 14 cents more per pupil for supplies. 

The elementary schools have cost 19 cents less per pupil 
for instruction, and 45 cents more for supplies. 

The amount spent for the school year 1924 was $9.40^ 
or 70 cents less than was spent in 1923. The amotmt yielded 
for each child in the average membership of the schools for 
1924, not including the vocational schools, was |61.94. 



Teachers' Salaries 

The salaries paid to teachers in Januaiy, 1925, are as 
follows : — 



man $4,100 



man 

men 

men 

men, 

man ... 

man ... 

man .. 

men .. 

men .. 

men .. 

woman 

man 

men 

woman 

men 

men .. 

men 

man, 3 

man 



1 woman. 



women. 



4,100 


6 


3.500 


1 


3,100 


6 


3,050 


1 


3,000 


22 


2,950 


2 


2,800 


1 


2,775 


10 


2,700 


26 


2.550 


1 


2.500 


~) 


2,400 


*1 


2,300 


152 


2.275 


1 


2,150 


25 


2,100 


9 


2.075 


1 


2.000 


15 


1.975 


8 


1,950 


13 



women. 



men, 5 women $1,900 

man 1,850 

women 

man, 5 women 

women 

women 

man. 14 

women 

women 

man, 62 

women 

man. 3 

women 

woman 

women 

women 

woman 

women 

women 

women 



women. 



women. 



1,825 
1,800 
1,750 
1,72& 
1,700 
1.675 
1,650 
1,600 
1,575 
1.550 
1,500 
1.450 
1.40O 
1,300 
1,250 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 



•Part time. 



SCHOOL DKf'ARTMBNT. 209 
SIGHT AND HEARING 

The following give the results of the eye and ear tests : — 

1924 1923 Change 

Number of pupils enrolled 14,504 14,272 +232 

Number found defective in eyesight .... 1,719 1,577 +142^ 

Number found defective in hearing 183 148 -f-35 

Number of parents notified 1,367 1,233 +134 



210 



ANNIAL RKrORTS. 





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ANNUAL RKI^ORTS. 



TabJe 2. — Cost of Maintaining Schools. 



FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1923-24. 



Fkom S(^,hooj. Appropriation. 



SCHOOlvR. 



High 

Northeastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Western Jr 

Preacott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

For8ter 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight having 

Boys' Vocational 

I n(ie[>endent House- 
hold Arts 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 

$147,548.15 
81,809.76 
59,179.44 
63,124.14 
16,863,48 
19,026.61 
21,165.22 

9,711.96 
15,816.61 
11,321.82 
20,065.30 

7,056.18 
16,449.50 
25,101.96 

8,473.73 
28,869.32 
26,958.94 
20,069.39 
13,966.32 

6,968.04 
14,138.22 
16,286.05 
12,349.18 
34,751.78 

6,970.31 
14,102.76 

6,420.31 

1.573.01 
18,070.82 

2,339.00 
9,080.59 
6,567.21 
7,577.59 



Supplies. 

$13,865.88 

5,044.73 

4,885.69 

4,2::51.55 

628.47 

858.45 

1,312.42 

372.02 

868.61 

550.51 

1,076.65 

292.91 

1,281.03 

1,276.56 

496.95 

1,321.55 

1,411.28 

805.53 

723.85 

343.39 

500.70 

843.20 

582.62 

1,819.14 

365.63 

642.08 

376.88 

167.27 

4,419.22 

55.61 
876.90 
:«7.76 
122.10 



Spent BY City 
Govern MKNT. 

Care. 

$18,304.06 
7,858.32 
6,904.84 
7,650.74 
4,332.33 
2,619.31 
2,752.59 
2,044.71 
2,819.57 
2,044.71 
2,919.50 
1,826.53 
2,919.50 
3,141.80 
4,497.3:^ 
3,588.03 ; 
3,564.92 
2,945.50 
2,456.11 
1,718.53 i 
2,345.01 
2,619.31 
2,114.34 
5,238.6;> , 
1,804.51 
2.325.01 
920.78 
224.37 
2,096.22 

1,115.30 
1,461.03 ' 
1,118.46 ; 
950.00 



Total 



$179,718.09 
94,712.81 
70,969.97 
75,006.43 
21,824.28 
22,504.37 
25,230.23 
12,128.69 
19,504.79 
13,917.04 
24,061.45 

9,175.62 
20,650.03 
29,520.32 
13,468.01 
.33,778.90 
31,935.14 
•i3,820.42 
17,146.28 

9,029.96 
16,983.93 
19,748.56 
15,046.14 
41,809.54 

9,140.45 
17,069.85 

7,717.97 

1,964.65 
24,586.26 

3,509.91 

11,418.52 

8,023.43 

8,649.69 



ToUl $769,772.70 | $52,757.14 | $111,241.89 $933,771.73 



S ( ■ F1 ( )( ) I , D K 1 ' A RT M K NT. . 



213 



Table 3. — Per Capita Cost of Maintaining Schools. 



FOR SCHOOL YEAR 192:^24. 



SrHlMJKS. 



High 

Northeastern Jr \ 

Southern Jr 

Western Jr i 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

. Bmgham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Evening 

Continuation 

Americanization 

Elementary 

All schools (without 
state-aided schools) 



Boys' Vocational 

Ind. Household Arts. 



Instruction 








and 


Supplies. 


Care. 


Total . 


Supervision. 








$76.21 


$7. 16 


$9.45 


$92.82 


m.io 


3.71 


5.77 


69.63 


58.01 


4.78 


6.77 


69.56 


5H.n 


3.76 


6.80 


66.67 


51.41 


1.91 


13.21 


66.53 


40.14 


1.81 


5.53 


47.48 


44.94 


2.79 


5.84 


53.57 


54.26 


2.08 


11.42 


67.76 


38.58 


2.12 


6.88 


47.58 


45.65 


2.22 


8.24 


56.11 


38.07 


2.05 


5.54 


45.66 


40.32 


1.67 


10.44 


52.43 


28.91 


2.25 


5.13 


36.29 


38.92 


1.98 


4.87 


45.77 


37.33 


2.19 


19.81 


59.33 


43.15 


1.98 


5.36 


50.49 


40.06 


2.10 


5.30 


47.46 


44.01 


1.77 


6.46 


52.24 


43.24 


2.24 


7.60 


53.08 


41.98 


2.07 


10.35 


54.40 


46.05 


1.63 


7.64 


55.32 


44.38 


2.30 


7.14 


53.82 


46.60 


2.20 


7.98 


56.78 


40.98 


2.15 


6.18 


49.31 


46.16 


2.42 


11.95 


60.53 


42.87 


1.95 


7.07 


51.89 


110.70 


6.50 


15.88 


133.08 


121.00 


12.87 


17.26 


151.13 


10.86 


1.05 


1.75 


13. m> 


40.29 


2.07 


6.86 


49.22 


20.32 


.33 


2.55 


23.20 


42.18 


2..I3 


7.18 


51.49 


51.21 


3.34 


7.39 


61.94 


250.98 


61.38 


27.73 


340.09 


47.85 


.45 


9.00 


57.:^ 



:i4 



ANNUAL RBr»ORTS. 



Table 4. — Annual Cost of Maintaining the Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amount* are given t<» the nearest dollar and include what ha^? been paid 
lor maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 
Member- 
ship. 


Fko.m School Aphko- 

PRIATION. 


Sum S 


PENT UNDKK Dli;KCriO>- OF 

City GovernmkiNT. 




Ykar. 


Instruction c, v.^^i 


Light. 


Heating. Janitors. 

i 


School 

Tele- 

phouen. 


Total. 


1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 


11,710 
11,856 
12,320 
12,903 
13,191 
12,770 
12,656 
12,733 
12,836 
13,3L6 
14,109 
14,308 
14,544 


$306,709 
320,744 
338,587 
;:i57,581 
363,948 
376,138 
410,589 
437,730 
613,294 
714,859 
747,905 
752,272 
769,773 


$:30,319 

25,877 

126,843 

29,389 

26,098 


$5,995 
5,842 
6,448 
5,755 
<i.233 


$15,676 !$30,219 
16,055 ' 32,939 
18,952 33,711 
18,366 32,674 
20,197 34.667 


1512 
542 
624 
213 


$389,431 
402,092t 
425,166 
443,978 
451,143 


1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 


29,221 ' 5,429 
33,587 i 6,966 
33,225 : 8,821 
40,079 '10,092 
26,329 ; 12, 163 
42,682 110,531 
44,106 j 9.883 
52,757 1 9.803 


25,487 
:i'),839 
22,9ii0 
37,083 
63,017 
26,521 
64,726 
34,162 


35,718 
42,063 , 
55,710 
56,381 j 
61,435 \ 
61,987 i 
63,408 
67,277 


is'; 

! 


471,993 

529,062 

*559,328 

*757,679 

*878,153 
*889,877 


1923 




934,396 


1924 


1 


933,772 






' 









t $92.50 included for rental of church for schoolhon.<;e purposes in Ward 

* Include.^ $882.50, rent of Armory, in 1919. 

• " 750.00. ■' . in 1920. 

* " H50.00. ■■ .in 1921. 

• •■ J50.00. " . in 1922. 



Table 5. — Annual Cost Per Capita of Maintaining Schools. 



FOH A SERIES OF YEARS. 

[Based on the average membership.] 















Ratio of 




Instruction 


School 


Janitors. 




-Assessors" 


Cost of 


Yeah. 


and 


Supply 


Heat and 


Total. 


Valuation 


School Main- 




Supervision. 


Expenses. 


Light. 




of City. 


tenance to 
Valuation. 


1912 


$23 6J 


$2 12 


$3 99 


$29 72 


$69,632,540 


$ .005.56 


1913 


24 54 


1 91 


4 18 


30 63 


71,848,811 


.00559 


1914 


24 55 


1 89 


4 27 


30 71 


74,887,800 


.00568 


1915 


24 fK) 


2 03 


3 92 


30 85 


77, 153,, 500 


.00575 


1916 


26 25 


1 88 


4 41 


32 54 


79,304,329 


.00569 


1917 


26 72 


2 05 


4 61 


33 .38 


78,921,472 


.005^5 


1918 


29 58 


2 40 


6 09 


38 07 


84,()39,280 


.00626 


1919 


31 82 


2 45 


() 43 


40 70 


87,353,424 


.tX)(>43 


1920 


44 34 


2 80 


7 45 


54 59 


83,910,855 


.00903 


1921 


.50 07 


1 60 


9 62 


61 29 


86,718,290 


.01012 


1922 


50 90 


2 77 


6 73 


60 40 


88,158,139 


.01009 


1923 


50 39 


2 85 


9 24 


62 48 


92,519,400 


.01010 


1924 


51 21 


3 34 


7 39 


61 94 


99,311,000 


.00940 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



21 



O 



Table 6. — Amount Spent Annually for all School Purpose*. 

FOB A SERIES OF TEABS. 







F'or New 


For Repairs and ; j^(>r Maintaininir 


Amount Spent 


Year. 


School houses . 


Permanent 




Sfihools. 




for all 




$35,527 


Improvement 


$389,431 




School Purposes 


1912 


$14,163 


$439,121 


1913 


34,866 


19,341 




402,092 




456,299 


1914 


120,913 


19,700 




425,165 




565,778 


1915 


9,745 


28,212 




443,978 




481,935 


1916 


81,184 


21,634 




451,143 




553,961 


1917 


94,420 


27,283 




471,993 




593,69<^ 


19 IS 


100,177 


30,126 




529,062 




(k59,36r> 


1919 


104,067 


20,492 




559,328 




683,887 


192(» 


200 


44,286 




757,679 




802,165 


1921 


3,285 


39,573 




878,153 




921,011 


1922 


7,576 


36,629 




889,877 




934,082 


1923 


588,302 


63,052 




934,395 




1 ,585,749 


1924 


289,938 


57,593 




933,772 




1,281,303 


For years pri 


r>r to 191'2 see Sehc 


)ol Ftcport of 19 


7. 




TA 


BLE 7.— POF 


>ULATION 


AND SCHOOL 


CENSUS 




For 


School Year 1923-1924 






1842 . . 


1.013 


1901 . . 


63,000 




1913 . . 81,00© 


1850 . 




3,540 


1902 . . 


65,273 




1914 . . 85,000 


1860 . 




8,026 


1903 . . 


67,500 




1915 . . 86,854 


1865 




9,366 


1905 . . 


69,272 




1916 . . 88,000 


1870 




14,693 


1906 . . 


70,875 




1917 . . 90,000 


1875 




21,594 


1907 . . 


72,000 




1918 . . 91,000 


1880 




24,985 


1908 . . 


75,500 




1919 . . 91,500 


1885 




29,992 


1909 . . 


75,500 




1920 . . 93,033 


1890 




40,117 


1910 . . 


77,236 




1921 . . 94,500 


1895 




52,200 


1911 . . 


78,000 




1922 . . 98,000 


1900 




61,643 


1912 . . 


80,000 




1923 . . 99,000 

1924 . . 100,440 



School Census 
Number of children between 5 and 15 vears of age. inclusive, 
April 1, 1924 . ' 

School Registration 

Number of children between 5 and 15 vears of a^e, inclusive. 
April 1. 1924: — 
In public scliools ........ 

In private schools ........ 

Total 

Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 13 inclusive: — 

In public schools, males ..... 4.512 

females . . . 4,660 



In private schools, males . 
females 



1.193 
1,245 



17,189 



12,964 
3,295 

16.259 



9,172 
2,43S 



Total 



11,610 



216 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 8. — Attendance of the Public Schools for the School Year 

1923-1924 



an on . 

5 c • 
«2 

o ^ 

72; 
35 1 
32! 
38 i 
24^ 
10 i 
11; 

5 
10] 

5; 
12| 

4. 

4 

14; 

IHJ 
In 

111 

HI 

*i 
,ol 

l! 

■ s; 

41 
11 



High 

Northeastern Jr. High 

Southern Jr. High 

Western Jr. High 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

C'nmmings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durel] 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

(•utler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Sight Saving 

Boys* Vocational 

Cnntinnation 



■3* 
3 o 



2,104 
1,461 
1,097 
1,194 
372 
534 
516 
213 
492 
269 
587 
206 
631 
too 
238 
743 
721 
504 
355 
188 
329 
401 
283 
905 
166 
348 
53 
13 
102 
334 



a> 



1,936 

1,360 

1,020 

1,125 

328 

474 

471 

179 

410 

248 

527 

175 

569 

645 

227 

669 

673 

456 

323 

166 

.307 

367 

265 

848 

151 

329 

58 

13 

72 

163 



fc.'O 



1,811 
1,299 
951 
1,081 
301 
435 
442 
166 
386 
231 
493 
163 
528 
606 
211 
626 
634 
429 
302 
155 
286 
346 
253 
796 
142 
307 
52 
12 
ti9 
134 



o t 
u c 

2-< 



93.5 
95.5 
93.2 
95.1 
92.0 
89.9 
92.2 
92.5 
94.2 
93.1 
93.6 
93.1 
92.8 
91.9 
93.0 
88.5 
94.2 
91.3 
93.5 
93.0 
93.2 
94.1 
95.6 
91.5 
93.8 
93.3 
89.0 
91.2 
96.5 
82.6 



6c 

6.5 



2,048 
1,394 
1,059 
1,140 
324 
498 
480' 
180' 
403 
240 
541 
188, 
569' 
664! 
202 
681 
668 
460 
323 
168 
312 
.375 
265 
840 
1541 
330 i 
551 
13' 
80 
143 



a 
6 



1,843 
1,305 
977 
1,098 
376 
432 
467 
174 
418 
254 
510 
171 
549 
612 
280 
675 
670 
453 
331 
161 
301 
353 
260 
841 
152 
326 
58 
13 
65 
140 



4031 



Total 16,092 14,554 



:iS7 Total for 1922-23 1 5, 932 1 4,308 



13,647 93.8 '14,797 



13,276 i 92.8 i 14,596 



14,265 



13,899 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



217 



Table 9. — Statistics of High School for School Year 
September 10, 1&23 to June 26, 1^24 



Number of teachers, including Head Master 

Number of days school kept 

Number enrolled . 

Average number belonging 

Average daily attendance 

Tardinesses 

Dismissals 

In Class 1926. September 

June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class 1925, September 

June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class 1924. September . 

June . 

Per cent, of loss 
Special Students, September 

June 

Per cent, of loss 
Total, September 

June 

Per cent of loss . 
Number of graduates, male 
Number of graduates, female 

Total 

Average age, male graduates 

Average age, -female graduates . 

Number entering college 

Number of graduates entering scientific schools 

Number of graduates entering normal schools 

Cost of instruction 

Cost of supplies 

Total cost 
Per capita cost of instruction 
Per capita cost of supplies . 
Total cost per capita . 



18 yrs., 
17 yrs., 



72 

180 

2,104 

1,936.3 

1,811.2 

4,872 

602 

869 

756 

13 

639 

576 

9.9 
524 
503 
4 
16 
13 
18.8 
2,048 
1,848 
9.8 
264 
213 
497 
3 mos. 
8 mos. 
78 
27 
37 
$145,389 67 
12,147 48 
157,537 15 
75 08 
6 27 
81 35 



218 



ANNUAL KKT'ORTS. 



Table 10. — Pupils by Grades, June, 1924. 



SCHOOI,. 



HiRh 



Junior Hiirh 



Elementary 



Kinderjrarten 



<iRAl>K. 

Special 


Tkachers. 
Men. 1 Women. 

• i 

j V. 

i u ' C 

1 .5 5 
? .S2 

1 


■J. 

X. 


PUPIIX. 

H 

-K 


Total. 








4 

218 
253 
:J32 


4 
285 
323 
424 


H 

503 
576 
756 


Twelfth 








Eleventh 








Tenth 








Total 








17 


56 




807 


1,036 


1.843 


Ninth 

Eighth 










CO 05-9" 

COOO M 


534 
560 
630 


1,067 
1.049 
1,264 


Seventh 









Total 








16 


100 




1,656 


: 1.724 

j 


3,380 


Sixth 

Fifth 

Fourth 

Third 

Second 





31 
31 
34 
33 
35 
34 




603 
646 
668 
711 
755 
806 


626 
675 
763 
712 
694 
764 


1.229 
1.321 
1.431 
1.423 
1.449 
1.570 







1 


First .. 




3 


Total 

Special 




8 


198 


4 


4.189 


4.234 


8.423 


o 


1 

14 

4 


/ 


176 


1 , 
167 


343 


Sight Saving 




7 


6 


13 


Cadets 






Atypical 

Boys' Vocational... 
Independent 

Household Arts 
Continuation 


'""s"" 




36 

f.5 


•22 


58 
65 


.. .. 


1 
1 
2 






3 




102 


:5H- 


140 


Americani/ation ... 




; 

I 


• 


(irand Total 


55 


391 


11 


7.038 


7.227 


14.265 








1 .-^97 



SCHOOL DBJI»ARTMBNT. 



219 



Table 11. — Pupils in High, Junior High. Elementary, Vocational, and 
Continuation Schools, 1923-1924 






Annual enrollment 2104 , 3752 

Average membership '. 1936 , 3505 

Averagre attendance : 1811 ; 3331 

Per cent, of attendance ; 93.5 ' 95.0 

Number ca.ses of tardiness 4872 , 2808 

Number cases of dismissal 602 '• 1112 

Membership, October. 1923 2048 ; 3593 

Membership. June, 1924 1843 3380 

No. cases Corp. punishment 2 3 






9351 
8470 
7937 
93.7 
4506 
1822 
8513 
8423 
23 











p 




^-" 






o 












ider 
tens 


tion 
hool 
Boy 


93 K 

11 


si 

fee > 


3 O 


.^ ►- 


« o e^ 


>.^ 


■^ ee 


.S o ' 


-^ u 




<r7. 


' m 




3.S3 


102 


53 


13 


.334 ' 


;>37 


72 


58 


13 


163 i 


301 


69 


52 


12 


134 


89.3 


96.5 


89.0 


91.2 


82.6 


11 


122 


46 


19 


144 




.35 


1 


2 


12 


352 


80 


55 


13 


143 


343 


65 


58 


13 


140 



13.647 

93.8 

12,.528 

3,586 

14,797 

14.265 

28 



Table 12. — Number of Pupils Admitted to Grade 1 in September 



X"H(K)[.. 



i92() 



]*rescc»tt (.j(5 

Hanecom I2(} 

Bennett i^^j 

Bax ter 34 

Knapp 47 

Perry 40 

Pope 71 

Cummingp 47 

Edgerly... 54 

Glines j jq 

Forster 31 

Bingham yf^ 

Carr gj 

Morse 7j^ 

Proctor 3^ 

Durell 30 

Burns 77 

Brown 72 

Cutler ..: I jjj 

Lincoln 09 

Lx>we I '79 

I 

I 

Total I 1,411 



1U21 



78 
78 

117 
2« 
74 
37 
71* 
48 
53 
79 
25 
91 
74 
«9 
42 
.37 
58 
72 

168 
32 
79 



1922 



1,4]() 



1,414 



923 



87 


82 


114 


83 


74 


89 


35 


35 


45 


40 


48 


32 


89 


m 


50 


41 


43 


40 


94 


104 


32 


33 


106 


95 


i% 


113 


74 


72 


44 


i 3() 


3>7 


4H 


83 


7« 


«8 


«a 


120 


129 


44 


33 


(il 


1 69 

i 

1 

1 , , . 



1,397 



220 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 13. — Eighth Grade Promotions — Junior High Schools 

1924 



June, 



Promotion from the eighth grade to the ninth grade in 



the Junior High School corresponds to the promotion 
the last grade of a grammar school to the High School. 



from 









Oi 


^ 








M 










o 
2 


^ 




<Q 


»2 






o 


A 


.c 


^ 




c. 


A^ 






5 


u 




o 


■r 


o 


tS o 




45 


-o 


'^ 


'K 


:? 


a; 


>-r' 


o<» 


School 


mber in Cl 
in June 


Promote 
adey 


Entering 


Entering 
tside City 


o 

c 

1 


O 


Entering 
nal Schoo 


Entering 
nior High 
City 




3 


oJi 


o 


|o 





o 


o.y 


055 




'/■^ 


•A^ 


y^ 


'A 


^^ 


-^^ 


^^^ 


Northeastern Jr. High 8chool 


418 


387 


362 


7 


14 


3 


1 





Southern Junior High School.. 


292 


286 


251 


8 


13 


12 





2 


Western Junior High School .. 


370 


362 


330 


24 


1 


4 


2 


I 


Total 


10»0 1035 


943 


39 


28 


19 


3 


3 



Table 13A. — Ninth Grade Promotions — Junior High Schools 

1924 



June, 



Promotion from the ninth grade to the tenth is the pro 
motion from the Junior High School to the Senior High 
School. The tenth grade corresponds to the second year of 
a four year High School. 











.a 










s 








r» 


PU 







(i> 






School 






Enter i 
mervill 
hool 


Enteri 
her Sch 
or Pri\ 




3 fl 


55 "^ 





05.^ 


Northeastern Junior High 


396 


383 


354 


5 


Southern " 


346 
339 


*:^4 

330 


275 

280 


10 


Western " 


24 






Total 


1081 


1047 


909 


39 



• Includes two pupils who died. 









M 




«i 


kl 




>.o 




•3 


OA 





0- 

<& 




5Q a 
3 ^ 


be 


^ 


(^ d 


J3 




« 
















■z> 


V, 








o> 


J-^ 


y. 


y<^ 


7 , 


15 


2 


32 


15 





16 


7 


3 


55 


37 


5 



SCHOOL DKI'ARTMENT. 



221 



Table 14. — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance Department for 

the School Year 1923-1924 



Number of visits to the schools 

Number of visits to the homes 

Number of cases investigated . 

Number of cases found to be truan- 
cy or absenteeism .... 

Number of different pupils who 
were truants or habitual absen- 
tees 

Number who were truants for the 
first time 

Number who were truants for the 
second time ..... 

Number Avho were truants for 
three or more times 

Number of girls who were truants 
or absentees ..... 

Number of visits to mercantile or 
manufacturing establishments 

Number of minors found to be 
working without employment 
certificates ..... 

Number of employment certificate* 
issued to boys .... 

Number of employment certificates 
reissued to boys .... 

Number of employment certificates 
issued to girls .... 

Number of employment certificates 
reissued to girls .... 

Number of educational literate cer- 
tificates issued to minors over 16 
years of age (first issue) 

Number of newspaper licenses is- 
sued to boys 12 to 16 years of age 
Number of transfer cards investi- 
gated 

Number of transfer cards forwarded 

Number of truants in the County 

Training school at the close of 

the year 

Amount paid for board of truants 



1923 


1924 


Change 


377 


429 


+52 


1,101 


989 


—112 


1,172 


1,083 


—89 



322 



296 



-26 



249 


237 


—12 


201 


187 


—14 


37 


35 


—2 


11 


7 


—4 


6« 


55 


—13 


33 


32 


— 1 


70 


24 


—46 


322 


256 


—66 


252 


128 


—124 


179 


107 


—72 


90 


37 


—53 


2,363 


1,852 


—511 


45 


45 





1,489 


2,200 
1,403 


-f711 


11 

11,006.56 


6 
$910.02 


—6 

—$96.54 



»>»>)•) 



ANNUAL REI'ORTS. 



Table 14. — (Concluded) — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance 
Department for the. School Year 1923-1924 



Disposition of truancy and habitual absentee cases: 

Warned and returned to school . 
Transferred to other schools 
Obtained certificates (14 to 16 years) 
Left school (over 16 years) . 
Removed from city .... 

Brought before court and returned to school 
Brought before court and sent to Training School 
Returned to Training School (violating parole) 
Sent to Lyman School ..... 

Sent to Shirley ...... 

Sent to Home of the Angel Guardian , 

Given in charge State Board of Public Welfare 



137 

10 

26 

5 

44 

4 

4 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 



Table 14-a. — Truancies and Habitual Absenteeism by Ages and Grades. 











BY A(4ES. 












6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


! 
I 11 ! 12 

{ { 


13 


! 14 

1 


15 


: 16 or 

1 Over 

i 


Total 


I 1 


4 
4 


4 


1 

1 

2 


1 












f5 


II 


i 




11 


Ill 


1 


5 


fi 


5 


2 


2 











21 


IV 




1 


7 
1 


4 

• 5 
1 


! 2 3 

; 12 i 6 

1 6 




3 

8 


3 

1 

13 


2 
1 





20 


V 




30 


VI 






29 


VII 










1 (y 


15 


18 


8 


2 


50 


VIII 










i 


5 


14 


3 




22 


IX 










_ 


1 


4 


10 




15 


X 

















5 


2 ; 


7 


XI 
























XII 
























Ungraded 

Special 

Boys; Voc'l 

Contin't'n 

' i 


5 


2 









1 

I 






' 










8 





1 




2 


5 


i" 

7 


i 

1 


4 
2 

12 


Total 1 


14 


12 


17 


18 


17 


1 
24 i 


34 


59 


37 


4 


237 



SCHOi)!. nKPAIlTMK>rT. 



22:5 



Table 15. — Evening High School — Season 1923-1924 



Enrolled 

Average membership 
Average attendance 

Number of teachers 
Number of sessions . 
Cost of Instruction .... 

Cost of janitor, fuel, light, 
and supplies . . . . 



Total cost .... 17,058 15 

Cost per pupil per evening . 23 

Average attendance: October, 510; November, 401; December. .335; 
January, 285; February, 238; March, ,244. 



Mate Female 


Total 


516 409 


925 


287 229 


516 


188 157 


345 


21 




59 




$5,502 50 




1,555 65 





Table 15.-A. — Evening Elennentary Schools — Season 1923-1924 



Enrolled ....... 

Average membership . . . . 

Average Attendance 

Number of teachers . . . . 

Number of sessions 

Cost of instruction . 
Cost of janitor, fuel, light, 
and supplies . . . . 

Total Cost 

Cost per pupil per evening 



Male Female 


Total 


131 


71 


202 


84 


50 


134 


50 


33 


83 


6 






79 






$1,617 


00 




591 


88 




$2,208 


88 







21 





Table 15-B. — Evening Vocational Classes — Season 1923-1924 



Enrolled 

Average Membership 
Average Attendance 
Number of teachers 
Number of sessions 

Cost of instruction 

Cost of janitors, fuel, light and supplies 

Total expenditure .... 
Income from sources other than local taxation . 

Net expenditure . . . 
Reimbursement from State 

Net cost ...... 

Net cost per pupil per evening , 



Women 

215 

185 

159 

12 

39 

$1,997 13 

318 45 

$2,315 58 
334 15 

$1,981 43 
$990 72 

$990 71 
$0 137 



224 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 15-C. — Americanization Classes — Season 1923-1924 



Enrolled . . 
Average membership 
Average attendance 
Number of classes 
Number of teachers 
Number of sessions 
Membership hours 
Cost of Instruction 
Cost of supplies 

Total cost . 
Reimbursement 
State 



from 



the 



Net cost 

Net cost per membership hour 



Male 


Female 


Total 


291 


263 


554 


189 


184 


373 


144 


146 
25 
15 
75 
51,885 
$7,683 50 
39 55 


290 




$7,723 05 






3,861 53 






$3,861 52 






$0 074 





SCHOOL DErARTMENT. 225 

Table 16. — Promotions from Elementary to Junior High Schools 

1920 i 1921 i 1922 j 1923 1924 



Knapp. 



Ferry 



Pope. 



Edgerly. 



10/ 



83 I 91 132 161 



32 



39 



127 136 129 



171 ! 171 I 168 



136 ! 88 



157 189 



(ilines. 



83 



94 ' 91 ! 90 95 



Forster. 



31 



29 i 35 29 40 



Bingham. 


1 

66 


95 


j j 

87 j 

1 
1 


78 


87 


Carr. 


96 


113 

i 


142 

i 


118 


138 


Morse. 


61 


43 


I 

1 68 


58 


68 


Proctor. 


1 
59 


44 


53 1 


64 

1 


59 


Brown. 


70 


43 


!■ 69 

! 


73 

1 


44 


Highland. 


178 


155 


1 161 1 

i 1 


156 


129 


Cutler. 


120 


115 


! 1 
! 154 

1 


147 

1 


146 


Total. 


1201 


1160 


1248 


1238 


1244 


Average 
Membership 
of Elementary 
Schools 


8334 


8270 


8268 


8347 

1 


8878 
14.02 


Per cent of 
Average 
Membership 
Promot<='d 


14.41 


14.03 


15.09 


14,83 



226 



ANNUAL RKI'ORTS. 



Table 17. — Attendance Statittfee. 

KOR A SEKIEH OF YKAKS. 















Ratio of 




1.- 


Averas*" 


Averagt^ 


Per cent, of 


Number of 


Tardiness 


Junk 


EM'vOI.I.MK.NT 


Membership 


AttendaTi(« 


Attendance 


Tardi- 
nesses 


to Aver age 
Attendance 


1912 


13,272 


11,710 


11,083 


94.6 


6,307 


0.569 


1913 


13,491 


11,903 


11,216 


94.2 


7,354 


0.655 


1914 


13,932 


12,320 


11,610 


94.2 


7,380 


0.635 


1915 


14,505 


12,903 


12,189 


94.5 


8, OCX) 


0.656 


1916 


14,647 


13,191 


12,323 


93.4 


9,373 


0.761 


1917 


13,967 


12,770 


11,933 


93.7 


7,325 


0.613 


1P18 


14,256 


12,656 


11,798 


93.2 


8,970 


0.760 


1919 


14,039 


12,733 


11,609 


91.2 


9,744 


0.839 


1920 


14,091 


12,836 


11,807 


91.9 


11,628 


0.993 


1921 


14,500 


13,39(> 


12,533 


93.6 


1 1,337 


0.904 


1922 


15,225 


14,004 


13,160 


94.0 


11,620 


0.883 


1923 


15,932 


14,308 


13,276 


92.8 


13,164 


0.991 


1924 


16,092 


14,554 


13,647 , 


93.8 


12,528 


0.J^18 



Table 18. — Membership, Etc., of High School. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Yrau. 


Average 
Membership 
all Schools. 


Largest 
Number in 
High School. 


Per cent, of 
Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


Number of 
(Graduates of 
High School. 


Per cent of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


1912 


11,710 


2,023 


17.28 


296 


2.53 


1913 


11,903 


2,081 


17.48 


296 


2.48 


1914 


11,610 


2,111 


18.J8 


273 


2.;55 


1915 


12,903 


2,258 


17.50 


311 


2.41 


1916 


13,191 


2,288 


17.35 


348 


2.64 


1917 


12,770 


1,973 


15.45 


340 


2.66 


1918 


12,656 


1,520 


12.01 


332 


2.62 


1919 


12,733 


1,854 


14.56 


310 


2.43 


1920 


12,836 


1,714 


13.35 


241 


1.87 


1921 


13,396 


1,762 


13.15 


316 


2.36 


1922 


14,004 


2,037 


14.55 


613 


4.38 


1923 


14,308 


2,061 


14.40 


419 


2.93 


1924 


14,554 


2,104 


14.45 


497 


3.41 



For years prior to 1912 see School Report of 1917. 



SCHOOL DEPART MR NT. 



227 



Table 19. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 26, 1924 
Junior High Schools. 





■r. 

.,2 


is* 


■c 




a£ 


2« 
fit- 1 


sSo| 




a o 




2* 


1) 


£.S i 




IjRADK. 


o 


^2>- 

S H ^ 
O o ® 
5i '-'5^ 


an 

£0 


"5 


p 


-1 ' 

^0 


Prom 
roppe 
after 
onths 




t-i 


=3 0.^" 






fc, flj 


^, 




•*^ 


Uj 






-^^ 


3)4= 1 














. -t-l 






I 


1.286 


1,054 


141 


91 






\ 


II 


1,075 


886 


135 


54 




i 


2 


III 


1,080 


977 


70 


33 






1 


Total 


3,441 


?'3'L 


346 


178 






4 







Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 26, 1924 

Junior High Schools. 





■M 


^ 






£cu 


0? 


Jd - 




3 




2'^ 




T30 


a>' 

bo 

£.5 


Otees 
dBac 
Two 
Trla 


(iKADE. 


if 

it 

a, 
i 


Uncondi 
Promo 

Next C 


an 

a. 




P 

a 




Prom 
Droppe 

after 
Months 


I 


1 

1 100 


82.0 


11.0 


7.0 






0.7 


II 


100 


82.4 


12.6 


5.0 






0.1 


III 


100 


90.0 


6.5 


3.5 






0.9 


Average 


100 


84.8 


10.1 


5.1 






1.0 



228 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 19A. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 26, 1924 



Elementary Grades. 



Grade. 


On June 
Promotion List. 

Unconditionally 

Promoted 
to next Grade. 


5 

•c 

E 
c 

u 

a. 




II 




SbC 
tS 3 

0) OS 

-J2 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 

after Three 
Months' Trial. 


I 

II 
III 
I\ 
V 
VI 


1,593 1,259 
1,472 1,254 
1,432 1,218 
1,347 1,154 
1,329 1,063 
1,244 1,094 


96 
84 
110 
113 
163 
100 


234 
125 
98 
76 
71 
36 


4 
9 
6 
4 
32 
14 


2 

1 

8 
3 


7 
2 

1 


Total 


8,417 , 7,042 


666 


640 


69 


24 


10 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 26, 1924 

Elementary Grades. 











1 


i> i. 


if 






Dt 


— 0) 






^•c 


B^ 


M ^ 




a,iJ 


«®^ 






2 «8 

9 *: 


2(» 


«§§.2 


(tRAUK. 


9c 

fl o 


fl P s 


1.5 


£ { 

T3 


■ -5^ 

flO 








OS 
o 

u 
0. 




SS 


05 




OJ en 

as 

CO 

*.0 


Pro 
Drop 

aft( 
Mont 


I 


100 


79.0 


14.7 


6.0 i 


0.3 


0.1 




II 


100 


85.1 


5.9 


8.4 


0.6 


0.6 


0.4 


m 


100 


85.1 


7.6 


6.8 


0.5 




0.1 


IV 


100 


85.7 


8.4 


5.7 i 


0.2 


0.7 


0.7 


V 


100 


80.0 


12.2 


5.4 ! 


2.4 


0.6 




VI 


100 


88.0 


8.1 


2.8 


1.1 


0.2 




Average. . . 


, 100 


83.7 


7.9 


7.6 


0.8 


0.2 


0.1 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



220 



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9i 



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en 

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230 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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Zr >•> 



Table 22 — Leave of Absence of Teachers 

Adela Balch, for one year ending June 30, 1925. 

Berta M. Burnett, for one year ending June 30, 1925. 

Edith V. Blood, for one year ending June 30, 1925. 

Marion Allen for six months beginning Sept. 1, 1924. 

Helen E. Harrington from Sept, 1 to Jan. 1, 1925. 

Marion A. Viets beginning Sept. 1, 1924 for an indefinite period. 

Jennie M. Twiss beginning Sept. 1. 1924 for an indefinite period. 



Cadets 



Lillian Andrews 
Mona Burke 
Eleanor Casey 
George K. Coyne 
Dorothea Crosby 
Pauline D. Dodge 



Ruth M. Drew- 
Mary Harrington 
Alice Frances Morgan 
Gladj^s M. Wellington 
Catherine Wiggins 
Helen Wilson 



Table 23 — Transfers of Teachers 



Tfeacher 
Francis J. Mahoney 
Estelle Crowe 
Hazel L. Smith 
Gladys M. H. Sullivan 
Helen L. Galvin 
Elsie M. Guthrie 
Hortense F. Small 



From 
Eastern 
Continuation 
Northeastern 
High 
Brown 
Cutler 
Lincoln 



To 

High 

High 

High 

Northeastern 

Northeastern 

Northeastern 

Cutler . 



Table 24. — Number of Teachers. 

FOR A .SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


High 
School. 

66t 


1912 


1913 


68t 


1914 


75T 


1915 


76t 


1916 


771 1 


1917 


701 \ 


1918 


70i 


1919 


70° 


1920 


69° 


1921 


75° ■ 


1922 


72t '■ 


1923 


75° 


1924 


76° 



Junior | Elemen- j Special ^^^^]^}f^^'' 
High tary I Teach- ^^^ ^" 



Schools. 



65 
108 
106 
118 
115 
114 
120 
117 



Schools. 



252* 
257* 

266* 
272* 
290* 
238* 
207* 
207* 
212* 
216t 
216t 
222t 
221 1 



22 
28 
30 
31 
30 
33 
28 
26 
23 
25 
22 
24 
24 



Charge of 
Room. 



5 < 



9 

12 

20 , 

15 1 

15 

17 

5 

1> 

8 

14 5 2 

16 5 2 

18 4 2 
16 4 2 



tlncludlng a secretary. *Tnclu<iiiit four kindergartners. 

tincluding seven kindergartners. 

olncluding a secretary and a matron 



Men. Women! Total . 



40 


309 


349 


39 


326 


365 


44 


347 


391 


45 


349 


394 


46 


366 


412 


49 


374 


423 


49 


369 


418 


48 


370 


418 


54 


371 


425 


60 


392 


452 


57 


390 


447 


55 


410 


465 


59 


401 


460 



234 AXNL'Ai. i:ei*okts. 

Table 25 — BOOKS AUTHORIZED FOR USE, 1924 
For High Schools 

As Text Books: — 

Book of ChorusevS. Silver. Biudett and Company. 

Plane Geometry, Diirell and Arnold. 

Advanced Dictation and Secretarial Training, with an accom- 
panying Budget of Forms and Classified Dictation Drills, by 
Reigner. 

Fortuna, by Perez Escrich, D. C. Heath and Company. 

La France et Les Francais. Pargment, The Macmillan Go. 

Un Jeune Homme Presse, Lehman, Henry Holt & Go. 

Conteurs Francais d'Aujoiird'hui, Michaud. D. G. Heath & Co. 

Le Pari d'un Lyceen, Chancel, Charles E. Merrill Go. 

Un Jeune Legionnaire. Erlande. Charles E. Merrill Co. 

La France et Sa Civilisation. Lanson et Desseignet. Henrv Holt 
& Co. 

French Idioms and Phrases. Cheney. Ginn & Co. 

La Poudre aux Yeux, Labiche et Martin, American Book Co. 

Les Miserables, Hugo. Charles Scribner's Sons. 

Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon. Labiche et Martin. D. C. Heath 
& Co. 

Biology for Beginners. Moon. Henry Holt & Co. 

History of the U. S.. Fife. Henry Holt & Co. 

History of the U. S., Beard and Beard, The Macmillan Go. 

Practical Map Exercises and Syllabus in American History, Bishop 
and Robinson. Ginn & Co. 

Practical Map Exercises and Syllabus in European History, Bishop 
and Robinson. Ginn & Co. 

Sentence and Theme. Ward, Scott, Foresman & Co. 

Captains Courageous. Kipling. Doubleday, Page & Co. 

Hugh Wynne, Mitchell, The Century Co. 

Short Stories for English Courses, Mikels. Charles Scribner's Sons. 

Present Day Essays. Knickerbocker, Henry Holt & Co. 

Types of Essays, Heydrick, Charles Scribner's Sons. 

A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After. Bok. Charles Scribner's Sons. 

The Making of an American, Riis, The Macmillan Go. 

Contemporary One-Act Plays. Lewis. Charles Scribner's Sons. 

Twelve Plays. Knickerbocker, Henry Holt & Co. 

Short Stories of Various Types, Charles E. Merrill Go. 

Secretarial Studies — Sorelle & Gregg, with accompanying Labora- 
tory Materials. Gregg Publishing Go. 

Second book in Algebra, Enlarged Edition. Durell and Arnold, 
Charles E. Merrill Co. 

As Desk Books : — 

Secretarial Dictation. Sorelle & Gregg. Gregg Publishing Co. 
As Reference Books: — 

Industrial Geographj', Whitbeck, American Book Company. 

For Junior High Schools 

As Text Books: — 

Cuentos v Lectures en Castellauo. Maria Solano. Silver. Burdett 

& Co. 
.Junior English Book. Hitchcock. Henry Holt & Co. 



sen (JO L DKl'AKTMEXT. 2^5 

For Elementary Schools 
As Text Books: — 
Basic Readers 

Home and Country Reader (Bk. 2 to 6), Little, Brown & Co. 
Bolenius Readers, Houghton Mifflin Co. 
The Elson Readers, Scott Foresman & Co. 
Supplementary Readers 

Robin Hood and His Merry Men, Rand, McNally & Co. 
King Arthur and His Knights, Rand, McNally & Co. 
Geography for Beginners, Rand, McNally & Co. 
Twilight Town, Little, Brown & Co. 
The Outdoor Books, Little, Brown & Co. 

Stories of U. S. for Youngest Readers, Educational Pub. Co. 
Red Feather Long Ago Series, Lyons and Carnahan. 
Our European Ancestors, Houghton Mifflin Co. 
The Circus Reader, Benjamin Sanborn & Co. 
Midway Readers ( Bk. 1, 2, 3), Laidlow Brothers. 
Sets of Three 

Pets and Companions, Ginn and Co. 
Myths of the Red Children, Ginn and Co. 
Sea Stories for Wonder Eyes, Ginn and Co. 
Stories Old and New, Ginn and Co. 
Wilderness Ways, Ginn and Co. 
Northern Trails, Ginn and Co. 
Wood Folks at School, Ginn and Co. 
A Little Brother to the Bear, Ginn and Co. 
Secret of the Woods, Ginn and Co. 
Ways of Wood Folks, Ginn and Co. 
( Pilgrim Stories, Rand, McNally & Co. 
Viking Tales, Rand, McNally & Co. 
Little Lives of Great Men, Rand, McNally & Co. 

Lincoln 

Washington 

Napoleon 

Frederick the Great 
Little Pioneers, Rand, McNally & Co. 
Bunny Rabbit's Diary, Little, Brown & Co. 
Log Cabin Days, Little, Brown & Co. 
Stories of Colonial Children, Educational Pub. Co. 
Robinson Crusoe, Educational Pub. Co. 
Stories of Our Holidays. Silver, Burdett & Co. 
Little Home Workers, Benjamin Sanborn & Co. 
Desk Copies 

Busy Builders at Work, Ginn and Co. 

Mary of Plymouth, American Book Co. 

Seth of Colorado 

Peter of Amsterdam 

Antoine of Oregon 

Philip of Texas 

Martha of California 

Benjamin of Ohio 

Calvert of Maryland 

Good Citizenship, American Book Co. 

Play Awhile. Little. Brown & Co. 

Children of the Palm Lands. Educational Pub. Co. 

Work-a-Day Doings on the Farm, Silver, Burdett & Co. 

In Fable Land, Silver Burdett & Co. 

Amer. History Plays for Little Americans, Benjamin Sanborn & CJo. 

Citizenship Plays. Benjamin Sanborn & Co. 

The Winston Simplilied Dictionary, John C. Winston Co. 

The Winston Simplified Dictionary, John C. Winston Co. 

Primary Edition 



236 ANXIAL REPORTS. 



Table 26— HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

The graduation exercises of the Hi^li School occurred 
Monday, June 23, 1924. 



OSCAR W. CODDING, Chairman of the School 
Committee, Presiding. 

1. OVERTURE— "William Tell" Rossini 

High School Orchestra. Oliver W. Holmes, Leader 

2. PRAYER— Rev. George E. Leighton 

Pastor First Universalist Church 

3. SINGING — "The Heavens. Resounding" Beethoven 

Graduating Class 

4. CLASS ORATION— "Youth's Responsibility" 

Basil Mills 

5. PIANO SOLO— "Concert Etude in D Flat" Liszt 

Catherine Carver 

6. CLASS POEM— "Youth Goes Forth" 

John A. Holmes 

7. SINGING— "The Caravan Song" Chadwick 

Semi-Chorus 

8. ADDRESS TO GRADUATES 

John A. Cousens, LL. D.. 
President of Tufts College 

9. ORGAN SOLO— "Otfertoire in B Flat" Read 

Florence Cooper 

10. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO GIRLS 

11. SINGING— "The Gypsy Life" Balfe 

Graduating Class 

12. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO BOYS 

13. SINGING— "Class Ode" 

Graduating Class 

14. March — "The NC-4" Bigelow 

Orchestra 

Singing and orchestra under the direction of James P. McVey, 
Supervisor of Music in the Public Schools. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMKNT. 



237 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



June, 1924 
*Graduate(i with honor 



Ethel May Aikens 
Adelle Cecelia Allen 
Claire Ruth Andarson 
Esther Marie Anderson 
Mary Elizabeth Anderson 
Helen Marie Ash 
Emma Victoria Louise Atley 

*Ruth Jeanette Bain 
Clara Baker 
Mona King Baker 
Petronilia Mary Balboni 
Alice Morse Belden 
Adelaide Norma Bensaia 
Helen Rose Bergen 
Ruth Linnell Berry 
Philomena Mildred Bianco 
Rose Blish 

Bertha Kathryn Bockman 
Florence Maria Bond 
Elizabeth Lovering Bowser 
Sybil Isabelle Boyce 
Marguerite May Boynton 
Ruth Elizabeth Brann 
Edith Otillia Braun 
Mary Alma Brosseau 
Alice Mae Brown 
May Gertrude Brown 
Miriam Rae Brown 

♦Frances Linnette Bullen 

* Dorothy Lillian Burgess 
Frances Lilla Burhart 
Inda Elizabeth Butler 
Celia Frances Capodano 
Helen Esther Carey 
Marjorie Isabel Carl 
Beatrice Evelyn Carr 
Terrilia Catherine Carver 

*Alice Frances Chandler 
Doris Churchill 
Eleanor May Clark 
Dorris Mae Clough 

♦Esther Molly Cohen 
Rebecca Cohen 
Emilie Bartlett Cole 
Elizabeth Rose Collins 
Irene Frances Collins 
Margaret Mary Collins 
Ruth Anna Collins 
Anna Margaret Coneeny 
Angela Flavan Conlan 



Irene Mildred Council 
Florence Emily Cooper 

*Katherine Cooper 
Mary Theresa Corcoran 
Winnifred Esther Coville 

♦Berenice Cecile Coyne 
Dorothy May Cragin 
Gladys Catherine Crawford 
Margaret Rita CuUinane 
Mildred Elizabeth Cullington 
Doris Wharff Gushing 
Dorothy Louise Gushing 
Madelon Custer 
Mary Caroline Davis 
Loretta Emma Daykin 
Katherine Irene Patricia Dolan 
Reta Hawes Donaldson 

♦Doris Dow 
Minnie Mildred Duchin 
Edith Marion Duggan 
Clarice Raymond Dunbar 
Anna Rita Dunleavey ^ 
Madalen Rose Dwyer 

♦Gretta Louise Dyas 

♦Avis Bates Eaton 

♦Helen Marguerite England 
Florence Virginia English 
Mabelle Elizabeth Everett 
Florence Adelaide Ewell 
Dorothy Elizabeth Faulkner 
Rose Louise Felt 
Helen Elizabeth Fenton 
Louise Marie Ferretti 
Bernice Margaret Fitzpatrick 
Ruth Claire Flanagan 
Elizabeth Frances Flynn 
Catherine Agnes Foley 

♦Dorothy May Ford 
Lillian May Fowler 
Ruth Fowler 

Marion Lawrence Francis 
Rena Stanlay French 
Anna Marie Frizzell 
Natalie Ruth Fuhrman 
Constance Mary Garrod - 
Beulah May Glidden 
Flora Gordon 
Ruby Bertha Graves 
Mildred Geneva Gray 
Nellie Eudora Gray 



2:^8 



ANNUAL RRPORTS. 



Marion Louise Grimes 

Marion Alberta Grout 

Evelyn Caroline Grush 
*Stella Marie Guazzaloca 

Hattie Josephine Hall 

Ruth Taska Hall 

Ruth Ida Hallington 

Alice May Hamilton 

Katharine Emily Hamilton 

Dorothea Harriet Hanscom 

Mildred Ella Hanson 

Barbara Chase Harding 

Isabel Crockett Harding 

Mary Alice Harrington 

Marjorie Orcutt Harts 

Ruth Eleanor Hassett 

Harriet Hyde Hawes 
*Greta Christina Hedlund 

Eleanor Rebecca Hellmann 

Elizabeth Winifred Hennigan 

Helen Elizabeth Herrick 

Rachel Gould Herrig 

Elma Louise Hill 
*Lillian Kathryn Hillman 

Marjorie Chapman Hobbs 

Alice Coan Hopkins 

Annie Elizabeth Horan 

Edna Rose Howe 

Bessie Doris Howland 

Beatrice Louise Hughes 

Eleanor Ensworth Humiston 

Elinor May Hurley 

Gertrude Ensley Hutchinson 

Mildred Lucille Hutchinson 
*Doris Mildred Hyde 

Gladys Lucella Jaques 

Elizabeth Jeremiah 

Mary Evelyn Keeley 

Louise Nona Kelley 

Bertha Clyde Kelty 

Margaret Emily Kendall 

Agnes Mary Kennedy 

Kathryn Kenny 
♦Lillian May Kingston 

Marjorie Knox 

Margaret Eileen Kuhn 

Natalie Alice Latham 

Catherine Corrine Lavey 

Mary Etta Leddy 

Hazel Gladys Leith 

Helena Mary Leyden 

Ruth Eleanor Linderholm 

Louise Susan Lindsey 

Mildred Josephine Locke 

Catherine Agnes Long 

Ethel Mary Lowney 

Esme Marguerite Heppell Lucas 
♦Eleanor Josephine Mac<1onald 

Mildred Leona Macdonald 

Helen Bradford Macfarlane 



Florence Mary MacKrillivray 
Mary Jeanette MacGillivray 
Merl MacGillivray 
Mary Anna MacKenzie 
Dorothy Frances MacKinnon 
Grace Evelyn MacLachlan 
Elisabeth Maddison 
Margaret Elizabeth Malvey 
Christine Louise Matheson 
Inez Kathryn McAfee 
Dorothy Margaret McAnern 
Louise Mae McCarty 
Gertrude' Ruth McMenimen 
Ellen Agnes Mekkelsen 
Dorothy Rose Mellett 
Margaret Elizabeth Mellett 
Lillian Emily Milano 
Marguerite Milner 
Eileen Veronica Moloy 
Agnes Theresa Moore ^ 

Alice Moore 
Helen Ashley Moore 

♦Marion Grace Moore 
Alice Josephine Moran 
Alice Mary Morris 
Myrtle Elizabeth Morrissey 

♦Mildred Frances Moses 
V^elma Irene Moses 
Aroosiag Ruth Movsessian 
Helen Gladys Murphy 
Sara Margaret Newcoml>e 
Marion Aloysia Newell 

♦Dorothy Thurston Newman 
Catherine Frances Noreau 
Mary Katharine O'Connor 
Rebecca ?vIacVeigh Oliver 
Katherine Frances O'Loughlin 
Lillian Mae Olsen 
Esther Margaret O'Rourke 
Hattie May Orr 
Doris Avery Page 
Ruth Mary Patersou 
Loretta Mabelle Patterson 
Ruth Jones Payrow 
Kathryn Merrill Peak 
Ruth Wilbur Pickard 
Clara Jacqualine Portesi 
Elinor Wakefield Powers 
Esther Lucy Prescott 
Frances Molly Pugatch 
Mary Agnes Quinn 
Dorothy Mae Ranger 

♦Mary Ransom 
Marjorie Montgomery Read 
Beatrice Louise Rend 
Dorothy Elizabeth Reud 
Priscilla Ripley 
Geraldine Robinson 
Marion Alice Roche 
Madelyne Wippen Roffe 



SC'HOOl. DKI'ART.M KNT. 



239 



Dora Margaret Rogers 

Lydia Ariel Ross 

Allerie Mauriel Rowe 
♦Eunice Margaret Russell 

Mildred Ann Ryan 

Evelyn Irene Ryer 

Margaret Teresa Sam m on 

Elsie Evelyn Sandvold 

Almas Sarkesian 

Ida Marguerite Sawin 

Stefana Scavitto 

Linnet Byrd Schwartz 

Madelyn Flora Scott 

Josephine Mary Seretto 

Sara Sherburne 

Mildred Herberta Shirley 

Margaret Elizabeth Sliney 

Anna Marion Sloane 
*Melvina Allan Smillie 
*Bertha Frances Smith 
♦Bessie May Smith 

Helen Mae Smith 

Hester Frances Smith 

Ida Louise Smith 
♦Mildred Nickerson Smith 

Virginia Amina Smith 

Margaret Frances SneH ■ 
♦Elizabeth Crawford Sonier 

Elizabeth Mary Stacey 

Constance Rose Steed 

Esther Helen Sullivan 

Dorothy Spence Summerhayes 

Elin Alfreda Swanson 

Frances Marie Swinehamer 

Mary Phyllis Ta Kash 

Marion Elizabeth Tarr 

Margaret Beatteay Taylor 

Elizabeth Thompson 

Evelyn Elizabeth Thompson 

Margaret Timpe 

Helen Marie Tolstrup 
♦Sophie Regina Truelson 

Esther Mae Tucker 

Barbara Tuttle 

Mary Frances Vacaro 

Mildred Eleanor Van Arsdalen 

Elizabeth Van Cor 

Eleanor Van Ummersen 

Helen Elizabeth Wahlstrom 

Helen Maria Walsh 

Helen Veronica Walsh 

Phyllis Cass Wardrobe 

Marguerite Sarah Waterman 

Helen Waters 

Viola Littlefield Watts 

Verona Annie Whitcomb 

Catherine Edna White 

Dorothy Mary White 

Ethel Amelia Whittier 
*Edith Gladys Wilkins 



Celeste Carolyn Wood 
r^lsie May Wood 
Dorothy Allen Wyman 
Louise Maxine Yacubiau 



Hugo Gordon Anderson 
Albert Baker 

Charles Harrison Barrett 
Robert Hugh Bates 
Wallace Clark Baxter 
John Hunnewell Beedle 
Edgar Daniel Behenna 
*Dwight Elbert Bellows 
*George Kenhett Benham 
Raymond Forbes Bennett 
Walter Stephen B6nnett 
Louis Charles Berman 
Matthew Joseph Bettencourt 
Alfred Thomas Bibby 
Philip Leslie Bidmead 
Newman Maurice Biller 
Edward John Blair 
Charles Woodford Bliss 
Charles Florindo Bocchino 
Maxwell Delmore Boyd 
George Edward Bradley 
John Patrick Brophy 
Elliot Couden Brown 
Thomas Alexander Brown 
William Edward Brown 
John William Burke 
Randolph Thomas Burleigh 
Thomas Elmer Burns 
Everett Gould Buxton 
Benjamin Bearse Gaboon, Jr. 
Romeo Achilles Calderoni 
Paul Felix Calzolari 
Curtis Campbell 
George Kenneth Campbell 
Saverio Antonio Capodiliipo 
Kefineth George Carnes 
William Francis Casey 
Julius Bernard dayman 
James Joseph Coffey 
Francis Leo Coffin 
Frank Shepard Coggin 
Eben Thomson Colby 
Clifford Douglass Cole 
Francis Gilman Collier 
Walter Ernest Collins 
Harry Mark Connelly 
William Oliver Corliss 
James Joseph Cotter 
Leo Francis Cotter 
William Francis Crocker 
Vincent Robert Cronin 
Allan Herbert Crosby 
Francis Charles Crotty 
James Edward Cruickshank 



240 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Edmund James Ciwick 
John Charles Daley 
Noobar Danielian 
Arthur Francis DePadua 
Anthony Wallace DiCecca 
Anthony DiCredico 
Gerald Forde Dineen 
John Bernard Dolan 
Frank Sidney Dole 
Thurlow Jackson DoUiff 
Hugh William Duffy 

♦Samuel Milton Dupertuis 
Milton Frederick Dyke 
Harry Edelstein 
Henry Alexander Eksted 
Clifford Eugene Ells 
George Oliver Emery 

♦Charles Phillip Engelhardt, 
Stanley Howard Englund 
Stuart Andrew Englund 
Norman Byster 
George Frederick Fardy 
Malcolm Joseph Farrell 
Harold Stanley Ferguson 
James Joseph Fitzgerald 
Francis Xavier Foley 
Clarence Kendall Eraser 
Orland Edward Fritz 
Atherton Graydon Fryer 
Harvey Reginald Fuller, Jr. 
Charles William Gaffney 
Reginald Packer Geer 
Rocco iGiannantonio 
Carl Edward Giannone 
Ernest Clifford Goodspeed 
George Emory Gordon 
John Albert Gorman 
John Joseph Griffin 
Francis Michael Hanley 
Roy Stanley Hanslick 
William George Harrington 
Herbert Francis Hart 
Edward Stone Hawes 
Charles Herman Hellmann 
Harold Arthur Hilton 
Kenneth Busell Hofmann 
Felix William Hogan 
Frederick Duhn Hoitt 
John Milton Holden 
John Albert Holmes, Jr. 
Oliver Wardman Holmes 
Robert Webster Holmes 
John Stanley Hull 
Warren Lee Johanson 
Howard Chester Johnson 
Wilmot William Jones 
Edgar Norman Josephson 
Raymond Anthony Kaspar 
Charles Gerard Keleher 
Joseph Vincent Kelley 



John Jerome Kelliher 
John Henry Kelly 
Walter Winchester Kelly 
Norwood Davis Kenney 
Edward Kiley 
Selwyn Colgate Killam 
Charles Henry Kilty 
Charles William Knowlton 
Edwin Russell Knox 
John Mark Kolligian 
Joseph Leahy 
James Moore Logan 
Charles Edward Lyons 
John Finlay MacKenzie 
John Francis Maguire 
Richard Aloysius Maguire 
William John Mahoney 
Jr. Albert Charles Malloy 
Manuel Richard Maness 
George Nishan Mangurian 
Wallis Ernest Mann 
James Clifford Marchant 
Allen Littletield Martin 
Aram Charles Matthewsian 
Raymond Earle McLaughlin 
Harold Anthony Medeiros 
Willis Allen Megathlin 
Robert Basil Mills 
John Joseph Mohan 
John Anthony Mongan 
Raymond Stanley Moore 
Edwin Francis Murphy 
John Raymond Murphy 
James Nargisian 
Harris Ford Neil 
Charles Gilbert Newcombe 
Ripley Edwin Nickerson 
George Edward Ninde 
Charles Brendon O'Connor 
George Alphonsus O'Connor 
Albert Charles Oliver 

*John Edward O'Loughlin 
• Christopher Cornelius O'Neill 
Jacob Nazar Panjarjian 
Allen Smith Perrins 
Edward Walter Peters 
Howard Alexander Petrie 
Clarance Hooper Phelps 
Howard Brown Phillips 
Edward Francis Powers 
Albert Benjamin Pullo 
John Sheridan Queenan 
John Domenic Raffi 

*Charles Kimball Ranger 
Joseph Edward Reegan 
Joseph Donovan Riley 
Charles Isaiah Roberts 
Herbert Elias Robertson 
William Joseph Rodwell 
Robert Arnold Rogers 



SC HOOL DEPARTMENT. 



241 



Richard Everett Rolls 
Robert Joseph Ryan 
Marston Cleaves Sargent 
Sarkis Giragos Sarkisian 
Carl Franklin Saunders 
George Henry Saunders 
George Richard Savani 
Benjamin Shapiro 
Chester Joseph Sheerin 
*Arthur Hyman Slafsky 
Carl Norton Smith 
"William Kenneth Soar 
Irving Gravely Spering 
William Leonard Stevens, Jr. 
John Landers Stewart 
Frederick Joseph Stynes 
Edward Clifford Sullivan 
Richard Durant Sullivan 
Raymond Milton Swift 
Leslie Franklin Thompson 



Franklin Bowker Thurston 
* Richard Tousey 
Anthony Traniello 
Stanley Dunham Truelson 
Willard Stevens Tuttle 
Kenneth Surell Ulm 
George Jenkins Urlwin 
John Van Ounsem 
Richard Currier Waldron 
Robert Irwin Wallace 
Francis Henry Webber 
Abraham Joseph Weisman 
Julius Ernest Weiss 
William Edward Welch 
Rodney Eastman Whittemore 
Fred Ernest Wilson 
Charles Ralph Worters 
Frederick Zappini, Jr. 
Alexander George Zographos, Jn 



1>42 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Junior High School graduations occurred in the school 
buildings on June 23, 1924. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



Northeastern 



Helen Lillian Aikins 
Bruce Lee Alexander 
Charles F. Allard 
Francis J. Allard 
Norma M. Allen 
Frank Richard Andersen 
Harold C. Anderson 
Josephine M. R. Angelo 
Anna Marj^ Arata 
Clyde Melvin Armstrong 
Prank Norman Armstrong 
Stanley John Articary 
Violette Frances Ayer 
Clifford D. Bain 
Wesley Houghton Baker 
Eleanor Evelyn Balboni 
Blanche Elaine Baptista 
Mary Louise Baro 
Nella A. Baroni 
Marguerite Elizabeth Bassett 
Grace B. Beattie 
Laura M. Bellamacina* 
Dorothy E. Benjamin 
Mildred Helen Berry 
-Jennie Evelyn Blackadar 
P. Albert Blanche 
!Helen Thompson Blish 
-Angelina A. Bocchino 
-Joseph William Bollard 
Louise Gertrude Bolton 
Hobert W. Bolton 
-Anthony Bonanno 
Frederick J. Bowen 
-Edward J. Breen 
>Bileen Doris Breen 
-Ellen Frances Brennan 
IFrancis Brennan 
John Brown 

Manuel Louis Brown, Jr. 
Mary Catherine Bruno 
Bernardine Buccelli 
Hobert J. Buckley 
Cleante E. Bullio 
Elsie Mary Burke 
Helen R. Burke 
Thomas F. Burke 
Alice Margaret Burns 
John James Burns 
Evelyn Frances Burnside 
Charles Frederick Bussell 
James Edwin Butters 



Harriet C. Caldwell 
Anna May Callahan 
Mildred Gertrude Carev 
George E. Carter, Jr. 
Mary Agnes Casey 
Anna J. Cashman 
Gennario Caso 
Raymond J. Cavicchio 
Cornelius Joseph Chambers 
Dorothy Lydia Cheney 
Serafina Frances Ciambelli 
Helen E. Clement 
John Joseph Clifford 
Esther Annie Cohen 
Roger Cohen 
Sarah Cohen 
Mary F. Coit 
Kenneth Collins 
Marguerite F. Comeau 
Helen M. Conlin 
Anna P. Cook 
Mildred Katherine Corey 
Margaret Cecilia Corkum 
Muriel E. Cox 
Richard William Cox 
John Francis Coyle 
Eva J. Cragg 
Lambert Cronin 
Louise Eunice Croniu 
Raymond Clifford Cronin 
Michael F. Crowley 
George C. Cullen 
Harrison Eugene Cummings 
Sumner W. Curtis 
George A. Daily 
John Dangora 
John B. Davidson 
Bertram Eugene Davis 
Warren Ralph Day 
Anthony Joseph DeGeorge 
Margaret R. Delaney 
Lillian Dorothy DeMita 
Vincent J. DeMlta 
Archibald George DeMone 
Ruth Devine . 
Amleto Michael DiGiusto 
James H. Dingee 
Dorothy May Dixon 
Priscilla O. Dodge 
Alice Helen Doherty 
Francis X. Dolan 



SCHOOL DEPAKTM KN'1\ 



243 



Frederick Dolaii 
Frank W. Dolloff 
George Florian Donegal! 
Ruth Elizabeth Dougall 
Thomas Magiiire DXiggan 
Dorothy Veronica Durant 
Mary Louise Eag'an 
Marion H. East 
Paul Brj'^an Eaton 
John Edwin Elliott 
Ehvood Eugene Ellis 
Mildred Florence Elwin 
Marguerite Mary Ernst 
Lewis Melvin Faber 
Lillian M. Fairbairn 
Marguerite Josephine Farley 
Mary Valentine Farley 
Elizabeth R. Farrell 
Virginia Hughes Farrington 
Marion V. Farrow 
Elizabeth May Faulkner 
Ethel Frances Fay 
George F. Finigan 
James A. Fisher 
Myron C. Fisher. Jr. 
Grill Howard Fitz 
Herbert L. Fitzgerald 
Margaret Mary Fitzgerald 
Katherine May Flanagan 
Richard E. Flynn, Jr. 
Francis Charles Foley 
Margaret Kathryn Foley 
Gladys Dorothy Forbes 
William S. Forsyth 
Fred L. Fowler 
Robert A. Fowler 
Philip Angelo Franzosa 
Mildred Alfrida Friberg 
Aubrey Leslie Fritz 
Harold Sutherland Furness 
Aldo A. G alien i 
Lillian Frances Gammon 
Ralph Lawson Garrett 
Dante Louis Gattoni 
Mildred M. Gaudet 
Sadie Katherine Glacobbe 
Charles Gigante 
Paul Gilbert 
Margaret Jean Gilroy 
Myer Goldstein 
George H. Goodwin 
Evelyn Florence Gordon 
Ann Lantry Grady 
James Jeremiah Grady 
Paul Grandison Grady 
John A. Graham 
Mabelle Rita Graham 
Jennie S. Gramatis 
Delaphene Anna Gratcyk 
Barbara Heloise Greene 



H. Clifton Gustin 

Winifred Hails 

Edith P. Hall 

Madeline Hammond 

Kathryn C. Hayward 

Wesley F. Haywood 

Edythe F. Hazelton 

Margaret G. Heafey 

Edith Mary Hebert 

Helen Heos 

Thelma G. Hill 

Ad oris F. Hogue 

Richard Francis Holmes 

James E. Horan 

Margaret Catherine Hourihan 

Arthur J. Howe 

Alice Burnadette Hurley 

Muriel L. Jex 

Fred Thomas Johnson 

Charles Arthur Jones 

Gilbert Maurice Jones 

William C. Jones 

Veronica R. Kane 

Christine Mary Keith 

Thomas Francis Kelleher 

Mary Anna Kennedy 

William Francis Kennedy 

William Curran Kiley 

Eva Wilson Kimpton 

Ruth M. Kimpton 

Muriel Pearson King 

Walter R. Kinneen 

Lucy S. Kingston 

Earle Bonney Knapp 

Gertrude O. Kohler 

Charles H. Krant 

Jennie L. Langone 

Edmund Francis Laurendeau 

Joseph J. Leary 

Margery LeBaron 

Dorothy Lillian Leeman 

Helen LeMay 

Anna Louise Lomasney 

Pasquale Henry Lombardl 

Philomena Lombardi 

Dorothy M. Long 

Helen Margaret Long 

Lillian Mae Loveless 

Sidney H. Levering 

Howard Marshall Lowell 

Leslie E. Luscombe 

Thomas Francis Lyons 

Ruth Mabey 

Ina Helen MacCaskill 

Elmer MacKinnon 

Mary Elizabeth MacNeill 

Helen J. Mahoney 

Mary Agnes Mahoney 

William Taft Major 

Marjorie H. Mann 



244 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Heleu M. Mauniug 
Irene Dora March 
Israel Marcus 
Kermit Colbath Marsh 
Sterling Eldridge Martell 
John Martignetti 
Byron N. Martin 
Helen Viola Martin 
Edmund Massello 
Daniel Joseph McCarthy 
iNlarion Kathleen McCarthy 
Letitia L. McConologue 
Rose Dorothy McGrath 
Elizabeth Mary McKinnon 
Walter N. McKinnon 
Catherine Mary McLaughlin 
John Day McLaughlin 
Violet Mary McNaught 
William H. McNelley 
Arthur Mello 
Mary Beatrice Mellow 
Beatrice Rose Metzger 
Benedetta Milano 
Joseph Millin 
Frederick Louis Minzner 
Rose Mirabile 
Gertrude H. Moran 
Mary Josephine Morris 
Michael Mortelli 
Frances Eleanor Mullen 
Caroline Agnes Murphy 
Francis T. Murphy 
Grace Josephine Murphy 
Helen Elizabeth Murphy 
Helen Rita Murphy 
Kathryn V. Murphy 
William Joseph Murphy 
Thomas Francis Murray 
Raymond Lincoln Nason 
Anna L. Newman 
Mary Josephine Noreau 
Effie Moss Noseworthy 
Kenneth P. Nunn 
Francis A. O'Brien 
Helen Edwina O'Brien 
Paul O'Brien 
Arthur O'Connell 
George O'Connell 
Edna Rose Oliver 
Joseph O'Neil 
John Francis O'Rourke 
Oliver Osgood 
George Nicholas Panartos 
Catherine Papathanasi 
Geraldine M. Pare 
Bryant William Patten 
Philip Ormsby Peasley 
James Neil Peistrup 
Louis F. Pellegrini 
Belle Adalyn Petit 



Thomas Francis Polette 

Arnold T. Poller 

Phosa I. Porter 

Ruth W. Powell 

Katherine Marie Powers 

Goodwin Ryder Prentiss 

Earle Howard Prescott 

Norma Lee Preston 

Harold Lloyd Prince 

Idah Pugatch 

Thomas Punzo 

John Harold Quinlan 

Annie Theresa Quinn 

Mary J. Quinn 

Dorothy Edith Ralston * 

Helen Marie Ranaghan 

Anna M. Reardon 

Gladys R. Reardon 

Helen Ruth Reardon 

James Martin Patrick Redmond 

Frank Reynolds 

Gertrude Reynoids 

Jeannette Margaret Richardson 

Ruth Ann Riley 

Frank Ringer 

Carleton Bartlett Ripley 

ClilTord W. Robie 

Evelyn Rose Robinson 

Mary Dorothy Rogan 

Martha Russell Rogers 

Eugene F. Rohwedder 

Lambert Joseph Ronayne 

Margaret Helen Rosetta 

Beatrice May Ross 

Ernest R. R. Ruggles 

Betty S. Russell 

Svea G. Russell 

Bridget Christina Ryan 

Stephen J. Ryan 

Jennie Marsh Sachs 

Thora Himes Sanderson 

Vaughan B. Sanford Jr. 

Maurice Llewellyn Sellers 

J. Albert Shaw Jr. 

Mildred Cathleen Shea 

Celia A. Shepard 

Jessie Shepherd 

Asa P. Siggens 

Lillian Grace Silliker 

Oliver G. Sinclair 

Ira D. Smith 

Loretta Sousa 

Donald G. Spaulding 

Alma Frances Spiers 

Frank Spignese 

Ernest Joseph Spurio 

Lester N. Stanley 

John Armstrong Stewart Jr. 

Thomas P. Stewart Jr. 

Catherine V. Sullivan 



SCHOOL DKPAirr.MEXT. 



24n 



Eleuore Elizabeth Sullivan 

John Melville Sullivan 

Margaret Helen Sullivan 

Margaret Marj^ Sullivan 

Marguerite A. Sweeney 

Abraham Taitelbaum 

Anthony Vincent Taurani 

Florence May Taylor 

Henry Taylor 

Robert William Taylor 

Albert E. Thompson 

Margaret Harriet Thompson 

Eleie Belle Tibbetts 

Leon C. Tibbetts 

Richard Francis Tobin 

Anna Marian Toland 

Walter H. Tomlinson 

Mary B. Toomey 

Graydon Elliot Toothaker 

Mary Louise Traynor 

Edmund Bartholomew Tremblay 



Jennie Alice Truskolasky 

Ann Caroline Tucker 

Doris Evelyn Turner 

Lewis Charles Tuttle 

Leonard Norbert Tyler 

Thomas Valery Veale 

Benedict Ventura 

Alfred Stephen Vercellini 

Paul Francis McCormack Videritti 

Gladys Frances Wagner 

Grace Loretta Walsh 

Dorothy Catherine Watkins 

Rosamond Watson 

Robert Watts 

Everett B. Wheeler 

Helen Lois Woodbury 

Charles Winthrop Worthley 

Helen A. Wright 

John W. Wright 

A. Margaret Yacopucci 



Southern 



Virgilio G. Aiello 
David William Alves 
Ezra Andelman 
J. Ralph Andelman 
Edith Louise Anderson 
Evelyn Esther Austin 
Helen E. Ayles 
Mary Bab in 
Attilia Mary Balboni 
Dorando Peter Balboni 
Margaret P. Ball 
Eleanor L. Baratta 
Henry Eugene Baratta 
Allan Lane Barton 
Mary Josephine Basile 
Mary Elizabeth Bedingfield 
Clarence J. Behenna 
Helen Elizabeth Beljan 
Pearl Esther Bengonzie 
William Joseph Bergen 
Peter Anthony Bertocci 
Ethel Greta Blaisdell 
M. Manuel Blank 
Ruth M. Blood 
Thomas D. Bloomer 
Rose Natalie Bonanno 
Ralph William Boone 
Joseph Borgati 
Marguerite Helen Bouchie 
Frederick Joseph Breen 
Mary Louise Brett 
Mary Rita Bridges 
John Joseph Brown 
Lena Ida Buchman 



Hilda L. Buonomo 
James Thomas Burnett 
Evelyn Mae Butler 
Mary Ameilia Cabral 
Catherine M. Calandrella 
Joseph Francis Callahan 
Mary Gertrude Galium 
Joseph Campagna 
Anna C. Canniff 
Lena M. Capodanno 
Lawrence P. Capodilupo 
Laura Carbone 
Robert William Card 
James Joseph Carney 
Lawrence Carra 
Anthony Louis Chiesa 
Janet E. Clark 
John J. Coffey 
Louva Frances Cogswell 
Donald Joseph Collins 
Alice Whidden Conroy 
Annie Rita Conway 
John Joseph Conway 
Ruth G. Copithorne 
Walter Joseph Corbett 
Joseph Ryan Corish 
Gertrude Madeline Coyle 
Raymond Francis Crocker 
Clyde A. Crosby 
Thomas Grotty 
Alfreda Emma Dagnino 
Vincent Joseph Damiano 
Dorothy Louise Davies 
Dominic Joseph DeLorenzo 



246 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Vincent P. .Dente 
Helen Josephine Dermady 
Inez DeSimone 
James Francis Devereaiix 
Francis DiCecca 
Anthony DiSilva 
Doris A. Dixon 
Edgar Cecil Docherty 
Elizabeth Margaret Dolan 
Timothy Francis Donnellan 
Edward Joseph Doran 
Edward James Downey 
John Francis Downey 
Manuel Charles Duarte 
Edward T. Dunlea 
Stnart H. Edwardes 
Harold Thomas Edwards 
Mary Ellis 
Edward A. Ellison 
Muriel S. Erlandson 
Lillian Elizabeth Elliott 
Ethel Irene Fallon 
Edward J. Falls 
Edmund Leo Fantelli 
Lewis W. Farrar 
Anna Lucy Feener 
Bernard Francis Fenton 
James E. Ferg-uson 
Thomas William Fitzgerald 
Charles Arthur Fitzgibbon 
Francis Vincent Fitzpatrick 
Edward J. Flood 
Joseph Patrick Flynn 
Thomas W. Flynn 
Arthur Robertson Fogg 
Albert E. Foley 
Arthur William Foley 
Edward Patrick Foley 
Mary Elizabeth Foley 
Dorothea Regina Forrest 
Joseph Edward Foster 
Lillian May Foster 
Helen P. Frizzell 
Francis T. Gallagher 
John Joseph Galligan 
Carina Gandolfi 
Gilbert Francis Gannon 
Alfred Peter Gardner 
Anne Louise Garrity 
G. Haskell Caspar 
Jennie Matilda Gilbert 
Margaret Elizabeth Gillen 
Adrienne Gioconda Gilli 
Chester L. Gilliatt 
William W. Gillis 
Samuel Goldberg 
P'rances M. Gordon 
George C. Gormley 
William Joseph Govang 
Benjamin Robert Graham 



Edith Graham 
Margaret Graham 
Mildred A. Greenlaw 
Richard Henry Greilach 
Francis Grifhn 
William Joseph Griffin 
Esther Grossman 
Alice Stella Haggertv 
Abbie M. Hall 
Charles Edward Hamilton 
Louis Arthur Hamilton Jr. 
Robert Henry Hanlon 
Ruth Marion Hanlon 
Gertrude Elizabeth Harer 
Joseph Bernard Harte 
M. Louise Hartshorn 
Marion Katherine Hastings 
Rose Catherine Hess 
Herbert Edward Hill 
Doris Frances Hinsman 
Edward E. Holden 
William R. Houley 
Wilbur C. Irving 
Alice E. Johnson 
Elmer G. Johnson 
Robert D. Johnston 
John Joyce 
Emily M. Kawabe 
Elmer William Keane 
Margaret Agnes Keane 
Edward Francis Kelley 
Marguerite Bernice Kelley 
Theresa C. Kelley 
Caroline Kinder 
James J. King 
Francis A. Kirk 
Goldie Klayman 
Daniel Kratman 
Earl William Landry 
Catherine Floi'ence Lane 
Joseph A. Lane 
Everett Milton Langley 
Ambrose L. Lanigan 
Edward Tenney Leadbetter 
Edna Margaret Leddy 
Thomas Matthew Lee 
William James Lee 
Ethena Levas 
Florence A. Lewis 
Isabella Margaret Leyden 
Manuel C. Lima 
Harriet Ruth Logan 
Frieda E. Lundberg 
Philip Arnold Lynch 
Paul Allen Maclnnis 
C. Lester MacKay 
Florence Lillian MacKay 
John J. Mahan 
Mary Alice Maloney 
Theresa Manning 



SCHOOL DKl'AHTMKXT. 



247 



Charles S. Margosian 
Joseph Marino 
Clara Elizabeth Marshall 
Alice Jeaunette Martin 
John L. Mason 
Vincelovia Matiilis 
Ethel Helenor McCarthy 
John Joseph McCarthy 
Joseph D. McCarthy 
Josephine Frances McCarthy 
Mary Josephine McCarthy 
Patrick Joseph McCarthy 
Paul LeRoy McCue 
Mary Katheryn McDermotl 
John J. McDevitt 
John J. McDonnell 
Jolin J. McDonough 
Genevieve Edith McFaiin 
John Frederic McGann Jr. 
Thomas McGovern 
George Francis McGowan 
Daniel James McHugh 
Edward S. Mclsaac 
Mary Louise McKinnon 
Emily: Marie McLaughlin 
Lawrence E. McMenimeii 
George Edward McNamara 
Albert P. McSweeney 
Myles James McTernan 
Alice E. Miller 
Charles W. Mitchell 
Theresa M. Mitchell 
George Albert Moors 
John Joseph Morley 
Mazie Catherine Morrison 
Nellie Isabelle Morrison 
Catherine C. Murphy 
Ethel Elizabeth Murphy 
Mary G. Murray 
James V. Musto 
John Francis Noonan 
Samuel Norris 
Audrey Jeanne Nowell 
Richard William Obear 
John Joseph O'Brien 
Mary Elizabeth O'Brien 
Mildred M. O'Brien 
Timothy M. O'Brien 
Daniel Francis O'Leary 
Katherine Minetta O'Leary 
William Joseph O'Leary 
Agnes Rita O'Neill 
Christopher Joseph O'Neill 
Charles Francis Orrell 
Stella Marie Palmer 
Erwin Tyler Parkhurst 
William Joseph Pasquina 
Joseph S. Perry 
George E. Phelps 
Thomas D. Phillips 



Francis J. Polimeni 
Mabel Gertrude Port 
John Joseph Powers 
Arthur George Price 
Lawrence A. Priest 
James Joseph Punch 
Helen Josephine Quinlivan 
John J. Quinn 
Walter F. Quinn 
John H. Ramsey 
Clyde A. Rano 
Leona A. Rano 
Attilio Joseph Re 
Catherine Jane Reardon 
Joseph Louis Restighini 
Mary Lucille Riley 
Jessie M. Rinehart 
Arthur Leo Rodwell 
Margaret Dorothy Ronaii 
Ernest Harland Rowe 
Ellis H. Russell 
William Michael Ryan 
Jennie Helena Sainato 
Sophie Salinger 
Edwin Newell Sanborn 
Mary Sarkesian 
Ruth Henrietta Schelin 
Charles E. Schreiber 
Herbert Reginald Scott 
Harriet Ward-Seifen 
Edward D. Shanahan 
Morris Shapiro 
Frederick M. Sharkey 
Frank White Shepherd 
Ruth Elizabeth Sibley 
Lillian Charlotte Sigel 
Beatrice Marie Silva 
Francis Anthony Silva 
Richard James Sliney 
Nathaniel Robert Smith 
Roland G. Smith 
Mary Gloria Sousa 
William Spear 
Joseph Sanders Stymeist 
Albert W. Stynes 
Edward R. Sullivan 
James Leo Sullivan 
John J. Sullivan 
Timothy E. Sullivan 
Timothy Michael Sullivan 
William Joseph Sullivan 
Alfred E. Tadgell Jr. 
Beatrice E. Tarlson 
Arshilous Tashjian 
Marguerite Agues Tashjian 
Sarah C. Tashjian 
Gregory M. Testa 
Mabel Irene Torode 
Thomas John Torode 
Richard C. Tosi 



1>48 



ANNUAL REI'UIITS. 



Leo A. Traverse 
Elmer Edward Turner 
Grace Marie Underbill 
Florence Lillia Underwood 
Marie Ruth Yagnati 
R. Alice Van Ummersen 
Marie Carmela Veneri 
Rose Margaret Vitiello 
Grace Mildred Vroom 
Elizabeth M. Wagner 
Feme Howell Wakeman 
William Francis Walsh 



James Francis Ward Jr. 
E. Fae Warren 
Caroline Ethel Whelan 
Helen Mary Whelan 
Harold Clarence AMiite 
Richard Joseph White 
Edward Carroll Whitney 
Mildred Frances Willard 
Robert James Willwerth 
Clarissa Cecilia Wilson 
John Leslie Wood 
Anthony M. Zambernardi 
Mary G. L. Zermani 



Western 



Naida Atliol Adam 

Lillian Drew Adams 

Ruth Irene Allen 

Christina Margaret Anderson 

Mae Watson Anderson 

Sven Osten Anderson 

Maud Esther Attridge 

Cleon E. Babcock 

John Louis Bacigalupo 

Louise Frances Bailey 

Frances Mary Baker 

Howard Atward Baker 

Enzo Baldi 

Edward M. Ball 

Edna Bearte Barr 

Mildred E. Barrett 

Paul Hernon Beauchemin 

Francis John Bigley 

Ethel Louise Bignotti 

Elmer A. Birdsall 

Marian M. Blake 

Kuth Revena B. Blake 

Eleanor E. Bliss 

Frances M. Bonney 

Hazel Adelyn Boss 

Thelma E. Bowlby 

Tlobert McColloch Boyden 

Herbert Elmei- Brack 

Hose E. Brackett 

Marion Frances Brennan 

M. Gladys Brown 

Henry Michael Bruni 

Jane M. Buchan 

Flmer W. Bunipus 

William Vincent Burns 

Evelyn Thelma Burt 

Allen Kenneth Butterfield 

Beatrice A. Cademartori 

Cornelius Cahalane 

John C. Calhoun 

Margaret Jane Campbell 

Camillias Frederick Capodanno 



James J. Carney 

Edna Madeline Casey 

Arthur V Cavagnaro 

Muriel L. Caverno 

Howard Amos Chase 

William Francis Chisholm 

Carmelita Doris Chiuccarello 

Elizabeth Hurlbut Church 

F. Roselyn Chute 

Frederick Albert Clark 

Lewis J. Clark 

Thomas J. Clark 

Helen Elizabeth Clement 

Evelyn M. Coates 

Eleanor A. Colburn 

Helen Irene Colby 

Eunice Barbara Collupy 

Daniel J. A. Coughlin 

Alice Gwendolyn Coulson 

Joseph J. Coveney 

Audrey Cox 

Richard H. Cox 

Charles H. Cragin 

Forrest E. Crawford 

Thomas D. Crockett 

Catherine Frances Cronin 

Elizabeth Pettit Crook 

Marjorie C. Cullington 

Evelj'n Cummings 

H. Lyle Cunningham 

Margaret Elizabeth Curran 

Dorothea E. Cutting 

Prentiss Floyd Davis 

Preston Clyde Davis 

M. Louise Deacon 

John Howard Derby. Jr. 

Lawrence H. Devine 

Walter Robert Dewar 

Lesina Di Blasio 

Edwin Frank Dillaby 

Mary C. Dillon 

Rav Charles Dion T 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



249 



Thelma Viola Dodge 
Maude Dohertj' 
Nora E. Doncaster 
Isabelle M. E. Down 
Charlotte Helena Downey 
Evelyn M. Downing 
Hazel Kathleen Downs 
Pearl 0. Doyle 
Alwilda I. Drury 
Raymond Arnold Dube 
Leona C. Dunham 
Dorothy P. Dunn 
Martha Doris Dunn 
Marie Antoinette Dussault 
Ellsworth Bryant Easton 
Edna May Elder 
Stella R. Ellis 
Harriet Adams Emery 
Muriel Parker Eyster 
Orland Parnham 
Herbert H. Farr 
T-Kiura May Farrow 
Cleo B. Faulkingham 
Rafford Locheart Faulkner 
John Ferri 
Julia Ferris 
Mildred Langille Fife 
Arnold Douglass Finley 
Richard Cuddy Finn 
Angelene L. FitzPatrick 
Albert E. Fleming 
Lillian C. Fontana 
Gladys F. .Foster 
Marie Gertrude Fowlow 
Electa Copithorne Fudge 
Bertha Irene Fullerton 
Chester LeRov Gardner 
Philip C. Gibson 
Herbert Lyle Gilbert 
Mar^erite Irene Gillis 
Howard A. Girard 
Julian Merrill Glidden 
Priscilla F. Gabron 
Samuel B. Goldberg 
Anna Anahid Goolkasian 
Edith Lucy Gould 
Lawrence Eugene Grant 
William R. Grant 
Phyllis Marie Gray 
Norman Eldredge Greene 
Harold Francis Greenough 
Beatrice Ella Griffin 
Ruth H. Grout 
William W. Hallahan 
Catherine V. Hanley 
Helen Elizabeth Hardy 
Richard James Hassett 
Eugene Hawes 
Doris Olive Hlldred 
Lois Meserve Honnors 



Mar.iorie A. Hopkins 
Edna May Howard 
Martha Ellen Howard 
Alan George Howes 
Elizabeth B. Hunt 
Margaret MacKenzie Hurd 
Ernest Armstrong Hussar Jr. 
Ruth Wheeler Hutchins 
Genevieve May Ingalls 
Hazel Mae Innes 
Ruth L. Jackson 
Evelyn Beatrice Jardlne 
Patrick John Jodice 
Albert Joseph Johnson 
Charlotte Marie Johnson 
Ebba L. Johnson 
Esther K. Johnson 
Florence Gertrude Johnson 
Howard W. Johnson 
Lillian Leona Johnson 
Rudolph J. 0. Johnson 
Ruth E. Johnson 
Annabelle Johnston 
Richard Joyce 
Elmer Blake Jule 
Ruth Woodard Keator 
Helen Kathleen Kelley 
Ruth Marian Kelley 
Lillian J. Kelly 
Lucy Lorraine Kelly 
Alberta Mae Kelson 
Louise N. Killory 
Harriet Anne Krauth 
Mary Ellen Lally 
Augustus J. Lamborghini 
Helen Bertha Lang 
Mary LaRocca 
H. Alice Lavers 
Constance R. Leal 
Caroll Donald Lehane 
Stephen John Leveroni 
Dorothy H. Lewis 
Horace Osborne Lewis 
John C Linehan 
Roy W. Linfield 
Mabel Robertson Locke 
Emma Adaline Macdonald 
Frances Anne Macdonald 
Joseph A. Macdonald 
Edna Bleak] ie Macfarlane 
Irene Isabelle MacGillivray 
Marie Dervin Maclntyre 
Florence Martin MacLean 
James P. MacLelland 
Sidney A. MacSween 
Burt Angel Macy 
Beatrice A. Malatesta 
George S. Mann 
Marian Marshall 
Alexander Martin 



250 



AXXTAl, KKl'Oirrs. 



Alphonso Martin 

Marie Deloris Martin 

Joseph L. Marvin 

Walter D. McAfee 

Eleanor M. McAuliffe 

Mary A. McCarthy 

William F. McCarthy Jr. 

Edward Malcome McGray 

William J. McKeoNA^n 

Frank Allen McLain 

Emory Allan McLean 

Arthnr Alexander McLennan 

Dorothy M. McMenimen 

Francis C. McNamara 

Gertrude Martha McNamara 

Kathryn McNamara 

Marguerite J. McNamara 

Mary Levinia McNamara 

Anna Gertrude McSweeney 

Mary Agnes McSweeney 

Rora T. Melville 

Bena C. Membrino 

Margaret Elizabeth Merritt 

David G. Miller 

Lewis Jesse Mitchell 

Eleanor Mitrano 

Dorothea Catherine Monahan 

Ruth C. Moore 

M. Frances Morris 

Helen Rita Murley 

Ruth Davida Murray 

Frances Naugler 

Erik John Nelson 

Madeline Edwards Newcombe 

Mae Eleanor Newell 

Ruth L. Nicklas 

Jason Eastman Nourse 

John Gerad O'Brien 

Harold Franklin Ordway 

Kenneth J. Osborn 

Mabel E. Page 

Myra Frances Page 

Queenie Takoohy Pambookjian 

Doris Alfa Pearson 

James Allen Peoples 

Florence Evelyn Perry 

Frances Elizabeth Phillips 

James Ralph Pierce 

Alice Marie Powers 

Anna M. Powlishack 

Lorna Margaret Proudfoot 

Janet Hunter Putnam 

Esther Catherine Quinn 

Charles F. Ransom 

William Joseph Reagan 

G. Norman Ream ore 

John W. Reardon Jr. 

Eleanor M. Reed 

Elizabeth S. Reed 

Ida Grace Reid 



Mary E. Reilly 
Louis Gannett Richards 
Ruth Richardson 
Eleanor Robinson 
Esther Christine Rose 
Eleanor M. Ross 
Philip E. Rundlett 
Arthur Odell Sanborn 
Donald B. Sanborn 
Margaret Mary Saunders 
William P. Saunders 
George R. Sawin Jr. 
Charlotte W. Sawyer 
Helena Athea Schneider 
Horace E. Seaman 
Gertrude L. Searle 
Harry B. Seymour 
Irving Shapiro 
George A. Sheldon 
Katherine R. Sheridan 
William Henry Shirley 
Edward William Skaling 
Edward Henry Skuse 
Dorothy E. Smith 
Ralph A. Smith 
Seretha Ellen Smith 
Anthony E. Sousa 
Constance H. Springer 
Frank Leslie Springer 
Russell Colesworthy Squires 
Laura E. Steed 
Robert Leslie Stephens 
Meriel Louretta Stickney 
Evelyn M. Stratton 
Helen Emily Strehlis 
Grace Ludlow Stowell 
James Ellsworth Sumner 
Thomas A. Sweeney 
(Gertrude H. Tainter 
Howard Neilson Tait 
William J. Talbot Jr. 
Robert Edwards Thomas 
Evelyn Kean Thorburn 
Evelyn Irene Thorne 
Fred Ernest Tibbetts 
Edward L. Traver Jr. 
Mildred Frances Treible 
Robert Llewelyn Tribe 
Henry Earl Trotta 
Harold C. Urlwin 
Helen Louise Walker 
Alice G. Warren 
Frances Holmes Waugh 
Ronald Isador Weiss 
Florence A. Wentworth 
Marguerite C. Wentworth 
Medora Elizabeth Wheaton 
Vera H. Whitney 
Esther Margaret Whittaker 
Julia E. Williams 



.SCHOOTv DEPARTMENT. 251 

Isaiah Wilson Ernest Richard Yates 

N. Kenneth Wilson Geraldine Frances York 

Celia Elizabeth Winne Areleen Elizabeth Yoston 

Dexter L. Wise Emmett K. Zink Jr. 

Marjorie Louise Worthylake Estelle W. Zwicker 

TABLE 27— VOCATIONAL SCHOOL GRADUATES 

Vocational School for Boys 

Andrew DelVecchio Everett Herbert Home 

Rinaldo Dilorio Stillman Henry Maguire 

Charles Malcom Doty George William Smith 

David Arthur Hill Stannard Burbank Sylvia 

Table 28 — Organization of School Board, 1925 

School Committee 

Harry M. Stoodley Chairman 

John J. Hayes Vice-Chairman 

Members 

EX-OFFICIIS 

John M. Webster, Mayor 76 Boston street 

JoH-N S. Smitij. Jr., President Board of Aldermen, 52 Sydney street 

WABD ONE 

John J. Hayes, 10 Wisconsin avenue 

Fbancis J. FiTZPATBiCK, 2 Austin street 

WARD TWO 

Chbistopheb J. MuLDOON, 88 Concord avenue 

Daniel H. Bradley, 19 Concord avenue 

WARD thbee 

Chables W. Boyeb, 66 Avon street 

Oscar W. Codding, - .59 Vinal avenue 

WABD FOUE 

Walter E. Whittaker, 135 Walnut street 

Katherine C. Coveney, 73 Marshall street 

WARD five 

Habby M. Stoodley, 283 Highland avenue 

Minnie S. Turner, 64 Hudson street 

WABD SIX 

Walteb Fbye Tl^neb, 15 Highland road 

Walter I. Chapman, ...... 18-A Central street 

WARD SEVEN 

Edwin A. Shaw, 63 College avenue 

Herbert Cholerton, 94 College avenue 

Superintendent of Schools 
Charles S. Clabk 

OflBce: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's ofl&ce will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His oflBce hour is 4 o'clock on school days, 
and 8.30 on Saturdays. 



252 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Superintenrtent's office force: 
Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 
Mildred A. Merrill. 26 Cambria street. 
Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln place. 
Marion E. Marshall, HO Oilman street. 
Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Highland avenue. 
S. Regina Truelson, 38 Rogers avenue. 
Bernice F, Parker, 11 Dickson street. 



January 5 
January 26 
February 16 
March 30 



Board Meetings 

April 27 
May 25 
June 29 
September 2S 
8.15 o'clock. 



October 26 
November 30 
December 28 



Standing Committees 
Note. — The member first named is chairman. 



District I. — Hayes, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon. 

PRESCOTT. ITANSCOM. BENNETT 

District II. — Muldoon, Bradley. Fitzpatrick. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER 

District III. — Boyer, Codding, Bradley. 

POPE, CL'MMINGS 

District IV. — Whittaker, Coveney. Boyer. 

EDGERLY, GLINES 

District V. — Stood ley. Miss Turner, Whittaker. 

FOHSTEH. BINiillAM 

District VI. — Turner, Chapman, Stoodley. 

(ARK. MORSE. PROCTOR, DURETX, BURNS, IJKOWN 

District VII. — Shaw, Cholerton, Turner. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER. LINCOLN, LOWE 

High Schools — Shaw, Bradley. Hayes, Codding. Whittaker, Stoodley, 
Chapman. 

School Accommodations — Hayes, Boyer, Bradley, Coveney, Miss Turn- 
er, Turner, Cholerton, Mayor Webster, President Smith. 

Teachers — Cholerton, Miss Turner, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Codding, 
Whittaker, Chapman. 

Finance — Codding, Stoodley, Fitzpatrick, Bradley, Whittaker, Turner, 
Cholerton, Mayor Webster, President Smith. 

Text Books and Courses of Study — Chapman, Muldoon, Hayes, Cod- 
ding, Coveney, Miss Turner, Shaw. 

Industrial Education — Boyer, Turner, Hayes, Muldoon. Coveney, Miss 
Turner, Shaw. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics — Fitzpatrick, Whittaker, 
Bradley, Boyer, Stoodley, Chapman, Cholerton. 

Rules ami Regulations — Muldoon, Coveney, Fitzpatrick, Boyer. Stood- 
lev. Turner. Shaw. 



SCHOOL DEl'ARTMBNT. 



S06 



TABLE 29— TEACHERS IN SERVICE, JANUARY, 1925 

Name and Residence 

HIGH SCHOOL 



Laurence 
Arthur N. 
Fred W. 
Wallace .'■' 
Irving P. 
Albert O. 
George E,. 
Foirest S. 
\j. Thomas 
Francis J. 



Central Hill 



John A. Avery, Head Master, 15.') Summer Street 

Everett W. Tuttle, Vice-Head Master, 62 Highland Avenue 

Frank H. Wilkins. Master, 73 F'oster Street, Arlington 

John L. Hay ward, Master, 242 School Street 

Marry F. Seai-s, Master, 44 Orris Street, Melrose Hlds. 

William W .Obear, Master, 10 Greenville Street 

George M. Hosmer, 31 Adams Street 

A. Sprague, 17 Perkins Street, West Newton 
S'maJl, 11 Pembroke Street 
Carrier, 14 Lloyd Street, Winchester 
. Hall. 37 Perkins Street, West Newton 
Colman, Greenbush 

Plantinga, 12 Appleton Court, Melrose 
Pearson, 325 Highland Avenue 
Miller, s Hudson Street 
DeCelles, 46 Ware Street 
Mahoney, 16 Parker Street 
Helen L. FoUansbee, 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Harriet E. Tuell. 17 Pleasant Avenue 
Elizabeth Campbell. 39 Greenville Street 
A. Laura Batt, 2 Madison Street 
M. Helen Teele, 11 Jason Street, Arlington 
Blanche S. Bradford, 163 Summer Street 
Grace E. W. Sprague. 888 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
Mrs. Lucy I. Topliff, 220 Walnut Street, Brookline 
Ella D. Gray. 147 Walnut Street 
Grace Gatchell, 67 Boston Street 

A. Marguerite Browne, 10 Chauncey Street, Cambridge 
Esthei- Parmenter. 16 Mystic Lake Drive, Arlington 
Annie C. Woodw^ard, 144 School Street 
Alice A. Todd, S2 Munroe Street 
Ella W. Bowker, 2 Hillside Avenue 

Florence L. McAllister, 23 Wallace Street "^ 

Laura R. Cunningham. 62 Highland Avenue 
Julia A. Haley. 88 Prospect Street 
Mary C. Smith, 117 Prospect Street 
Gladys L. Swallow. 15 Pleasant Avenue 
Alfreda Veazie, 193 Linden Street, Everett 
Mrs. Phebe E. Mathews. 159 Morrison Avenue 
Mrs. Ruth L. Card. 75 Brook Street, Wellesley 
Ilene C. Ritchie, 15 Willoughby Street 
Ella W. Burnham. 58 Walnut Street 
Mrs. Cornelia D. Pratt, 11 2- A Glenwood Road 
Bernice O. Xewborg. 12 Hale Avenue, Medford 
IjOui{-\pi\ M. Saunders. 391 Broadway 
(jertrude W. ChafRn. 10 Copeland Terrace. Maiden 

Welch, 3 Washington Avenue, Arlington Hgts. 
Bell, 62 Highland Avenue 
Harvey. 19 Wisconsin Avenue 
Margery Moore, 58 Walnut Street 
Mrs. Edith M. Hudson, 67 Bristol Road 
Harriet C. Whitaker, 75 Walnut Street 
Ruth C. MacDuffie. 30 ^Vadsworth Street, Allston 
Arrington. 37 Walnut Street 
Cochi*an. 34 Hancock Street. Medford 
1. Fury. 9 Cleveland Street 
Lyle. 25 Low^den Avenue 
Solano. 1135 Commonwealth Avenue, Allston 
Phebe R. Boole. 21 Sacramento Street, Cambridge 
Ruby F. Sutherland. 218 Highland Avenue 
Helen B. Ryan. 35 Columbus Avenue 
Sophia C. Mague. 1766 Washington Street, Auburndale 



Elizabeth M 
Harriet M. 
Dorothy E. 



Ruth E. 
Margaret 
Elizabeth 
Sadie M. 
Carmen 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


$4100 


1895 


; 2950 


1S95 


2700 


1906 


2550 


1913 


2700 


1901 


2775 


1906 


2500 


1901 


2550 


1906 


2500 


1916 


2500 


1915 


2100 


1919 


2100 


1915 


2100 


1918 


2550 


1914 


2100 


1920 


1900 


1919 


2300 


1919 


2150 


1900 


1900 


1899 


1900 


1902 


1900 


1895 


1975 


1895 


1750 


1903 


1900 


190S 


1750 


1914 


1800 


1901 


1825 


1906 


1900 


1908 


1725 


1911 


1800 


1906 


1750 


1913 


1750 


1911 


1750 


1913 


1750 


1914 


1700 


1913 


1750 


1916 


1750 


1916 


1750 


1916 


1825 


1916 


1800 


1913 


1825 


1912 


1825 


191? 


1800 


1919 


1725 


1918 


1750 


1919 


1750 


1916 


1825 


1919 


1750 


1904 


1750 


1920 


1650 


1920 


1750 


1920 


1750 


1921 


1600 


1921 


1650 


1921 


1650 


1921 


1650 


1921 


1600 


1921 


1700 


1922 


1750 


1922 


1675 


1922 


1750 


1918 


1825 


1921 



254 



A'^^'NUAI. RETORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

Kena S. Hezelton, 17 Preston Road 

M. Louise Hannon, 108 Thurston Street 

Elizabeth Richards, 16 Ashland Street, Medford 

E. Bella Weisman, 17-A Melvin Street 

Irene E. Kenney, ol Avon Street 

Inez M. Atwater, ;»8 Electric Avenue 

Gladys B. Hastings, 17 Pleasant Avenue 

Estelle B. Crowe, 7){i Sunset Road 

Hazel L. Smith, 15 Victoria Street 

Mrs. Helen G. Leitch, 66 Highland Avenue 

Mabell M. Hani, Clerk, 41 Boston Street 

Mildred M. Moses, Clerk. 7 Leslie Place $15 per 

♦Wesley A. Maynard, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Mrs. Minne T. W.vman, Matron. 146 Oakland Ave.. Arl. Hgts 

*■ Part tlriie 





Begun 


Salary 


Service 


1750 


1909 


1825 


1923 


1600 


.1923 


1500 


1921 


1575 


1923 


1450 


1923 


1500 


1924 


1400 


1920 


1200 


1922 


1700 


1924 


1500 


1906 


week 


1924 


840 


1918 


;. 1400 


192r{ 



XOliTHEASTEliN .JCNIOII HIGH SCHOOL 

Marshall Street 

James S. Thistle, Master. 13 Conwell Avenue 

Joseph S. Hawthorne, Vice- Principal. 233 School Street 

Arthur J. Marchant, 60 Bartlett Street 

Guy P. Carver, 16 P^airmount Avenue 

Walter VV. ^^ewcombe, 49 Tennyson Street 

John J. Malone, 71 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Benjamin Q. Belonga, 316 Lincoln Avenue, Ciiftondale 

Mrs. Mina P. Bickiord, 36 Emei-son Street, Medford 

Emma G. Blanchard, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 

Mary I. Bradish, 63 Dudley Street, Medford 

Marie Clifford, 164i! Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Mrs. Clara B. Donlon. 73 Pleasant Street, Ayer 

Lucy Dorr. 60 Oakley Road. Belmont 

Grace M. Driscoll, 25 Arthur Street 

Kathinka Fessman, 1126 Boylston Street, Boston 

Mary C. Fox. 2S Linden Street 

Florence R. Gallagher, 16 Otis Street, Medford 

Helen L. Galvin, 1111 Boylston Street, Boston 

Mrs. Amelia M. Gray, 96 Magoun Avenue, Medford 

Pertie T. Gray, 16 Maple Avenue 

Edyth M. Grimshaw, 121 West Concord Street, Boston 

Mrs. Elsie M. Guthrie, 50 Bromfield Road 

Mary A. Hickey, 21 Amaranth Avenue, Medford 

Minnie A. Holden. 9 Sanborn Avenue 

Mary L. Holway. 82 Benton Road 

Amy S. Irish, 59 Bailey Road, Watertown 

Helen C. Jackson, 645 Fellsway, Medford 

Edith L. Laycock, 23 Melvin Street 

Mrs. Elma H. Mattson, 30 Richardson Street, Brighton 

Mary F. Mead, 22 Kidder Avenue 

Elizabeth J. Mooney, 20 Pleasant Avenue 

Mary O'Donoghue, 80 Porter Road, Cambridge 

Mary E. O'Shaughnessy, 76 Derby Street 

Alice M. Patterson, 184 Pearl Street 

Katherine Quig-ley, 580 Adams Street, East Milton 

♦Katherine E. Reycroft. 32 Winttirop Street. Charlestown 

Mrs. Annie M. Rockwell, 33 Stuart Street, Everett 

Mrfe. Constance H. Scherer. 25 Falmouth Street. Belmont 

Mrs. Gladys M. Sheldon, 55 Liberty Street, Everett 

Velma B. Strout, 36 Francesca Avenue 

May B. Thompson, 645 'Fellsway, Medford 

Elizabeth M. Warren, 138 S'.vcamore Street 

Florence 'M. Wheeler, 106 Bartlett Street ; 

Olive E. WTiittier, 42 Percy Road, Lexington 

lAdela M. Balch, 223 ■ Mountain Avenue, Arlington 

Ruth Fowler, Clerk, 45 Franklin Street |15 per 

• Temporary Teacher 
t Leave of absence 



$3100 
2275 
2075 
1900 
1975 
1 800 
2075 
1600 
17O0 
1600 
1600 
1600 
1600 
1400 
1750 
1600 
1750 
1650 
1600 
1600 
1600 
1675 
1600 
1600 
1300 
1500 
1400 
1600 
1600 
1700 
1600 
1675 
1300 
1650 
1600 
1200 
1600 
1600 
1600 
1750 
1600 
1675 
1600 
1600 
1600 
wk. 



1924 
1915 
1914 
1923 
1917 
1924 
1922 
1903 
1902 
1899 
1 907 
1914 
1919 
1920 
1912 
1918 
1918 
1903 
1920 
1917 
1909 
1919 
1918 
1906 
1923 
1 923 
1923 
1913 
1918 
1905 
1904 
1911 
1.923 
1919 
1921 
1924 
1919 
1917 
1919 
1918 
1918 
1897 
1 9^4 
191-8 
1921 
1924 



S<; F F ex ) I . I ) K 1 " .\ KT M K N T . 



z;).) 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continuetl 

Name and Residence 

SOUTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Vinal Avenue 

George M. W'ad.swuitli, Master, Whitman 
Raymond K. Shepherd, Vice-Principal, 120 Central Street 
Arthur E. Gordon, lit) School Street 
Melvin T. Carver, 247 Winthrop Street, Winthrop 
Herbert H. Shallies. 28 New Hampshire Avenue 
Clara B. Sackett, 23 Robinson Street 
Mrs. Blanche G. North, 25 Columbus Avenue 
Mrs. Gertrude W. Leighton, 31 Vinal Avenue 
Grace T. Merritt, 10 Charnwood Road 
Lilla E. Mann, 35* Bui'nside Avenue 
Mrs. Mary B. Soule, 6 Aldersey Street 
Leila L. R^ind, 1S6 Bleasant Street, Arlington 
Nona E. Blackwell. 4") Ibbetson Street 

Mrs. N. Theresii Hennessey, 6.j Hawthorne Street, Lynn 
Edith 1.1. French, .'')2 Prescott Street 
Emma .T. Kennedy. ')S Walnut Street 
Maude M. Cunningham, .'>8 Walnut Street 
Carrie M. Frost, 102 Powder House Blvd. 
Charlotte A. Holmes, 24 Cambria Street 
Ada G. Macdonald. 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 
Anna J. Coll. 65 Newton Street 
F. Antoinette Pratt, 2 Champney Place, Boston 
Olive M. Brownell, 64 Vinal Avenue 
Ruth H. Conner, 13 Pleasant Avenue ' 
*Edith V. Blood. Medfield, Mass. 
Mabel H. Eddy. 6S St. Stephen Streef, Boston 
Mrs. Beulah N. Foye, 65 Hudson Street 
Eleanor D. Campbell, 169 Hig-hland Avenue 
82 Concord Avenue 
Hannon, 108 Thurston Street 
Cuj'rie. 146 Morrison Avenue 
Weston, 13 Pleasant Avenue 
120 Central Street 
S l^rosppf't Street 



Ida Paly, 
Martha H. 
Helen M. 
Evelyn E. 
Charles W. Copp, 
Anne C. Donohue. 



Alice W. Jones, 92 Tem,ple Street, West 
Lillian M. Fowler, Clerk, 87 Porter S^treet 
* I^eav^e of absence 



Roxbury 



$15 per 





Beg-an 


Salary 


Service 


$3100 


1891 


2275 


1919 


2000 


1918 


2000 


1917 


1900 


1923 


1700 


1891 


1600 


1893 


1675 


1895 


1600 


1897 


1600 


1 902 


1 600 


1902 


1675 


1906 


1600 


1906 


l&OO 


1909 


1600 


1912 


1600 


1912 


1600 


1913 


1600 


1920 


1650 


1899 


1600 


1914 


1675 


1916 


1600 


1918 


1600 


1919 


1700 


1921 


1600 


1J>21 


1700 


1922 


1400 


1922 


1400 


1922 


1300 


1922 


1650 


1 923 


1200 


1923 


1600 


1921 


1600 


1924 


1 200 


1924 


1600 


1925 


week 


1924 



W^ESTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Holland Street 

Arthur L. Doe, Master. 27 Spruce Street, Maiden 

Walter P. Sweet. Vice-Principal, 1061 Broadway 

John J. McLaug-hlin, 31 .Avon Street 

Ralph E. Earns worth. 19 Wolcott Street, Everett 

Prescott E. Whitfield, 38 Walnut Street 

Sarah E. Pray, 58 T.iiberty Avenue 

Clara B. Parkhurst. 146 Highland Avenue 

Edith F. Hersey, 266 Gray Street. Arlington 

Annie G. S'mlth, 59 Maple Street, Maiden 

Mary L. Bryant, 41 Mason Street 

Florence M, Hopkins, 288 Mass. Avenue, Arlington 

Katherine A. Bieen, 7 Cambria Street 

L. Alice Grady, 19 Billings Avenue, Medford 

Elizabeth R. Henderson. 152 Curtis Street 

Marion F. Orne, 48 Fairmount Avenue 

Mrs. Mae W. Conant, 62 Westminster Ave., Arlington Hts. 

Marcella M. Garrick. 295 Lov/ell Street 

Blanche Preston, 84 Packard Avenue 

Miriam E. Priest. 6 Hudson Street 

Mrs. Geneva C. Farnsworth, 19 Wolcott Street, Everett 



$3100 


1896 


2275 


1919 


2000 


1916 


2000 


1918 


1900 


1921 


1600 


1S77 


1600 


1889 


1675 


1899 


1600 


1901 


1600 


1903 


1600 


1907 


1650 


1912 


1650 


1912 


1600 


1912 


1700 


1912 


1600 


1917 


1600 


1917 


1600 


1917 


1600 


1917 


1600 


1917 



256 



ANNUAL RETORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 



Name and Residence 

Helen A. Moran, 483 Medford Street 
Emma M. Damon. 170 Central Street 
Catherine E. Giles. ."> Bradbury Avenue, Wellington 
Mrs. Augusta H. Berg in, 55 Kenwood Road, Boston 
il Simpson Avenue 
S7 Irving Street 

l^awton. 136 Neponset Avenue, Dorche> 
A. Maxwell. 15 Munroe Street 
Nemser. 25 AValker Sftreet 



Ellen L. Bellamv 
Ethel M. Park, 
Mrs. L-illias T. 
Mrs. Ruth 
Eleanor X 



tor 



Elizabeth A. Stolba, 7 Exeter Street, Belmont 
Veola Del^auzon. 12 Pembroke Street 
Frances E. Biller. 353 T^well Street 
Dorothy Perkins. 34 Towei- Street 
Madeline E. Flynn. 57 Franklin Street 
Carolyn E. Precious. 103 Orchard Street 
Viola M. Jackson, 107 Mollis Street, Atlantic 
Miriam Poole. 27 (~)watonna Street, Auburndale 
Marion Orout, Clerk, 4 rjlover Circle 



$15 per 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


1500 


191*) 


1600 


1908 


1675 


191>i 


1600 


1920 


1600 


1921 


1675 


1916 


1 650 


i'.n3 


1500 


1922 


120<) 


1922 


1650 


1923 


1400 


1923 


1200 


1924 


1100 


1924 


1000 


1924 


1300 


1924 


1750 


1924 


1500 


1924 


weeiv 


1924 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS (DAY) 

Davis Building, Tufts street 

Harry L. Jones, I'rincipal, 137 Powder House Boulevard 

Nehemiah E. Gillespie. 81 Worcester Street, Boston 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, 27 Sewall Street 

H. Ralph Aubin, 6 Oxford Street 

Roy R. King, 14 Landers Street 

Philip J. Heffernan. 2S2 Boston Avenue. .Medfor.l 

Benjamin C. Bow^man. IS Michigan Avenue 

Charles A. Perry, 4 Bulfinch Street, Boston 

Mrs. Ethel M. Smith. Clei-k. IS Salem St., Medford $21 pe 



$3300 


1896 


2100 


1911 


2100 


1913 


2100 


1917 


1900 


19155 


2000 


1918 


1850 


1919 


2150 


1922 


week 


1921 



INDEPENDENT HOL'SEHOLD ARTS SCHOOL 
Hi.gh School Building 
Mary Henleigh I'.rctwn, i »irect(»i-, iii2 Higliland Avenue if22(>0 



1911 



CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

Folsom lUiilding. SycanKne Street and Evergreen AvenXae 

Everett W. Ireland, Principal, 138 Powder House Blvd. 

H. Dunbar Davis. 99 Summer Street 

Kells S. Poland, 110 Brainerd Road, AUston 

Marion H. Hathaway, 162 Central Street 



$2850 


1920 


1900 


1923 


1950 


1920 


1400 


1924 



Grade 



(WILLIAM H.) I'HESCOTT SCHOOL 

Pearl and Myrtle Streets 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 12 Pleasant Avenue 
6 Asst. Edith M. Snell, 4 Vine Street, Melrose 
6 " .\nnie L. I~)impsey, Hotel Woodbridge 
6 Mary E. Richardson, 11 Austin Street 
6 Isabelle M. Gray. 25 Webster Street 
6 Doris F. Rudd. 46 Franklin Street 
5 Alice M. Dugmore. 1002 Sroadway 
5 G. Hortense Pentecost, 157 Walnut Street 

5 *Berta M. Burnett, 51 Fresh Pond Parkway, Camb. 
5 Mrs*. Myrtle T. Martin, 41 Putnam Street 



;3050 


1889 


1650 


1900 


1500 


1891 


1500 


1893 


1500 


1897 


1000 


1924 


1300 


1928 


1500 


1905 


1500 


1915 


1500 


1916 



S( ' 1 1(>( )I. I>KrARTMENT. 



i^5r 



Grade 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 
Name and lle.sidence 

Gertrude T. Donahue, 28 'Calvin Street 
Evelyn MacDonald, 50 Bromfield Road 
Kdith C. Polechio, 706 Moody Street. Waltham 
Anna A. Burns, 118 Perkins Street 
Mrs. L/Ouise S. Weare, 65 Hancock Street, Boston 
Elizabeth L. Marvin, 3S Dartmouth Street 
Eleanor W. Nolan, 14 Farrington Avenue, Allston 
Ijouise E. Pratt. 163 Summer Street 
Mrs. Grace E. Alleii, 107 Pennsylvania avenue 
Alice W. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 
Jeannette M. Hannabell, 44 Benton Road 
Mrs. Dorothea S. Daly, Lynnfield Centre 





Began 


Salary 


Service 


1000 


1924 


1000 


1924 


1500 


1922 


1100 


1923: 


1500 


1896 


1500 


1898. 


1500 


1909 


1500 


1889 


1500 


1919' 


1500 


1901 


1500 


1917 


1400 


192a 



: SANFORD HANSCOM SCHOOL 

f Webster and Rush Streets 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 49 Boston Street 

4 Mrs. Agness M. Travis, 27 Marianne Rd., Walth. 

4 Maude A. Nichols, 88 Belmont S'treet 

3 'Jennie M. Twiss, 67 Berkeley Street 

3 Frances E. Robinson, 101 Willow Avenue 

3 Mrs. Nellie \V. McPheters, 71 Mountain St., No. 

Wo burn 

2 Martha L. Littlefield, 1G3 Summer Street 

2 Florence M. Shaw, 157 Summer Street 

1 *Marion A. Viets, 122 Dale Street, Waltham 

1 Alice M. Saben, 391 Broadway 

Kdgn. Elizabeth J. Baker, 19 West Cedar St., Boston 

Asst. Mrs. Dorothy C. Huddy, Oakley Terrace, Belmont 

* Leave of absence 





1892" 


$1650 


1908 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1908 


1500 


1914 


1500 


1897 


1500 


19.09 


1500 


1912 


1500 


190» 


1400 


1907 


1250 


1921 



Grade 



Kdgn. 
Asst. 



CLARK BENNETT SCHOOL 

Poplar and Maple Streets 

John Sherburne Emei^son. Master, 3 Preston Rd. $3000 1894 

Kate B. Gifford, Russell House, Lexington 1700 1902' 

Lois P. Wilbur. 62 Highland Avenue 1550 1923 

Abbie M. Brown, 84 Pei-kins Street 1400 1923 

Bessie W. Young, 47 Mystic Lake Drive, Arlington 1400 1923 

Mrs. Katherine D. Millen. 22 Dovell Street 1500 1920 

Marie L. Wieczorek, 65 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge 1500 1922 

Sarah L. Wolfe, 121 Morrison Avenue 1200 1922 

Mrs. Cora Ti. Gowen, 1167 Bovlston Street, Boston 1500 1906- 

.'Mice M. Hayes. 9 Pembroke Street 1500 1913 

Elvira Badaracco. 1874 Beacon Street, Brookline 1200 1922 

Helen E. Harrington, 1654 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 1400 1912 

Mrs. Abigail R. Bailey. 278 Arborw^y, Jamaica Plain 900 1924 



GEORGE L. BAXTER SCHOOL 

Bolton Street 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 22 Bowdoin St., Arlington ,™,.,. I9I3 

4 Mary G. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street $1600 1900 

3 Margaret M. Breen. ^61 Somei-\'ille Avenue 1500 1916 

2 Sue A. Fitzpatrick. 451-A Somerville Avenue 1500 1912 

1 Maria D. MacLeod, 78 Larchwood Drive. Cambridge 1575 1906 

Kdgn. Eleanor A. Connor, 86 Belmont Street 1400 1903 

Asst. Margaret McCarthy, 34 Highland Avenue 1000 1922 



-258 



ANNUAL REI»ORTS 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

OREN S. KNAPP »GHOOT. 

Concord Avenue Began 

Salaiy t^ervioe 

Franciy A. llyan, Master. 22 Binvdoin St., Arlington $3000 1913 

6 Winifi-ed I. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street. Brookline 1650 1917 

6 Ellen C. Moynihan, 12 Farring-ton Avenue, Allston 1500 1919 

6 Etta R. Holden. 9 Sanborn Avenue 1500 1908 

€ Eleanor M. Lundgren, 93 Lowden Avenue 1500 1919 

5 Marguerite G. Stanton. 60 Ossipee Road 1500 1922 

5 Alice A. Tassinari. 94 Beacon Street 1500 1919 

4 Agnes C. Riley, 112 Central Street 1500 - 1918 

3 Helen F. Gallagher. 15 Naples Road, Brookline 1100 192:^ 

2 Mildred A. Dewire. 383 Washington Street 1100 1923 

1 Gertrude 1. McEachern. 14 Sanborn Avenue 1000 1923 



ALBION A. PERRY SCHOOL 
Washington Street, near Dane Street 



Francis A 
Catherine 
Mar>' A . 
Mary E. 
Grace R. 



Ryan, Master. 22 Bowdoin St.. Arlington 



E. »weeney. 48 Everett St 

Mullin. Canton 
Keefe. 44 Benton Road 

O'Neil, 347 Washington Street 
Mrs. Sarah E. Murphy. 55 Bristol Road 
Helen M. Armstrong. 104 Summer Street 



.Arlington 



$1600 
1500 
1500 
1500 
1500 
1000 



1913 
1901 
1910 
1922 
1913 
1906 
1924 



CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL 

Washington and Boston Streets 

Florence A. Chaney, Master. 49 I'oston Street 
M. Abbie Tarbett. 11 Washington Street, Stonehani 
Harriet M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street. West Medford 
?klargaret V. r>aTnb. 34 i^rescent Street 
Eva" E. Perkins. 136 Colonial Road, Brighton 
Annie G. Sheridan. 43 Highland Road 
ijzzie W. Parkhurst. 146 Highland Avenue 
Rosa J Aberle. 49 Mystic Avenue 
M. Katherine Davis, 24S-A Highland Avenue 
Florence E. Locke. 14 Katherine Road, Watertown 
Eunice S. Higgins. 25 Berkeley Street 
Josephine T^cy. 63 Cherry Street 
\lice B. Frve. 101 Summer Street. Maiden 



|;30oo 


1892 


1650 


1906 


1575 


1893 


1 500 


1922 


1.500 


1911 


1500 


1886 


1500 


IS 85 


1100 


1923 


1500 


1904 


1500 


1899 


1300 


T921 


1500 


1921 


1500 


1904 



(JOHN A.) CUMMINGS SCHOOL 

School Street, near Highland Avenue 

>^muel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., Allston 
Fannie L. Gwynne, 65 School Street 
Katherine M. Fox. 152 Franklin St., Stoneham 
Elizabeth L. Her«ey. 96 Oxford Street 
Mrs Stella M. Hadley. 11 Greene Street 





1S93 


$1600 


1886 


1500 


1896 


1500 


1896 


1500 


1914 



(JOHN G.) EDGERLY SCHOOL 

Cross and Bonaii- Streets 

Charles E. Brainard. Master, 12 Plea.sitnt Avenue ........ 

1 Martha W. Power, 37 Gleason St., West Medford $16o0 
S Mary M. Dorney, 62 Webster Street, Medford 
3 \Uce M. MoFarland. 90 Prospect Street 



1000 
1100 



1889 
1890 
1924 
1923 



Grade 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 259 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

r JACOB T.) GLINES SCHOOL 

Jacque.'; Street, near Grant Sti-eet 





Began 


Salary 


Service 




1881-> 


$1700 


189D 


1500 


189& 


1500 


19ir 


1500 


1921 


1100 


1924 


1400 


192C^ 


1500 


189t^ 


1500 


1891 


1500 


1900'. 


1400 


192G> 


1500 


191E> 


1500 


1892: 


1400 


390& 


1200 


1921 



Charles E. Brainard, Master, 12 Pleasant Avenue 

6 Margaret A. Orr, 146 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

6 Harriet F. Ward, Weymouth 

5 Alice C. Blodgett, 34 Browning Road 

5 Mrs. Monira Blodgett 84 Pearl S'treet 
5:4 *Helen M. Northrup, 12 Raymond Avenue 

4 Laura M. Flynn, 57 Franklin Street 

4 Mrs. Carrie Armitage, 57 Madison Street 

3 Florence E. Baxter, 42 Highland Avenue 

3 Cora J. Demond, 146 Massachhusetts Ave., Boston 

2 Elizabeth C. Sullivan, 74 Ossipee Road 

2 Mrs. P^lorence S. Fowler. 109 Highland Avenue 

1 Isabel J. Tifft. 109 Highland Avenue 
1. 

Kdgn. Ida M. Kane, 28 Fellsway We«t 

Asst. Marjorie Gustin, 3 Virginia Street 

* Leave of absence 



(CHARLES) FOUSTER SCHOOL 

Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue 
Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street 
a Annie S. Gage, 32 Marshall Street 
6 Elizabeth F. Clement, 29 Kidder Avenue 
4 Hazel C. Wellington, 71 Oxford Street 
3 Carrie T. Lincoln, 65 Ashland Street, Medford 
3:2 Ethel H. Werner, 20 Laurel Street, Arlington 
2 Lilllian G. Wells, 61 Bonair Street 
1 Grace Shorev,- 142 Sycamore Street 
1 



(NORMAN W.) BINGHAM SCHOOL 

Lowell Street, near Vernon Street 

Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street $3000 189«.> 

6 Elizabeth .T. O'Neil. 82 Benton Road 1650 1894 

6 Anna G'. Molloy, 82 Benton Road 1500 1921 

6:5 Margaret Callahan, 165 Lowell Street 1000 1924 

5 Clara L. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 1500 1902 

5 Helen F. Wiseman, 43 Highland Ave., Cambridge 1500 1922 

4 Anna R. Canfleld, 205 Cedar Street 1500 1914 

4 Alice A. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street 1500 1920 

4, 3 Barbara E. Drummey, 43 Short Street, Marlboro 1500 1918 

3 Lillian F. Commins, 6 Cvpress Street, Cambridge 1500 1914 

3 Lvnda V. Merrill, 26 Brastow Avenue 1500 1912 

2 Ruth A. Oilman, 63 Berkelev Street 1500 1923 

2 M. Gertrude McCarthv. 36 Brastow Avenue 1500 191T 

2, 1 Ethel F. Rudd, 46-A Franklin Street 1300 1921 

1 Mabel E. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 1500 1894 

1 Frances E. Fisher, 176 Williams Avenue, East Lynn 1500 1921 

Kdgn. Marguerite Driscoll, 396 Medford Street 1300 1921 

Asst. Marv B. White, 109 Highland Avenue 1200 1921 





1890 


$1650 


1881 


1500 


1884 


1000 


1924 


1500 


1892 


1500 


1919 


1000 


1924 


1500 


1892 



2m 



AXNT'AT. REPORTS. 



Grade 



TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

MAllTIX W. CAKR SCHOOL 



Atherton Street 



Ter 



Salary- 
AUston $3100 



Saniut'l A. Johnsitn. Master. '> Gardnei 

Eva S'. Bent. 10 Steeve.s Circle 1650 

Gi-ace McElhiney, 32 Minot Avenue, Brockton 1500 

Dorothv L. Luiidgren. J'S T.oAvden Avenue 1500 
Mrs. Hazel F. Quinn. 21 Hamilton St., Wollaston 1500 

Lillian E. Haskell. 41 I'utnam Street 1500 

Elizabeth S. Foster. 53 Laurel Street 1500 

i-.Mrs. Blanche (J. CroAvell, S6 Partridge Avenue 1200 

Alice M. Cummin?-, 117 School Street 1500 

Helen Hession. 1S4 North Street 1000 

Margaret ^l. Brennan. 30 School Street 1500 

Bessie 1. Berry. 3S Wyllis Avenue, Everett 1500 

Annie B. Russell. 14 Kidder Avenue 1500 

Marv E. Flanlev. !' .\von Street. Wakefield 1500 

Frances E. Welch. 303 Highland Avenue 1500 

Mabel R. Ingham. fi2 Central Street 1500 



Began 
Service 

1893 
1915 
1925 
1915 
1915 
1913 
1895 
1924 
1917 
1924 
1917 
191=^ 
1901 
1915 
190S 
1912 



t Temporary Teacher 



6:( 



(ENOCH R.) MORSE SCHOOL 

.Summer and Craigie Street 

Frank ^V. Seabury. Master. IS Winslow Avenue 
:Mrs. Harriette C. Hamilton, 36 Meacham Road 
Lennie W. Bartiett. 49 Laurel Street 
Blanche E. Thompson. 53 Laurel Street 



Mrs. Sarah K. Lake. 1!)9 Prospect Street, Cambridge 
4:3 Eva A. Wilson. 153 Lowell Street 
3 Mrs. Agnes C. Rice. 34 Highland Avenue 
2 Edna M. Scriven. lOS Sunnner Street 
2 Lena Munroe, 211-A Summer S'treet 
1 Mrs. Helen T. Smith. 43 Paulina Street 
1 *Alena M. Shea, 6 HoUon Street. Med ford 
Kdgn. Gertrude Prichard. 5 AVebster Street 

Asst. Esther 1). Hamilton, 42 Francsca Avenue 

* Temporar>' Teachei' 



$3100 


1911 


1650 


1900 


1500 


1893 


1575 


1906 


1500 


1921 


1500 


1917 


1500 


1900 


1200 


1922 


1500 


1913 


1500 


1912 


1000 


1925 


1400 


1920 


oon 


1924 



GEORGE (). i'Ktx'ToR SCHOOL 

Hudson Street 

Harrv F. Hathawav. Master. 2^' Albion Street 1S90 

€ Nora F. Bvard. 27 College Avenue 1650 18S4 

6 Alice G. Hosmer. 42 Boston Street 1500 1906 

-5 Mrs. Nettie L. Fav. 15 Pleasant Avenue ' 1500 1901 

-5:4 Eliza I. Patterson, 65 Hudson S'treet 1500 1919 

4 Ethel F. Moiang. Ls Curtis Avenue 1500 1920 

3 Edith L. Hunnewell. 41 Mason Sti'eet 1500 1894 

2 Mary S. Richardson. 347 Boston Avenue. Medford 1500 1906 

J Luc-ia Aluei-. It!?. Sunnner Street 1500 1889 



GEOKGI-] W. DI'RELL SCHOOL 

Pea con and Kent Streets 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 5 Gardner Ter., AUston 
Abigail !'. Hazelton, 28 Whitfield Road 
<;race E. I'ackard. 14 Winslow Road. Belmont 
Mary Winslow, 124 Oxford Street, Cambridge 
Alice M. Itjckei-. ^2 .Mai-ioii Street. East P.oston 





1893 


1600 


1902 


1 500 


1912 


1500 


1887 


1 50(1 


1912 



;3050 


1908 


1650 


1911 


1500 


1906 


1400 


1924 


1500 


1913 


1300 


1925 


1500 


1923 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1900 


1000 


1924 


1500 


1914 



SCiroOL DKI'AHTMENT. 261 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — Continued 

Name and Residence 

MARK F. BURNS SCHOOL 

Cheri'V F'treet, near Highland Avenue Began 

Salary Service 

F<>ank W. Seaburv, Master, IS Winslow Avenue 1911 

4 Mrs. Margaret D. Quarrie. 21 Bay State Avenue 1650 1909 

4 Lizzie E. Hill. 121 St. Stephen Street. Boston 1500 1890 
3 Annie L. Brown, 4 Saginaw Avenue. N. Cambridge 1500 1885 

3 Margaret Beattie. 401 Washington Street 1500 1914 
2 Marv E. Lacy. 63 Cherry Street 1500 1890 

2 Ardelle Abbott, 71 Craigie Street 1500 1896 
1 Alice E. Morang-, 18 Curtis Avenue 1500 1893 

1 Ruth E. Andrews. 21 College Avenue 1500 1917 

BENJAMIN G. BROWN SCHOOL 

Willow Avenue and Josephine Avenue 

Georg-e I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. Med $3050 
6 Mary- T. Ford, 3 Goodwin PL, Boston 

5 Annie Sanburn. 11 East Newton St., Boston 

5 Ruth Brown. 84 Perkins Street 

4 Anna N. Johnson, 33 Everett Avenue 

4 *Mildred S. Flint, 103 Orchard Street 

3 Pauline Thiesfeldt, 159 Mystic St., Arlington 

3 Alice M. Dorman, 159 Morrison Avenue 

2 Mrs. Grace H. Bliss, 33 Whitfield Road 
2:1 Valborg- Preljensen, 43 Sacramento Street, Cambridg^e 1000 

1 Olivia H. Norcross, Wilmington 

* Temporary Teacher 

HIGHLAND SCHOOL 
Highland Avenue and Grove Street 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 

6 Grace M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, W. Medford 
6 Margaret McLeod, 14 Ware Street 
6 Eva M. Barrows, 1 Glover Circle 
6:5 *Marion Allen, 74 Collins Street, Danvers 

5 Catherine A. Burden, 50 College Avenue 
5 Hazel M. Stone. 915 Broadway 

5 Carrie E. Crockett, 889 Broadway 

* Leave of Absence 

S. NEWTON CUTLER SCHOOL 
Powder House Boulevard, near Raymond Avenue 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 

6 Bernice J. Andrews, 10 Locke St., No. Cambridge 
6 Mrs. Minnie R, Lougee, 631 High St., West Medford 1500 
6 Ella H. Bucknam, 36 Curtis Avenue 
6 Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, 163 Summer Street 
5 Alice Parlin, 79 Everett St., Arlington 
5 Bessie J. Baker, 19 Mills Street, Maiden 
5 Alice A. Libbey, 20 Chandler Street 
5 Eugenia Carver, 65 Hudson Street 

4 Mrs. Elva A. Cutler, 36 Powder House Boulevard 
4 Mrs. M. Eunice Byrne, 37 Sunset Road 
4 Wilma S. Bryant, 11 Burnham Street 

3 Hortense F. Small. 91 Electric Avenue 
3 E. Mildred Milner, 66 Hall Avenue 
3 Mrs. Nettie M. Humiston, 43 Fairmount Avenue 

2 Almena J. Mansir. 77 Albion Street 
2 Stella Bucknam, 35 Curtis Avenue 
2 Gladys G. Stone, 41 Marshall Street 
1 Annie H. Hall, 36 Curtis Avenue 
1 Mary L. McKenna, 294 Lowell Street 
1 Eleanor E. Waldron, 135 Powder House Boulevard 

Kdgn. Mrs. Dorothea G. Lamb, 90 Curtis Street 

Asst. Hilda Fole^^ 141 Bowdom St., Dorchester 





1897 


1650 


1893 


1500 


1923 


1500 


1903 


1500 


1911 


1500 


1902 


1500 


1919 


1500 


1923 



;300o 


1897 


1650 


1914 


1500 


1922 


1500 


1897 


1500 


1893 


1200 


1923 


1500 


1905 


1500 


1919 


1500 


1922 


1500 


1911 


1500 


1912 


1400 


1925 


1500 


1912 


1500 


1920 


1500 


1920 


1500 


1899 


1400 


1917 


1000 


1924 


1500 


1906 


1500 


1915 


1400 


1919 


1400 


1921 


900 


1923 



2(>2 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — ^Continued 

Name and Residence 

LINCOLN SCHOOL 

ilroadway near Teele Square Began 

Grade Salary Service 

HLarlaii V. Knight, :^[aster. 22 Hamilton Road 1897 

3 Eliza H. Lunt, 248 Highland Avenue 1600 1889 
i Mrs. Lillian M. Wentworth, 248 Highland Avenue 1500 1911 

2 Ulevia M. Woods, 22 Chetwvnd Road 1575 190S 
1 

MARTHA PER 11 V LOWE SCHOOL 
Morriso]! A\ enue near Grove Sti'eet 

George 1. Bpwden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. Med 1908 

4 May E. Small. 104 Orchard S'treet 1650 1900 
4 Stella M. Holland, 34 Francesca Avenue 1500 190S 

3 Maude C. Valentine, 1098 Broadway 1500 1901 
3 Mrs. Jane M. Taaffe, 159 Morrison Avenue 1500 1888 
2 Katherine E. Hourahan, 94 College Avenue 1500 1892 
2 Clara G. Hegan, 100 School Street 1500 1897 
1 Octavia A. Stewart, 15 Kenwood Street 1500 1917 
1 Selena G. Wilson, Jl Irving Street 1400 1922 

EVENING SCHOOL PKINCIPALS' 

Everett W. Tuttle, High $7.00 

Francis A. Ryan, Hell and Cliff 6.00 

CADETS 

Lillian Andrews, 18 Walnut Road 
Mona Burke, 278 Lowell 5^'treet 
Eleanor B. Casey, 28 Bartlett Street 
George K. Coyne, ■)9 Preston iioad 
Dorothea Crosby. 34 Rush Street 
I'auline D. Dodge, 222 Highland Avenue 
Ruth M. Drew, 42 Mt. Vernon Street 
Mary L. Han-ington, 1 Carver Street 
Alice Frances Morgan, 71 Park Street 
Gladys M. Wellington, 71 Oxford Street 
Catherine Wiggins, 61 Webster Avenue 
Helen Wilson, 66 Highland Road 

SUPERVISORS' AND SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Music 

I 
12, 7 James P. McVey, 14 ^V'endell Street, Cambridge $2500 1915 

6, 1 Mrs. Charlotte D. Lawton. 121 St. Stephen St., Boston 1975 1898 

Drawing 
6, 1 Clara M. Gale, 21 WMlloughby Street 1975 1911 

Sewing- 
Mary H. Brown, Supervisor, 162 Highland Avenue *200 1913 
6, 5 Marv L. Bovd, 18 Fen wick Street 1500 1888 
6. r, Mrs. Emma J. Ellis, 1G3 Summer h/treet 1500 1900 

Penmanship 
9, 1 Ruth L. Whitehouse. 21 College Avenue 1700 1915 



$600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 


600 


1924 



SCIUMH. |)p:i'AUr.MKNT. '2^y.j 

TABLE 29 — Teachers in Service, January, 1925 — ('oiicludt'd 

Xaiiu' and Residence Began 

Salary Service 
Manual Training 

Harr>- L. Jones. Supervisor, 137 Powder House Blvd. I-On 1911 

lMi>sical instruction 

12, UErnetit Hermann, The Warren. Wash. St.. Newton $1550 1914 

12, 7 Arthur R. Aver, 11 Penwick Street 2500 1921 

12, 1 Marg-aret V. Burke. 1 Pearl Street 12W) 1923 

12, 1 M. Helen Campbell, 22 Barton Street 1200 1923 

Atypical 

Marv A. Holt, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1550 1910 

Mrs. Bertha M. Morton, 62 Highland Avenue 1550 1913 

Julia M. Riordan, 165 Albion Street 1600 1914 

Mildred M. Harkins. 22 Traymore St.. Cambridge 1200 1923 

Sight .Saving 
Mrs. Amy F. W<X)dbuiy. 83 Pearson Road 1600 1917 

* additional to salary as Director of Household --^ts Courses 
t Additional to salary as Principal ot Boys' Vocational School 

t Part time 



TABLE 30— OFFICERS, ETC., IN SERVICE JANUARY 1925 

Name and Residence 

SLTPERINTENDJSNT AND SECRETARY 

Salary 
Charles S. Clark, 75 Munroe Street $5000 

Clerks 

Mary A. Clark. 42 Highland Avenue 1500 

Mildred A. Merrill. 26 Cambria h'treet 1350 

Ruth O. Elliott, 4 Lincoln Place $23 per wk 

Marion E. Marshall, 30 Oilman Street $21 per wk 

Beatrice M. Hersom, 62 Hig-hland Avenue $19 per wk 

Regina Truelson, 3S Rogers Avenue $15 per wk 

Attendance Officer . 

Benjamin R. Jones, 25 Loring Street 2000 

Bemice F. Parker, Clerk, 11 Dickson Street $17.50 per wk 



2G4: 



ANNUAL RErORTS. 



TABLE 31— SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1925 











Weekly- 


School 


Name 


Residence 


Salary 


High School, 


assistant 


Jeremiah M. Brennan 


44 Radcliffe Rd. 


$28.50 


High School, 


assistant 


John N. Quirk 


202 Somerville Ave. 


27.50 


High School, 


assistant 


Joseph McCormack 


206 Washington 9t. 


27.50 


High School, 


assistant 


Charles Hoyt 


60 Vernon St. 


32.50 


High School. 


assistant 


Thomas G. Pullen 


6 Madison St. 


27.50 


Prescott 




James J. Quirk 


216-B Medford St. 


30.00 


Prescott 




Thomas E. Dickinson 


5 Berkeley St. 


31.00 


Hanscom 




Prank C. Mailis 


79 Flint St. 


29.00 


l:5oys' Vocational 


Charles B. Kelley 


25 Clark St. 


28.50 


Bennett 




Michael Mullaney 


7 Greene St. 


30.50 


Baxter 




Jeremiah Sullivan 


60 Newton St. 


26.50 


Knapp 




Maurice T. Mull ins 


13 Fremont Ave. 


31.00 


Perry 




Dan'l E. Cunningham 


15 Leland St. 


26.50 


Pope 




John J. Kilty 


671 Somerville Ave. 


30.50 


Southern Junior High 


William Meskill 


30 Warren Ave. 


32.50 


Southern Junior High 


Nicholas J. Lacey 


327 Washington St. 


32.50 


Cummings 




Lewis G. Keene 


92 School St. 


24.5ft 


Edgerly 




Charles P. Horton 


26 Everett Ave. 


30.50 


Glines 


, 


Roy C. Burckes 


20 Jaques St. 


30.50 


Forster 




George W. Coombs 


196 Central St. 


30.00 


Continuation 




Michael A. Mullin 


16 Bowdoin St. 


30.00 


Bingham 




John F. O'Brien 


335 Lowell St. 


33.50 


Carr 




John H. Lane 


5- A Belmont St. 


36.50 


Moi-se 




John W. Cremen 


69 Oxford St. 


31.00 


Proctor 




Vincent J. Burke 


9 Homer Sq. 


28.00 


Durell 




Ellsworth C. Lundgren 


93 Lowden Ave. 


24.50 


Bums 




Charles J. Elkins 


14 Holyoke Road 


28.00 


Brown 




James J. Cooper 


105 Willow Ave. 


29.00 


Highland 




Michael J. McKenna 


215 Washington St. 


28.00 


Hodgkins 




Patrick A. Delmore 


11 Atherton St. 


30.00 


Western Junior High 


James T. Eddy 


34 Wallace St. 


36.50 


Western Junior High 


George A. Givan 


17 Henry Ave. 


32.50 


Cutler 




Daniel T. Campbell 


22 Barton S»t. 


30.50 


Cutler 




Walter F. Burns 


23 Avon St. . 


27.50 


I-,incoln 




John T. Morey 


1 Weston Ave. 


24.50 


Lowe 




Frank H. Flagg 


22 Clyde St. 


28.00 



PIRE DEPARTMENT. 



265 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF HRE DEPARTMENT 



Somerville, Mass., January 21, 1925. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, 

Gentlemen : In compliance with the City Ordinance, I 
have the honor of submitting, for your information, the annual 
report of the fire department for the year ending December 
31, 1924. 



Alarms and Losses 



Number of bell alarms . 

Number of still alarms 
Total alarms 
Number in excess of 1923 
Value of buildings at risk 
Insurance on buildings 
Damage to buildings 
Vdlue of contents 
Insurance on contents 
Damage to contents . 
Total value at risk . 
Total damage 
Approximate per capita loss 



Classification of Causes of Alarms 



Dump 

Bonfires 

Out of town 

Grass 

Unnecessary 

Chimnej^ 

Automobiles 

False 

Children playing with matches 

Rubbish in cellar . 

Careless smoker 

Spark on shingle roof 

Set by boys 

Leaves and Christmas trees . 

Hot ashes in wooden receptacles 

Miscellaneous .... 



326 




880 




1,206 


139 


$3,498,000 


00 


3,695,603 


00 


128,702 


97 


379,219 


65 


288,340 


00 


94,285 


19 


3,877,219 


65 


222,988 


16 


2 


20 


217 




143 




101 




80 




76 




65 




53. 




42 




37 




37 




34 




32 




26 




20 




20 




223 





1,206 



266 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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o 



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72 


S^bfcHcsoocj 



VIRE DEPARTMENT. 267 



Manual Force 

The luaiiiuil force consists of one himdred and nineteen 
(119) permanent men: dnring the year one has been retired 
and placed on the pension list and one has resigned ; three 
men have been added from the eligible list of the Civil Service. 
The roster of the department is as follows, — 

1 Chief Engineer, 

1 Deputy Ctiief, 

2 District Chiefs, 
7 Captains, 

1 Master Mechanic, 
11 Lieutenants, 
* 2 Enginemen, 
94 Permanent men. 

Apparatus 

1 Motor driven, 1,300 gallon "Metropolite" pumper and hose 
wagon, 

1 Motor driven, 900 gallon pumper and hose wagon, 

2 Motor driven, 750 gallon pumpers and hose wagons, 
1 Tractor drawn, 800 gallon steam fire engine, 

5 Motor driven. Combination hose and chemical wagons, 

1 Motor driven, Combination ladder truck and chemical, 

2 Motor driven. Tiller steering ladder trucks, 
1 Automobile, Chief's car, 

1 Automobile, Deputy Chief's car, 
, 1 Automobile, District Chief's car, 
1 Automobile, Master Mechanic's car, 

1 Motor driven, Combination hose and chemical wagon, in re- 
serve, 
1 Motor driven, Ladder truck, in reserve. 



Hose 

The amount of serviceable hose is 9,800 feet of two and one- 
half (2^/^) inch double jacket, rubber lined, water hose and 
2,150 feet of three quarter inch chemical hose. There has 
been 1,000 feet of new two and one-half inch purchased and 
750 feet condemned. Owing to the unusual number of alarms 
and the increased use of hose, much more will have to be re- 
tired in the coming year, so that at least 2,000 feet of new hose 
must be purchased in order that the necessary equipment be 
kept up; 



J68 



ANNUAL RKrORTS 



Brief Resume 

The loss by fire during the month of February was more 
than one tliird of tlie year's total. The lossevS, by months^ 
wei'e as follow>s : — 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$25,533 

81,886 

13,198 

13,662 

3,128 

7,141 

14,208 

10,916 

14,522 

4,691 

16,476 

17,622 



80 
19 
15 
29 
00 
61 
85 
73 
10 
17 
88 
39 



$222,988 16 



Bonfires Etc. False alarms, bonfires and grass tires have 
called the department 291 times, these malicious calls can 
and should be reduced; the making a plaything of the appara- 
tus of the department, for the amusement of potential crimi- 
nals, should be followed up and stopped; the calls of the 
department are increasing materially each year, the legitimate 
wear and tear on men and material is very considerable with- 
out adding to it by unnecessary calls. 



The Clarendon Hill dump has called the depart- 
times during the year requiring the services of a 



Durni). 
ment 185 

company of men and the laj'ing of a total of 79,000 feet of 
hose. The fire department should not be used for the extin- 
guishment of dump fires excepting in a very few instances 
where there appears to be a povssible danger to neighboring 
property. The absence of Engine Company 6 from its station, 
fighting dump smoke and fire, is a very serious menace to 
that community which ma^' require its prompt and needed 
service at a monent's notice. 

Fire Prevention Bureau. Owing to the many fires due to 
accumulations of rubbish, in cellars and about premises, it 
was deemed necessary to employ a system of inspection. On 
MaA' 15th. such a bureau was established consisting of five 
members of the department, Lieutenant Horace W. Hutchins 
Jr. officer in charge, Charles J, Markey, Engine 2, Robert L. 
Powei-s, Engine 3, William J. Mahoney, Ladder 2, and Albert 
J. McMahon, Ladder 3. During the past seven months this 
bureau has made 1,936 original inspections and approximately 
1.500 following inspections: There were 840 cases reported 



VIKK DHrARTMRNT. 269 

for corrections covering every known violation of the Regu- 
lations of the Department of Public Safety governing the 
Metro])olitan District of which Somerville is a part. Owing 
to the conscientious and thorough work of this ftre prevention 
bureau the cellar fires have been reduced to a minimum, I 
desire to commend the bureau members for their faithful per 
forma nee of this duty and for their voluntary Uvse of much of 
their off-time thereby contributing largely to the success of this 
branch of the fire service. 



Recommendations 

As in previous years, i reconuuend the erection of a new 
tire station in the vicinity of Davis Square for the housing of 
Engine 4 and its tender together with Ladder 2 thereby 
bringing it nearer to that part of the city which it must 
cover. The present Engine 4 station was erected more than 
fifty 3^ears ago and is pa^st serving the purpose for which it 
is needed besides occupying a very valuable corner on High- 
land Avenue which could be used for business purposes. 

With the replacement of Ladder 2 with a new motor 
tiller operated truck and the reconditioning of Hose 5 com- 
bination wagon the ecpiipment is fully motorized. T recom- 
mend the replacement of the tractor-drawn steam lire engine, 
at the Central Station, with a 1,000 gallon pumper; this 
steam tire engine is now being used only at multiple alarms, 
the running it to first alarms has proven to be expensive 
owing to the frequent breaking of tractor parts, further- 
more, the expense of maintaining steam at all times, the 
employment of men with special licenses to operate and two 
drivers kept in quarters could be obviated and thereby release 
two men on each platoon for fire service. 

In Conclusion 

In concluding this report, I wish to express to His 
Honor the Mayor and to the Board of Aldermen my sincere 
appreciation and thanks for their cooperation and confidence. 

I commend the officers and mend)ers of the de])artment 
for their efforts and cooperation in the performance of their 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sewall M. Rich, 

Chief Engineer. 



270 ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF UCENSING COMMISSION 



January 23, 1925. 

To the Honorable the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
Citj' of Somerville: — • 

Gentlemen : 

Tlie Licensing Commivssion respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing report for the year 1924. The commission has con- 
tinued its duties in the consideration and granting of the 
so-called Lord's Day licenses for the sale of ice cream, con- 
fectionery, soda water and fruit, and has endeavored to use 
its best judgment in the granting of these licenses for the good 
of the cit}' and the convenience of the general public. At 
present there are about two hundred places of business operat- 
ing under the Lord's Day license which is approximately one 
to every five hundred of population. 

The number of applications for licenses for one and tw^o 
car garages has increased somewhat during the year. Early 
in the year the commission purchased an atlas of the cit}' for 
its use in locating the abutters to locations from which appli- 
cations have been received for garage licensas, and notifying 
them of the time and place of hearings on same, 

The commission lias received the hearty cooperation of 
the several city departments ccmnected with its operations and 
the support and assistance of his honor the Mayor and mem- 
bers of the Board of Aldermen. 

Licenses were granted and fees paid over to the City 
Treasurer, as follows : 



LICENSE COMMISSION. 



271 



431 Garage licenses @ $2. 
249 Lord's Day licenses @ $5. . 
7 Lord's Day transfers @ 50c 



Total 



Attest : 

R. A. Keyes^ 
Secretary, 



. $ 862 

1,245 

3 


00 
00 
50 


. $2,110 


50 



Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene M. Carman_, 
Wm. H. Smith^ 
Wm. J. Shanahan_, 

Licensing Commission. 



l»72 



AXNl'AL UKl'ORTS 



REPORT OF THE 
SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURERS 



Office of Sealer of AVeights and Measures, 

City Hall, Somerville. January 1, 1925. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

The following report of the sealer of weights and meas- 
urers fo]- the year 1924 is respectfully submitted: — 



Work of Weights and Measures Department for 1924 











Non- 


Con- 




Adjusted 


Sealed 


Sealed 


demned 


Platform over 5000 capacity 


— 


48 


— 


— 


Platform under 5000 capacity . 


1 


344 


4 


2 


Counter ..... 


12 


629 


12 


4 


Spring 


14 


574 


8 


41 


Computing 


6 


390 


14 


1 


Slot Personal Weighing 


— 


61 


— 


2 


Prescription 


— 


51 


— 


— 


Beam ...... 


— 


38 


1 


— 


Weights 










Avoirdupois 


45 


3352 




1 


Apothecary 


— 


588 


— 


103 


Metric . . . 


— 


83 


— 


8 


Capacity Measures 










Dray 


— 


39 


— 


2 


Liquid 




— 


829 


— 


66 


Gasoline Pumps 




1 


148 


— 


— 


Oil Pumps 




1 


126 


54 


3 


Molasses Pumps 




— 


28 


1 


— 


Yard Sticks . 




— 


163 


— 


7 


Wood Baskets 




— 


56 


— 


6 


Cloth Measuring 


Devices . 


— 


1 


— 


— 



Total 



92 



'548 



94 



246 



SKAI.KR OF WKI(;H'1'S AND :M KASIJKKS. 



273 




Weights, Measures and Scales Condemned 



Tills j)li()t()«ii-apli r('])V('seiits l)etw(^(M» tivi* and six Iniu- 
dred articU^s of weij^lit and measure wliicli, dnrin^ the past 
two years, have been taken from stoi-es an<l pedlers and con- 
demned because of their inaccuracy. 

Fe<'s coHectcMl and paid to City Treasure!-, ii!>*701.(i'>. 

Amonnl ])aid Citv Treasin-er for PcMliers' Licc^nses, 
11,240.00. 



274 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Total nurnber of licensee issued, 312. 



Inspections other than sealing: 

Number of scales and measures in stores . 
Number of Pedlers' scales . 
Number of Junk scales . . . . 
Number of Ice scales . . . . . 
Number of Gasoline devices 

Condemned for repairs or replacement on road: 
Number of scales inspected and tagged . 
Number repaired or replaced and sealed . 
Number not reported ready for sealing . 

Condemned for repairs or replacement at office: 
Number of scales inspected and tagged . 
Number repaired or replaced and sealed . 
Number not reported readj^ for sealing . 

Number of complaints attended to: 



160 
191 

25 
106 

70 



58 
34 
24 



60 
35 
25 



Gasoline Station Tests: 

Total number of calls ...... 

Number of different stations .... 

Number of call backs to stations previously in 
spected ........ 

Total number of gallons of gas drawn for tests 
Average gallons of gas drawn per pump . 
Total number of pumps inspected ... 
Number of pumps sealed ..... 

Number of pumps closed . . . < . 
Total number of oil pumps ..... 

Number of oil pumps sealed .... 

Numberof oil pumps non-sealed 



138 

78 

60 

6700 

39 V^ 

168 

152 

16 

145 

94 

51 



('(nisidcM-ahlc time is required in testing gasoline devices, 
wlnMlier tlie device is sealed or in finding out the inaccuracy 
of it. 



Summary of tests and inspections: 





Total 










Number 


Correct 


Under 


Over 


Loaves of Bread . 


138 


57 


22 


59 


Packages of Butter 


68 


55 


8 


5 


Coal in paper bags 


77 


40 


15 


22 


Coke in paper bags 


7 


7 


— 


— 


Confectionery 


8 


8 


— 


— ■ 


Dry Commodity 


576 


347 


204 


25 


Bags of Flour 


32 


21 


7 


4 


Fruits and Vegetables . 


120 


53 


66 


1 


Grain and Feed 


4 


— 


4 


— 


Ice . 


5 


1 


3 


1 


Meats and Provisions 


37 


22 


6 


9 



Total 



1072 



611 



335 



126 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 275 

Other inspections: 



Clinical Thermometers . 


373 


Marking of Bread . 


54 


Pedlers' Licenses 


23 


Pedlers' Scales 


11 


Ice Cream Cartons 


841 


Cartons approved as measures 


681 



Arraugemeuts are being made for testing Taxicab Meters 
which is an important necessity and will be increasingly so. 
A conrse of a mile will be laid out and marked Avith brass 
plates set in the sidewalk at intervals of one-qnarter, one- 
third, one-half, two-thirds, three-quarters and one mile. Re- 
sults are ligured on each company's rates per initial charge 
and rate per fractional part of a mile. Also tests by time on 
waiting periods. 

A new set of Glass Graduates are being ordered to test 
those used in drug stores, which is also an important feature 
of this department. 

It was found on reweighing packages, in stores put u]3 
ready for sale, a number of them were deficient in weight 
owing to having been put up for some time and due to shrink- 
age. In a few cases, weighing was left to boys. The matter 
was brought to* the attention of the store managers w^lio read- 
ily had it rectified. 

A case of shortage in weight on bags of coal was traced 
to a fault in a small platform scale. The case was taken 
up with the dealer, who reweighed and made adjustment with- 
out further controversy. 

Unfortunately the public in general do not realize that 
this department is ready and willing at all times to cooper- 
ate in regard to short w^eight or measure. The average house- 
wife would rather stop trading in a store she thinks is cheat- 
ing her than go as witness in a court case, therefore this de- 
partment doesn't get in touch with as many cases as it should. 
If they would realize that it would be a means of checking this 
and a saving to those that have to make every penny count, 
perhaps we could get more cooperation. 



2T(> ANNUAL RErORTS 

It is the policy of tliis department to give the storekeeper 
the chance to remedy the various deficiencies before court ac- 
tion is taken as it has been found that a more cooperative feel- 
ing is established and the storekeepers are anxious to do what 
is right. 

It is not to be inferred that this department, in following 
this policy, is too lenient, but due allowance is made as the 
case warrants. 

B. S. Abbott, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



WATER DErARTMENT. 277 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 



SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX CO, MASSACHUSETTS 

Settled, when part of Charlestown, 1630 

(Home of Colonial Governor John Winthrop) 

Incorporated a town, 1842 

Established a city, 1872 



Location: Somerville City Hall (near centre of the city) is 2% miles 
northerly from State House, in Boston. 

Greatest extent of the City north and south about 4.2 miles. 
Greatest extent of the City east and west about 2.1 miles. 
Elevation Highland avenue at City Hall 105 feet above mean low 
water. 

Lowest building elevation in the city 13 feet 

Highest building elevation in the city 145 feet 

Area of city, including land and water, about 4.22 square miles 

Land, 2,461.50 acres; water and marsh, 238.50 acres 

Population, 1920 census, 93.033 

Present population, estimated, 100,000 

Entire population on line of pipe and supplied with water 



Water works owned by City of Somerville 

Construction commenced in 1868 

Source of supply: Metropolitan system, taking water of the Nashua 

river at Clinton, Mass. 

Range of pressure on street mains: 

Low service 35 to 65 pounds 

High service 45 to 100 pounds 



Mayor 
Hon. John M. Webster 



Water Commissioner 
Prank E. Merrill 



Office of the Water Department 
Room 10, City Hall 



Department Buildings and Yard 
Cedar street, near Broadway 



278 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ADMINISTRATION OF WATER WORKS 
VESTED AS FOLLOWS: 



1868-1871 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER COMMITTEE (5) 

Acts 1868; Chap. 202 



1872 — 1890 
SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (5) 
Acts 1871: Chap. 182 



1891 — 1897 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (3) 

Acts 1890; Chap. 218 



1898 — 1899 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS (3) 

Acts 1898; Chap. 33 



1900 — 

WATER COMMISSIONER (1) 

Acts 1899; Chap. 240 



WATER DRPARTMENT. 279 

REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER 



Ofkk'k ok tuk Water Commissioner, 

January, 1925. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of x\ldermen : — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1924, this being the fiftieth annual report of the water 
department and my twenty-fourth as water commissioner : 

Revenue and Expenditures 

Water bills have been issued as follows : — 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to . . . . $19,917 25 

"Additional" water charges, amounting to . . . 1,255 89 

"Metered" water charges, amounting to . . . . 265,081 12 



$286,254 26 
Abatements and refunds . 3,128 74 



Income from sale of water ...... $283,125 52 

Receipts; water service assessments . $8,559 72 

Receipts; labor and materials sold: — 
Misc. accounts charged . $11,412 35 

Abatements ... 724 41 10,687 94 



19,247 66 



Total income of water works . . $302,373 18 

This amount was used as follows : — 
For water works purposes : — 

Under Control of the Water Commissioner 

Water Works Maintenance . . . $69,720 13 

Water Works Extension . . . . 34,114 72 

Miscellaneous accounts: 

Maintenance . . $10,687 94 

Extension ... 894 62 11,582 56 

$115,417 41 



Not Under Control of Water Commissioner 

Metropolitan water works assessment . $142,275 86 
Maintenance water works buildings 2,983 36 



$145,259 22 



For other municipal purposes :- 



Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner 
Surplus $41,696 55 



Total $302,373 18 



280 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



In addition to the appropriations from water income to 
other municipal purposes enumerated above, water has been 
furnished Avithout charge to all the city departments that 
have required its use and it is paid for out of the income from 
eale of water. 



Department Receipts and Disbursements 
WATER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT 



Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen 

Department accounts; receipts 

Water works extension account; receipts 

Refund 

Amount expended for labor and materials for 

operation, maintenance, and renewal of 

the water works ..... 
Amount expended for materials used in ex 

tension of the water works 
Miscellaneous accounts .... 
Labor and materials furnished municipal de 

partments 

Expenditure refund 

Extension Account; amount refunded . 
Balance ....... 



$84,200 OO 

1,344 28 

26,216 07 

2 46 



$69,720 


13 


26,216 


07 


10,687 


94 


1,344 


28 


2 


46 


894 


62 


2,897 


31 



$111,762 81 $111,762 81 



WATER WORKS EXTENSION ACCOUNT 

Appropriations made by Board of Aldermen . 

Water Maintenance account: refunds . 

Amounts paid Water Maintenance Account . 894 62 

Amount expended for labor and materials 

used in extension of the water works . $34,114 72 
Balance 885 28 



$35,000 OO 
894 62. 



f35,894 62 $35,894 62 



Cost of Water Works 

The total cost of water works on December 
31, 1923, as represented by the expendi- 
tures from appropriations for water 
works extension was ..... 

Expended during the year 1924, on extension 
account 



$1,153,527 01 
$ 34,114 72 



Total expenditures, December 31, 1924 



$1,187,641 7a 



VVATKIl DEl'AKTM ENT. 



281 



Water Works Income from 1898 and its Distribution 

The water income and its distribution from 1898 to 1924, 

inclusive, is shown in tlie following table: — 

Total water income $6,562,499 2& 

Distribution: — 



Water Works Account 



Water works Construction, Renewal, 
Maintenance, Operation and Miscel- 
laneous Accounts 

Water bonds .... 

Interest ..... 

Metropolitan Water Assessments 

Maintenance Water Works buildings 



$1,764,549 82 

274,000 00 

86,575 00 

2,687,437 59 

14,755 72 



$4,827,318 13 



Other Municipal Accou^nts 

Various municipal departments through 
specific appropriations and general 
revenue account ..... 



.,735,181 12 
1,562,499 25 



Water Distribution System — ^Construction 



STREET MAINS 

Approximate number of feet of street mains in the 
city, January 1, 1924. (including hydrant 
branches and blow-offs) . 

Feet of street mains laid in 1924 . 

Feet of hydrant branches laid in 1924 . 

Feet of blow-off branches laid in 1924 . 

Feet of inter-city connection laid in 1924 

Total feet of pipe laid 
Feet of pipe removed or replaced , 

Net increase in feet of pipe . 

Total approximate feet of pipe in the city 

Total pipe mileage, approximately . 



3,969 

111 

2 

43 

4,125 

52 



551,22a 



4,0TS^ 

555,296 

105.1 



The sizes and lengths of pipe laid out and discontinued 
are as follows : 





Feet 


Feet 




Feet 


Feet 


S'ize 


Laid 


Discontinued 


Size 


Laid 


Discontinued 


%" 








Q" 


197 


32 


1" 








8" 


1,124 





2" 


165 


20 


10" 


465 





4" 








12" 


2,174 






282 



ANNUAL REi'ORXa, 



The pipes constructed and replaced during the year are 
as follows : — 



Constructed 
Boston Ave. . 
Boston Ave. (Western end) 
Broadway 
Hillsdale Road 
Irvington Road 
l#aurel Terrace 
Mystic Valley Parkway 
Talbot Ave. . 
Upland Road . 
Torktown St. . 
Inter-City Connection . ' 







Feet 


Size 






Discon- 


Discon 


Size 


Feet Laid 


tinued 


tinued 


10" 


465 






12" 


463 






2" 


122 






8" 


174 






8" 


653 


- 




6" 


94 






12" 


989 






12" 


688 






8" 


278 






2" 


23 






\ 12" 

1 8" 


34 
9 







Replaced : 

Washington Ave. . 
Hydrant Branches: 
and Blow-offs 



2" 


20 


20 


2 


6" 


103 


32 


6 


8" 


10 







4.125 



52 



Hydrants, Gates, etc. 



iNlumber of tire hydrants in city January 1, 

1924 

Number set during year 

Number removed during the year . 

Net increase in number of hydrants 

Total number of public fire hydrants . 
Number of private fire hydrants, January 1, 

1924 

Number added 

Total number of private fire hydrants 
receiving their supply from the city 
mains .....•• 



35 
23 



1,201 



12 



66 




66 



1,213 



\A' AT KR DK 1 'A BT M KNT. 

Number of gates in city, January 1, 1924 
Number set during the year for streets 
Number of section gates set . 
Number set on hydrant branches . 
Number set on blow-off branches 
Number set on car-sprinkler connections 

Number of street gates removed 
Number of section gates removed . 
Number of waterpost gates removed 
Number of blow-off gates removed , 
Number of hydrant branch gates removed 

Net increase in number of gates 

Total number of gates in city . 



Number of check-valves in city 

Number of blow-offs in city January 1, 1924 

Number added during the year 

Number discontinued .... 

Total number of blow-offs 



Number of waterposts in city January 1, 1924 
Number removed during the year . 
Total number of waterposts . 



Number of drinking fountains in city . 
Number of car-sprinkler connection in city 



13 
8 

84 
1 




2,0XS 



56 



12 





190 















44 
2,060 

8 



190 



66 
1 



65 

8 
17 



Water Services 

Number of services in city January 1, 1924 

(approximately) . . . . . 

Number laid during the year . . . . 
Number permanently discontinued . 

Net increase in services . . 

Total number of water services in city . 
Amount received for services laid in 1924 . 
Number feet service pipe in city January 1, 

1924 (city and private) approximately . 
Number of feet laid during the year 
Number of feet discontinued .... 

Increase in feet of service pipe . 

Total feet service pipe (city and private) 

(approximately) ..... 

Total service mileage (approximately) . 



14,045 



159 
15 



144 



5,333 
573 



14,189 
8,559.72 

485,240 



4,760 



490,000 
92.8 



Size, number and length of services installed in 1924: — 



l-%"-12' 
4-2"-92' 



141-%"-4754' 
l-4"-38' 



9-l"-347' 
2-6"-42' 



1-1 1^ "-48' 



284 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Number of fire services installed during 1924 

(Included in above) ..... 2 

Location of Fire Services No. Size 

Somerville Ave., No. 517; Wm. E. Cotter 

Spring Hill Garage ...... 1 6" 

South St., No. 33; Art Craft Box Co. Factory 

Building . 1 6" 



Water Meters 

Number of water meters in city, January 1, 1924 . 12,079 

Number installed during the year, new . . . 974 

Number reset ........ 118 



1,092 



Number removed on account of permanent* or tem- 
porary discontinuance of water and for substi- 
tution of other meters ...... 159 

Net increase in number of operating meters . . 933 



Size %" %" 1" IW 
No. 12566 285 105 17 

Motor and elevator registers 



Total number of meters in service .... 13,012 

Number of motor registers (included in above) . 3 

Per cent, of all services metered .... 91.6 



Operating Meters December 31, 1924 



2" 


3" 


4" 


6" 


Total 


25 


12 


8 


1 


13,009 
3 



13,012 



The meters installed in 1924 were classed as follows: — 

Applications of property owners 18 

New services .• . . . . . . . 163 

General installation . 793 

Reset . . 118 



Total 1,092 

Meters were removed for the following causes : — 

Vacancies and temporary non-use of water ... 92 

Services permanently discontinued 6 

Replaced by other meters 61 

Total 159 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



28:i 



Meters installed yearly on old and new services under the 
State Compulsory Meterage law, which requires complete 
meterage ot city by the year 1928: — 

Average installation Meters Set in excess 

of 
requirements 
344 



old 



installation 
required on 
old services 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 

411 



1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 411 

t Deficiency. 

The following 
tion of Somerville hy 
consumption : — 



Meters 
set on 
services 

755 

637 

501 

528 

423 

432 

422 

439 

434 

163 
82 

166 

115 

663 
67 

430 

811 



226 

90 
117 

12 

21 

11 

28 

23 
248t 
329t 
245t 
296t 
252 
344t 

19 
400 





Meters 


Total 


set on 


excess 


new service* 


344 


147 


570 


201 


660 


169 


777 


200 


789 


236 


810 


255 


821 


231 


849 


217 


872 


203 


624 


154 


295 


39 


50 


23 


246t 


45 


6 


60 


338t 


181 


319t 


244 


81 


163 



table shows the progress of meter install a- 
years and the results therefrom in water 



Popu- 

Tear lation 

1897 58,000 

1898 59,000 

1899 61,000 

1900 62,000 

1901 64,000 

1902 66,000 

1903 68,000 

1904 69,000 

1905 70,000 

1906 71,000 

1907 72,000 

1908 74,000 

1909 76,000 

1910 78,000 

1911 79,000 

1912 80,000 

1913 82,000 

1914 85,000 

1915 87,000 

1916 90,000 

1917 91,000 

1918 91,000 

1919 92,000 

1920 93,033 

1921 95,000 

1922 96,000 

1923 98,000 

1924 100,000 







Per Capita 


Number 


Number 




Con- 


of 


of 


Per Cent 


sump- 


Services 


Meters 


Metered 


tion 


9,601 






(Est.) 88 


9,806 


143 


1.5 


88 


10,052 


226 


2.25 


88 


10,291 


202 


2 


88 


10,520 


224 


2 


88 


10,710 


269 


2.5 


88 


10,854 


647 


6 


88 


11,059 


1,272 


11.5 


Met. 89 


11,279 


2,092 


18.5 


89 


11,489 


2,829 


24.5 


89 


11,662 


3,455 


29.5 


90 


11,817 


4,333 


36.5 


89 


12,018 


5,155 


43 


84 


12,149 


5,817 


48 


80 


12,357 


6,533 


53 


74 


12,596 


7,171 


57 


79 


12,827 


7,856 


61 


72 


13,034 


8,499 


65 


73 


13,233 


9,155 


69 


67 


13,420 


9,763 


72.75 


69 


13,509 


10,028 


74.23 


73 


13,514 


10,116 


74.86 


80 


13,544 


10,322 


76.21 


69 


13,554 


10,472 


77.26 


77 


13,631 


11,190 


82.11 


73 


13,844 


11,447 


82.68 


76 


14,045 


12,079 


86.0 


81 


14,189 


13,012 


90.6 


77 



286 



ANNUAL RftrORTS 



Summary of Pipes and Fixtures of the Water Sy»tem 

December 31, 1924 

Fee of main pipe (approximately) ..... 555,296 

Feet of service pipe (approximately) ..... 490,000 

Service connections (approximately) ..... 14,189 

Public fire hydrants 1.213 

Private fire hydrants ........ 66 

Gates 2,060 

Check Valves 8 

Meters 13,012 

Motor registers ......... 3 

Waterposts .......... 65 

Car-sprinkler connections 17 

Blow-offs 190 

Drinking fountains and troughs 8 



WATER ASSESSMENTS AND CONSUMPTION. 

The annual assessments paid bv this city as its propor- 
tionate part of the cost and operation of the Metropolitan 
water works are given below : — 

Sinking- Maturing- 
Tear Fund Maintenance Interest Bonds Total 

1898 No division made $14,250 19 

1899 " " " 20,975 58 

1900 " " " 28,689 24 

1901 $12,491 73 $12,033 79 $32,291 24 56,816 76 

1902 19,014 85 12,955 64 30,427 40 62,397 89 

1903 15,748 56 12,763 10 48,776 77 77,288 43 

1904 16,404 42 15,393 87 54,938 64 86,736 93 

1905 21,358 11 13,666 71 55,535 91 90,560 73 

1906 22,345 50 17,412 51 57,402 07 97,160 08 

1907 25.365 30 18,880 01 62,089 30 106,334 61 

1908 24,865 73 15,221 12 68,604 23 108,691 08 

1909 24,812 23 21,220 56 66,540 41 112,573 20 

1910 25,018 52 18,212 28 66,825 45 110,056 25 

1911 25,424 55 19,573 82 69,849 26 $246 66 115,094 29 

1912 24,469 82 16,111 70 68,205 16 445 46 109,232 14 

1913 24,930 94 20,691 19 70,206 83 491 92 116,320 88 

1914 14,190 98 22,488 71 73,138 81 180 63 109,999 13 

1915 14,164 65 21,376 07 74,111 12 1,129 50 110,781 34 

1916 13,249 71 21,643 98 74,058 98 1,515 62 110,468 29 

1917 13,364 71 28,110 19 75,117 17 1,833 60 118,425 67 

1918 14,193 89 29,185 04 79,975 44 2,004 18 125,358 55 

1919 13,765 81 33,723 64 78,335 58 2,257 87 128,082 90 

1920 12,559 45 37,814 68 74,903 80 2,227 81 127,505 74 

1921 11,956 69 43,942 28 75,848 98 2,241 89 133,989 84 

1922 11,119 49 37,015 40 77,490 17 2,582 78 128,207 84 

1923 10,716 17 42,846 98 82,407 74 3,193 26 139,164 15 

1924 10,620 44 42,583 87 85,035 59 .4,035 96 142,275 86 



$2,687,437 59 

Tliere has been credited to the city by the commonwealth 
as its ])roportion of the amounts received from entrance fees^ 
water supplied outside the district, and water furnished to 
water companies tlie sum of ^!)^()r)0.1(). 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



287 



Tlio daily consiimplioii of water in S()llleI•^'ille, as re- 
corded by the Ventiiri meters, operated by the Metropolitan 
water works, is shown below by months for the year 1924: — 



Gallons Gallons 

Month per day per capita 

January 7,985,600 80 

February 8,018,200 80 

March 7,487,300 75 

April 7,718,300 77 

May 7,441,000 74 

June 7,902,300 79 



Gallons Gallons 

Month per day per capita 

July 8,083,800 80 

August 7,775,200 77 

September .... 7,759,300 77 

October 7,632,500 76: 

November .... 7,582,200 75 

December .... 7,749,200 77 



The consumption for the year Avas : — 

Low-service 2,181,297,000 gallons 

High-service system 658,889,000 gallons 

Total consumption 2,840,186,000 gallons 

Average daily consumption 7,760,100 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Som- 

erville 77 gallons 

Average daily consumption per capita, for Met- 
ropolitan district 95 gallons 



The following table shows the daily per capita consump- 
tion of water in the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year 1924 as registered by the Metropolitan 
meters : 



Cit\' or town .Ian Fell ^Mar Apr May June July Aug- S'ept Oct Nov Dec Year 

Arlington .j3 53 52 52 59 62 79 63 59 62 58 59 5& 

Belmont 56 57 58 59 61 70 89 70 63 64 63 62 64 

Boston 122 118 113 107 105 106 110 109 112 110 108 115 111 

Chelsea 82 81 77 75 71 73 77 77 76 74 75 79 76. 

Everett 104 103 98 94 90 96 103 107 107 106 101 115 102: 

Lexington 50 49 51 55 58 71 94 75 65 69 68 64 Q^^ 

Maiden 49 49 49 51 49 50 62 57 59 57 54 58 54 

Medford 54 54 54 51 52 55 57 52 53 53 51 52 52: 

Melrose 64 63 61 58 61 69 75 67 66 66 65 57 64 

Milton 42 44 44 45 -14 47 51 45 46 50 52 55 47 . 

Nahant 60 55 62 77 103 194 261 278 182 107 76 57 12S; 

Quincy 78 77 76 76 79 87 94 93 89 85 74 75 82 

Revere 68 68 65 67 71 75 89 89 81 75 70 71 74 

Somerville NO 80 75 77 74 79 80 77 77 76 75 77 IT 

Stoneham 68 70 70 72 73 77 82 80 80 77 66 63 72 

Swampscott .. 67 69 62 64 77 104 137 121 102 S3 93 65 87 

Watertown .... G5 60 59 57 57 63 72 64 66 67 64 68 63 

Winthrop 47 48 49 48 49 59 74 71 60 54 50 49 55 

Met. Dist 101 99 95 91 90 93 98 96 97 95 93 98 95» 



Total 


Per Capita 


Services 


Per Day 


Per Day 


Metered 


537,000 


47 


100 


2,441,400 


53 


100 


2,859,900 


54 


99 


969,000 


55 


100 


1,395,000 


59 


100 


1,657,100 


63 


100 


887,200 


64 


100 


448,000 


64 


a9 


1,247,400 


64 


100 


600,900 


73 


100 


2,293,300 


74 


100 


3,551,700 


76 


100 


7,760,100 


77 


92 


4,352,400 


82 


91 


731,100 


87 


100 


4.491,500 


102 


80 


87,680,900 


111 


70 


195,800 


126 


76 


24.099,700 


95 





288 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The district, in order of per capita consumption, begin- 
ning with the lowest, stands as follows for the year 1924 : 



Milton 

Medford ...... 

Maiden 

Winthrop . ... 

Arlington ..... 

Watertown ..... 
Belmont ..... 

IL<exington ..... 

Melrose 

Stoneham ..... 

Revere ...... 

Chelsea ..... 

Somerville ..... 

Quincy 

Swampscott ..... 

Everett ..... 

Boston ...... 

Nahant 

Total District 

Operation — Maintenance — Construction 

Operation and maintenance of the department lias been 
Tnostlv of a routine nature. A systematic inspection and re- 
cording of all fire hydrants was made and many of the street 
gates were packed and oiled. Our transportation equipment 
has been still further strengthened and for the first time may 
be said to be in fairly satisfactory condition, although experi- 
viwe is demonstrating that our lighter type of trucks is not 
dependable for service in cold weather or in deep snow. An 
<ic(piisiti()ii of special benefit to the department is a steam 
truck, of use at all times as a carrier and of especial value in 
the winter st^ason for thawing hydrants and other water- 
works fixtures that may becouie fro/en. The body and cab 
of this outfit were built in our department shop by our own 
men who also rigged up the thawing device and converted the 
■second-liaiul touring car into a seiviceable and up-to-date 
truck. 

A laige shed has been erected in our pipe yard by the 
t)uilding department for the storage of special castings, valves 
;iind suiall parts needed in our work, and has demonstrated 
its usefulness. 

An (nent of much importance in our clerical depart- 
in en t was the return to our General Office in September after 
<in enfoiced absence of six months during the remodeling of 
City Hall. While this work was going on the department 
was t(Mnp()rarily quartered on the top floor of the recon- 
stT-nclcd portion of the bnilding. 



\V ATK K DEI 'ART .M EXT 



289 



T]h' new (luartei's, while in substantially the same lo- 
cation as the old office are more spacious, lighter and better 
adapted to carrying on the department work and all the 
clerks and the water commissioner are greatly pleased with 
the changes. 

The outstanding construction work of the year has been 
the installation of over 3,000 feet of street mains in the west- 
ern part of the city to provide water supply to new houses 
in that section : the installation of nearly 700 feet of 12" 
pijje in Talbot avenue to provide an additional feeder to the 
high-service system of the city, and the installation of nearly 
1,000 new water meters. 

An inter-city connection between the low-service sys- 
tem of Somerville and that of the city of Medford was made 
in Bostcm avenue at Mystic Valley Parkway, that niay be 
used by either city in emergencies. 

The nund)er of new service connections made Avas 80 less 
than that of the previous year. The nature of premises sup- 
plied by tlu^se services is shown in the following table: 



Apartment Houses 








2 


Battery Stations . . . . 








2 


Churches 








2 


Court House 








1 


Dwelling House 








121 


Dwelling & Store . 








- 1 


Factories ...... 








3 


Factory: Fire pipe 








1 


Garages: Private . 








10 


Garage: Public 








1 


Garage: Fire pipe . 








1 


Laundries 








2 


Lunch Room .... 








. 1 


Office Buildings 








2 


School 








1 


Stores 








5 


Tenements & Stores (Blocks) 








2 


Voting House 








1 



159 



Water Consumption 

The w\ater consumption in our city dropped to a daily 
average per capita of 77 gallons from an average of 81 gal- 
lons in the pre^'ious year. The city is now so nearly metered 
that the changes in the per capita consumption indicate with 
a fair degree of accuracy the variation in the income to the 
city from the sale of water. 



290 ANNUAL BBPORTS 

Tlie ic^cords show that this drop of four gallons a day in 
tlic \wv capita Avater consuraption wavs accompanied by a fall- 
ing off for the year of about .*'^T,000 in the income from the 
sale of water. 

This drop in water consumption and income has a sort 
of reflex action on the State's Metropolitan Water Assess- 
ment so that what is lost in water income through decreased 
cousumption may be (►ffset in the charge for water levied by 
the couimonwealth. 



Financial 

The (h^pai'tment books closed with unexi)ended balances 
on the original appropriations in both Water Maintenance and 
Water Works Extension accounts and all bills contracted dur- 
ing the year have been paid. There being no bonded debt 
there was, therefore, no water-works indebtedness of any 
kind at the end of the vear. 



Water Rate Lien Law 

(,'hapter oDl of the Acts of 1923, Mass. Legislature, en- 
titled *'An Act Eelative to Collection of Water Rates" was 
accepted by the Board of Aldermen and approved by the 
Mayor in March last. 

This Act provides that unpaid water bills may under 
certain conditions become a lien on real estate and that the 
property may be sold by the city to satisfy its claim. It does 
not, however, deprive the city of the power of the shut-off 
wrench to enforce payments from delinquents. 



Pensioners 

Two of our de]jartment j)ensioners have passed to the 
great beyond during the year and tribute is here paid to the 
names and memory of these men: 

^ Thomas Fitzpatrick, 
John Brady, 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 291 

who (lurin<^^ their long period of employment served the city 
efficiently and fiiithfully and held the esteem and respect of 
all thir associates. 

Theri^ are now seven former employees of this depart- 
ment on the payroll of pensioners. 

Conclusion 

The tables which follow are of valne for reference and 
are made a part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Merrill^ 

Water Comni iss ioner. 



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WATER DEI'ARTMENT. 299 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1924 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association, 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 

SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 

General Statistics 

Population, census 1920, 93,033; present, estimated 100,000. 
Date of construction: Commenced in 1868. 
By whom owned : City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: Water is delivered into the city's mains, under 
both high and low pressure, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Census population, 1920, 93.033. 

Population on lines of pipe, Dec. 31, 1924, 100,000. 

Population supplied, Dec. 31, 1924, 100,000. 

Total consumption for the year, 2,840,186,000 gallons. 

Average daily consumption. 7,760,100 gallons. 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 77. 

Statistics Relating to Distributing System, 1924 

MAINS 

Kind of pipe, cast iron. 

Sizes, from 4-inch and under to 20-inch. 

Laid 4,125 feet; discontinued 52 feet; net extension, 4,073 feet. 

Total now in use, 105.1 miles. 

Number of hydrants added during year (public, 12; private, 0) 12. 

Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,279. 

Number of stop gates added during year, 44. 

Number of stop gates now in use, 2,060. 

Number of blow-offs, 190. 

Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES 

Kind of pipe: Lead; lead-lined wrought iron; cement-lined 
wrought iron; cast iron. 

Sizes, one-half to eight inches. 

Extended 5,333 feet; discontinued, 573 feet. 

Total now in use 92.8 miles. 

Number of service taps added, 159; discontinued, 15; increase, 
144. 

Number how in use, 14,189. 

Number of meters added, 1,092; meters and motor registers dis- 
continued, 159; net increase, 933. 

Number now in use, 13,012. 

Percentage of services metered, 91.6. 

Percentage of water receipts from metered service, 93.2. 

Numbr of motors and elevator registers added, 0; removed, 0. 

Number now in use, 3 (included in number of meters.) 



300 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



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SI'UIOE r COM M ISSIONER. 



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REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER 



Office of the Street Commissioner^ 

City Hall, Somerville, Jniinary 1, 1925. 

To His Hoiior, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen : — I most respectfully sul)mit the forty-ninth 
annual report, containing a brief summarj-^ of the principal 
work performed by the Highway Department, by day labor 
and contract, during the year 1924 with recommendations for 
necessary additions the coming year. 

This department has charge of the consti-uction, altera- 
tion, repair, maintenance and management of ways, streets, 
sidewalks and bridges; the setting out and care of shade trees; 
the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths, elm leaf 
beetles and other pests which destroy trees; and tlie oiling 
and watering of stress. 



Highway Department Appropriations 



Highway Maintenance 

Sidewalks Maintenance 

Street Sprinkling 

Street Cleaning .... 

Suppression of Moths 

Care of Trees .... 

New Streets .... 

Permanent Pavement 

Sidewalks Construction 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing 





Appropriations 


Expenditures! 


$126,838 81 


$126,297 10 




9,600 00 


9,599 73 




40,950 00 


40,909 05 




30,600 00 


30,599 64 




5,038 75 


5,037 34 




6,075 00 


6,060 16 




36,304 60 


36,277 81 




50,017 08 


49,934 86 




10,001 91 


9,825 18 




26,475 72 


26,472 71 




$341,901 87 


$341,013 58 



The yearly maintenance of the Highway department is 
taken from the Highway Maintenance account. Credit is 
received for work performed for the other divisions of this 
department and other departments of the City. 

City officials and taxpayers everywhere are confronted 
with the problem of providing suitable pavement surfaces for 
the rapidly and heavily increasing traffic of today. Streets 
built only a few years ago to meet the needs of that time are 
inadequate. 

Somerville is reconstructing and constructing its streets 
to meet the travel of todav. 



302 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Roads and pavements of every type require repair and 
maintenance. 

Tn many cases if patching is done in time no. further 
repaiii<i may be needed for . a considerable period, while, if 
patching is neglected it may lead to the disintegration of the 
whole pavement. 

A road may be so well maintained that it is always in 
good condition. 



The slogan for good roads should be "Drain and Main- 



tain. 



1924 
Highway Maintenance 



Appropriations 
Credits 



Street Commissioner . 

Bookkeeper, Clerk. Foreman . 

Office Expenses .... 

Equipment and Repairs . 

Harnesses .... 

Tools and Machinery 

Steam rollers .... 

New Automobiles (Two) . 

Tractor, mixer and auto maintenance 

Stable expenses .... 

Hay, grain and feed . 

Shoeing and veterinary 

Fuel 

Miscellaneous .... 
Repairs to streets, gutters etc . 
Repairs subways 

Care of lanterns and traffic signs 
Snow and Ice .... 

Signs 

Care of Highway Property 
Sawing wood from dead trees 
Holidays — vacations 
Charges to other departments . 
Bills receivable .... 
Balance 



$91,975 
34,863 



00 
81 







126,838 81 


$3,300 


00 




5,123 


58 




571 


36 




2,785 


55 




1,221 


37 




2.702 


80 




397 


17 




1,898 


00 




6.710 


61 




6.587 


72 




7,495 


08 




1,908 


08 




359 


22 




601 


22 




16,268 


30 




607 


52 




4,699 


24 




9,872 


84 




1,508 


66 




878 


49 




776 


91 




7,788 


32 




21,447 


59 




20.787 


47 




541 


71 


$126,838 81 



Snow and Ice 
Under the new State law in regard to snow, this city 



is to keep open for travel. Mystic avenue and Middlesex ave- 
nue. State highways, within its boundary. 

This year another piece of motor apparatus was pur- 
chased and a (lood Roads plow has been attached to the same. 
I most respectfully recommend the purchase of a five ton 
tractor with a Sargent plow. 



SI' H K K'V ( '( ) .M M I S S I () N H K . 303 

All streets passed by the City Government for coasting 
were posted by this department with caution signs. On . 
dangerous streets where coasting was ]U)t allowed ''No Coast- 
ing" signs were posted. 

. Tliis dei^artment cares for the sidewalks around all pub- 
lic buildings and grounds. 

360 requests and reports were attended to. 

1 11, 397. ()2 was expended for the removal of snow and ice. 
3967 cubic yards of snow and ice were removed. 62 cubic 
yards of sand and 115 cubic yards of ashes were used in car- 
ing for icy sidewalks, streets and crossings. 

Bridges 

The bridges in our city are in good condition. This de- 
partment started painting the iron fences on the bridges and 
the ap])roaches to the same, that come under its care. They 
will be completed the coming spring. 

street Railways 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company reconstructed 
double tracks on Washington street from the Boston line to 
Tufts street ; Webster avenue from Union square to near Co- 
lumbia street; Cross street from Pearl street to Tufts street 
and Boston avenue from the Medford line to Alewife brook. 

I hope the coming year the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company will reconstruct their tracks on Somerville avenue 
from Granite street on one side and from Park street on the 
other side to Wilson square and on Broadway from Teele 
square to the Arlington line. 

Undergrou'nd Wires 

Permits were issued to the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company to open streets for the construction and enlarging 
of conduits on Curtis street from Broadway to Pairmount 
avenue ; Elm street from Willow avenue to and including 
Davis square; Holland street from Davis square to and includ- 
ing Teele square; Broadway from Teele square to the Arling- 
ton line and Davis square for the new white way. 

To the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 
on Boston avenue from Broadway to Highland road; Broad- 
way from Simpson avenue to Clarendon avenue ; Cedar street 
from Elm street to Summer street ; Chetwynd road from West 
Adams street to Curtis street; Curtis street from Broadway 
to Fair-mount avenue ; Curtis street from Chetwynd road to 
Conwell avenue; Washington street from Webster avenue to 
Parker street; West Adams street from Bailey street to Chet- 



r>04 ANNUAL REPORTS 

wyiid Toad and for pole and house connections to both com- 
panies. 

Crushed Stone 

ITS tons and 44(11 cnbic yards of crushed stone were 
purcliased from William J. McCarthy' Company at |2.25 per 
ton. -^2.80 per cubic yard, 570 tons from the Boston Trap Rock 
Company at an average of ^S2.25 per ton and 370 tons at |2.00 
per ton from Coleman Bros. All stone was delivered to the 
city yard or on tlie line of work. 

Sidewalks Maintenance 

1450 linear feet of edgestone were reset. 1181 square 
yards of brick sidewalks were relaid and 198 squai*e yards of 
gran<dithic relaid. 

Police reports ])ertaining to all kinds of defective side- 
walks are cbarfjed to this appropriation. 

(franolithic should be substituted for the old brick side- 
walks in our squares. 

- i'^9.5n9.7^> was expended for Sidewalks ^laintenance. 

Street Sprinkling 

Another tank was erected at the city yard, capacity 
10,000 gallons this will give the depar-tment a storage capacity 
of about l<i,(M)() (gallons of tar for the cold application on our 
streets. Under this ap]>ropriation the department, with its 
own employees and equipment, applied all the tar from theee 
tanks to the streets. The Barrett Company furnished the 
'''Tarvia B'- into these tanks at -^.0973 per gallon and saw that 
there was a good supply at all times. 

The American Car Sprinkler Company sprinkled and 
flushed our main streets Avhere there are car tracks for J^OoO.OO 
a month, seven days a week. 

Dust layers used during the year : — 

157.861 gallons of Tarvia B. Barrett Company. 

6.905 gallons Cambridge Gas Tar. Cambridge Gas Light Co. 
lo.l25 pounds Calcium Chloride. 

^40,909.05 was expended for Street Sprinkling. 

street Cleaning 

Allot hci- Spriiiglield ^lotor pick u]) sweei)ing machine 
was purchased. These two machines practically did all the 
cleaning by working sixteen hours a day with two shifts of 
men working eight hours each. The sweepings picked up by 
these machines were dumped on side streets and vacant lot« 
:nid were removed by teams and trucks to the dump. One 



STKKKT COM MISSIOXKU. 305 

of these machines luis beeu eqiiipjx'd with a (lood Roads plow 
for snow work. In the squares and business sections of the 
city the sweeping is done between 11 P. M. and 7 A. M. 

The scarcity of dumps is increasing the cost of this di- 
vision greatly. 

7,009 cubic yards of street sweepings were removed. 

|29,599.()4 was expended for Street Cleaning. 

Suppression of Moths 

The brown tail moths are practically exterminated in 
this city. 

This department cares for all trees both public and pri- 
vate in regard to moths. 

12,008 street trees were inspected and cared for. 

10,874 private trees were inspected and cared for. 

15,721 bushes were found moth infested. 

12,866 fences and buildings on which moths nested. 

30,895 gypsy moth nests were painted with creosote. 

42 brown tail moth nests were gathered and destroyed. 

5,436 satin moth nests were painted with creosote. 

7,361 trees were sprayed by the gasoline spraying machine to 
exterminate the different kinds of caterpillars and beetles. 

31,576 tussock moth nests were destroyed. 

15,037.34 was expended for the Suppression of Moths. 

Shade Trees 

During the year there were tw^o serious wind storms that 
destroyed many shade trees. 

The leopard moth or borer is killing some of our shade 

trees and the department intends to make a fight against this 

pest. 

46 trees were set out. 
197 trees were removed. 
339 trees were trimmed by request. 
102 tree guards and supports installed. 

10,060.16 was expended for the Care of Trees. 

Highway Construction — New Streets 

Four new streets were constructed during the year un- 
der the Betterment Act, b^^ contract, viz : — 

Setting edgestones 75c per linear foot. 

Gutter construction $3.75 per square yard. 

Construction of Macadam roadway $1.50 per square yard. 

One new street was constructed by City employees. 

The city furnishes the edgestone and asphalt binder. 

Nine new streets were accex)ted this year. 
136,277.81 was expended for New Streets. 



306 ANNUAL RErORTS 

Sidewalk Construction 

Thi^ average cost of graiiolitliio sidewalks constructed, 
including excavation and all materials, was |^3.03 per square 
yard, the abutters paving- halt the cost of construction. 

Miles of edgestone, granolithic, brick and gravel side- 
walks in the citv : — 



Edgestones 
Gravel sidewalks 
Brick sidewalks 
Granolithic sidewalks 



150.553 miles 

20.193 miles 

70.625 miles 

58.042 miles 



$9,825.18 was expended for Sidewalks Construction 



Highway Construction — Permanent Pavement 

The city has made many improvements on the main 
streets this year, by removing the old paving blocks on a 
gravel base, recutting the blocks, replacing them on a con- 
crete base, and grouting them with Portland cement. 

The contract was awarded for the construction of AVash- 
ington street at 13.25 per square yard and Webster avenue 
at 13.15 per square yard. The Cross street contract was 
awarded for $3.50 per square yard; on this street the old con- 
crete was removed and re-cut blocks were furnished by the 
city, the contractor constructing a new concrete base and 
furnishing all other materials. 

J?49.934.86 was expended for Permanent Pavement. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



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310 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing 

Six streets were recoustnicted or resurfaced this year at 
an average cost of |1.40 i)er square yard by city employees. 
These streets were scarified by the steam roller, regraded and 
re rolled. After the sub-grade was ready, egg stone was spread 
and rolled, the voids filled with nut stone and rolled to a depth 
of from five to six inches, then asphalt was sprayed upon 
the same from a truck, pea stone was then spread ilnd tolled, 
another application of asphalt and pea stone, and rolled until 
the whole roadway was solidly bonded. After these streets 
had been opened to travel for a few weeks it was swept and 
an application of asphalt was apx)lied and covere(l with 
gravel for a sealing coat. If the city could continue to carry 
on this work each year the streets would always be in fine con- 
dition. 

.f2(),472.Tl was expended for Reconstruction and Resur- 



facing. 



Miscellaneous 



175 Granolithic driveways constructed, 
119 Brick driveways constructed. 
39 Edgestones dropped for driveways. 

2 Driveways extended. 

3 Driveways discontinued. 

Driveways are constructed, discontinued, relocated or 
extended at the expense of the petitioners. 

One horse was killed on account of disability. 

The department maintains its own municipal repair shop 
for the different lines of work. 

I have attended meetings of the Public Works, Mayor 
Webster as Chairman, Public AVorks Committee and the 
Board of Aldermen for couvsultation regarding work and peti- 
tions. 

Permits 

There were during 1924:— 

142 permits issued to the Cambridge and Charlestown Gas Com- 
panies. 
Ill permits issued to cross sidewalks. 
575 permits issued to occupy streets and sidewalks. 

13 permits issued to feed horses. 

27 street sprinkling complaints and requests. 
211 notifications to other departments and corporations: 

77 accident reports. 
913 police reports. 

757 brick and granolithic sidewalks repaired. 
1310 miscellaneous reports and requests. 
130 drain layers permits. 



^TR K KT ( ' O M 31 1 S S I () \ E J : . 

889 water department openings. 

209 permits to open streets and sidewalks. 

120 danger and traffic signs erected. 
34 new signs erected. 

244 signs repainted. 

141 streets cleaned by. request. 
5249 cubic yards of sand and gravel used. 
4231 cubic yards of dirt removed. 

778 cubic yards of ashes used. 
1309 cubic yards of old macadam used. 
3977 bags of Portland cement used. 
14 cubic yards loam used. 



Recommendations 



I most respectfully recommend that the work of recut- 
ting the granite paving blocks be completed on Somerville 
avenue from Park street and (Iranite street to Wilson square; 
Broadway from Teele square to tlie Arlington line be re- 
constructed with a bituminous mixed top, using the old con- 
crete base ; On Prospect street from the Fitchburg railroad 
bridge to the Cambridge line the tar top should be stripped 
off tlie concrete base and recut granite paving blocks should 
be laid on the old base, grouted with Portland cement. 

I would be lax if I did not recommend again, a new fire 
proof garage. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to all for their sup- 
port and hearty co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Asa B. Prichard^ 

Street Commissioner. 



312 ANNUAL RBl'ORTS 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER 



Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall, Somerville, January 21, 1925. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Bojird of Aldermen:— 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the city ordinances, the 
following report of the work done and expense incuri*ed for 
the year ending December 'M, 1924. by the Engineering De- 
partment and appropriations under my charge and supervi- 
sion, including the accounts of city engineer, sewers construc- 
tion, sewers maintenance, parks maintenance, playgrounds 
maintenance, and other public works, is herewith presented : — 
the 52nd annual import — my twenty -ninth i*eport as city engi- 
neer. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

In previous reports the general work, charter require- 
ments and city ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
engineer have been fully described — he shall be consulted in 
relation to public improvements of every kind when the advice 
of a civil engineer would be of service. City Engineer is also 
Supt. of Sewers and Supt. of Parks and grounds. 



Divisions Appropriations and Credits Expenditures Balances. 

City Engineer 
Parks Maintenance 
Playgrounds Maint. 
Pk. and Playgrd. Imp. 
Sewers Maintenance . 
Sewers Construction . 
Stock Account 

* iriOO.OO transferred to Parks Maintenance 



(Expenditures in the various divisions are shown in de- 
tail in tlie City Auditor's annual i*eport.) 



$13,370 00 






$13,174 23 


$ 195 77 


13,950 00 


$2,195 


00 


16,144 19 


81 


7,050 00 


83 


63 


7,133 23 


40 


5,000 00 






4,996 05 


3 95 


25,000 00 


167 


52 


*25,167 53 


12 21 


11,301 85 


193 


99 


7,478 96 


3,446 90 




315 


00 




884 9& 



riTY ENCnXEEn. 



313: 



CITY ENGINEER DIVISION, CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDI- 
TURES, 1924 



Sewera and Storm Drains, — comprising surveys, estimates, 
profiles, lines, grades, titles, plans, assessments, all 
engineering work relating to same and supervision 

Highways, — comprising plans, estimates, titles, profiles, 
lines and grades, inspection of paving and all other 
engineering work relating to the department . 

Sidewalks, — comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, inspection, titles, costs and assessments . 

Water Works, — comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants, services for buildings, and 
other matters relating to the department . 

Parks and Playgrounds, — comprising surveys, plans, esti- 
mates, profiles, and grades, including laying out of 
parks, playgrounds, boulevard and supervision . 

Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to construction 
and laying out of grounds ..... 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings 
plans, assigning street numbers, etc. . 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties 
for building and grading ..... 

Bridges and Grade Crossings, — comprising surveys, plans 
profiles, estimates, lines and grades, etc. . 

City Survey, — comprising establishing of streets lines, 
acceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 
city map, etc. ......... 

Middlesex Registry and Land Court, — comprising copying 
of plans, and abstracts from deeds and examination 
of titles filed at East Cambridge, also tracing of street 
acceptance and sewer taking plans, filed for record . 

Private Corporations, Railway, Telephone, Electric Light 
and Gas Light Companies, — comprising grades, plans, 
profiles and office notes, locations of poles and conduits 

Setting Stone Bounds and Brass Rods, — defining street 
lines and city boundary lines . . . . . 

OflEice Work, — comprising record of all locations, indexing 
typewriting, bookkeeping, calculations, reports, and 
general draughting . 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising designs, sketches, etc. 
relating to various schemes for committees 

Holidays, Vacations and Sickness .... 

National Guard Duty .... . . 

Engineering, — General Departmental expenses (all divi- 
sions) comprising city engineer's salary, auto, tele- 
phone, car fares, and supplies . . . . . 

Total 



$1,177 0» 

1,087 08- 
310 88 

362 37 
509 68 

216 9ft 

375 16, 

363 0& 
39 00 

884 92: 

147 55^ 

126 16 
21 42 

1,365 59- 

70 67 
783 36; 

75 83; 

5,257 47 
$13,174 23 



Value of lield instrunients, tools and office instruments, 
11,500.00. 



VA4: ANNUAL RErORTS 

A number of plaus were made duriug the year for sti*eet 
acceptance and nine streets have been accepted as public high- 
ways under the betterment act. 

There are pbins for acceptance of nine ])rivate streets 
on tile in tliis ollice, that for various reasons have not been 
made public ways. 

Surveys, calculations, estimates and plans have been 
made for taking land, buildings and private property for vari- 
ous i)urp(>ses in certain sections of the city. 

A new city map, GOO feet to an inch, has been made show- 
ing streets, elevations above mean low water, etc., and 1000 
copies made for general distribution ; and a map showing pro- 
posed new AVard line has been made. 

A plan has been ujade showing a proposed widening of 
Cross Street (East.) 

The continuation of the improvement of Cross Street (be- 
tween Pearl Street and Tufts Street) has been accomplished 
by widening the roadway and narrowing the sidewalks eight- 
een inches on either side of the street, placing overhead service 
wires in underground conduits and removing old ])oles from 
the street. 

Some of the old main thoroughfares should be renum- 
bered their entire length, so as to eliminate half numbei-s and 
letters now being used : also certain streets, continuing in 
bordering cities, wliere numbers conflict. 



CITY BNGINHBR. 



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316 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Summary. — Public streets 87.10 miles (includes 1.406 
miles of City Boulevard and Park Roadways, — 2.331 miles of 
State Boulevard, — 1.596 miles State Highway) ; private streets 
14.43 miles. 

Total length of streets- in the city 101.59 miles. 

In the 1910 report, tables were published showing old 
names of certain streets as formerly known, and names of pub- 
lic Squares in the city; the names of some of these Squares 
have been clianged recently, and new Squares added. 



Length of Public Streets in Each Ward 



Ward one 
Ward two 
Ward three 
Ward four 
Ward five 
Ward six 
Ward seven 



Miles 
10.824 
9.912 
7.630 
10.026 
12.628 
13.795 
22.346 

87.161 



Total length of public street in the city 

Street "Markers" — (Stone Bounds) (Brass rods set in 
cement sidewalks.) 

There are at the present time a total of 662 bounds or 
brass rods set for defining street lines, and this work should 
be continued as much as possible each year. These bounds 
are of great convenience in establishing permanent ''Bench 
Marks" throughout the city for giving grades. 

Previous reports will show location of all street bounds 
set. 

Five new streets have been constructed, under the better- 
ment act, with a bituminous macadam wearing surface, con- 
crete gutters and granite edgestone, a total of 3,104 feet (0.589 
mile.) 

The average cost of this type of construction complete^ 
for 40 ft. width streets, was |11.58 per linear foot. 

Assessments have been levied on abutting property own- 
ers for approximately one-half of the cost of constructing these 
streets. 

Ke-cut granite block pavement has been laid on a con- 
crete base with a cement grout in sections of Washington 
Street, Webster Avenue, and Cross Street ; 12,152 square yards 
(4,187 feet in length) of this type of pavement were con- 
structed by contract. 

A section of Boston Avenue was reconstructed, laying 
Simpson Bros.' asphaltic wearing surface, a length of 960 feet 
(1,225 sq. yds.) — in conjunction with all this paving the street 
railway company also relaid approximately 5,200 ^square yards 
re-cut granite paving between rails where tracks existed. 



( ITY EXd'IXEWIt. 317 

The total leugth of permanent paved streets in the city 
amounts to 18.74 miles. 

Permanent street pavement should be extended as rapidly 
as possible, using old granite blocks, re-cut and laid on a con- 
crete base — tlie best and most economical pavement for this 
city. 

Grades were gi^•en and measurements taken for the recon- 
struction of six streets with a bituminous wearing surface, a 
length of 6,213 feet. 

In constructing the granite pavement, new bituminous 
streets and granolithic sidewalks, 7,264.7 feet (1.376 mile) of 
TiBw edgestone were set. 

TABLE OF STREET CONSTRUCTION 



* Streets paved with granite blocks 

**Streets paved with concrete . 

-f Streets paved with asphaltic top 

Streets paved with vitrified brick 

Streets paved with "Bi-co-mac" 

Streets paved with bitiilithic (patent) 

Combination pavement (concrete base with 

bituminous top) . 
t Streets macadamized (bituminous binder) 
Streets macadamized (water bound) . . 
Streets graveled or unimproved 

Total 101.59 



Square Yards 


Miles 


161,500 


7.23 


22,889 


1.34 


29,666 


1.71 


20,9.58 


1.29 


10,100 


0.77 


12,234 


0.82 


82,877 


5.58 




46.16 




21.25 




15.44 



♦Also 32.5 miles (single track) electric railway paved with granite, 

asphalt, bitulithic, etc. 
**Includes 0.42 mile state highway, 
-fincludes 1.16 miles of state highway. 
^Includes 1.406 miles of city boulevard and park roadways and 2.331 

miles of state boulevard (Metropolitan District Commission, 

Park Division.) 

There are a number of crossings in this city at intersect- 
ing public thoroughfares, where the corners should be cut back 
and the roadway widened for the safety of traffic and improve- 
ment in appearance.. 

Lines and grades were given and measurements taken for 
constructing twenty new granolithic sidewalks — 3,476 square 
yards (0.658 mile) and assessments were computed, tlie abut- 
ting property owners paying one-half the cost on nineteen side- 
walks, the remainder the entire cost. The greater part of this 
work was done at an average cost of |3.0o per square yard. 

In laying out new work, under orders passed for con- 
struction of sidewalks, etc., occasionally portions of buildings 
and fences are found to be encroaching on the sidewalk and 
on some of the old rangeways these encroachments have ex- 



318 



ANNUAL RErORTS 



kted for many years; as improvements are made, the fall 
width of sidewalk should be maintained. 

Tn sections of the city, where brick sidewalks have been 
laid many years, and must necessarily be relaid on account 
of deterioration and unevenness, granolithic should be sub- 
stituted in place of brick. 



Miles of Edgestone, Granolithic, Gravel and Brick Sidewalks in Each 

Ward 







Gravel 


Brick 


Granolithic 




Bdg'estone 


S»idewalk 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 


Ward one 


20.174 


3.463 


11.898 


5.105 


Ward two 


17.340 


6.034 


6.386 


4.240 


Ward three 


14.325 


0.906 


11.545 


1.968 


Ward four 


15.435 


1.018 


9.696 


4.527 


Ward five 


22.716 


4.307 


12.155 


6.148 


Ward six . 


25.432 


3.709 


10.613 


11.724 


Ward seven 


35.131 


0.756 


8.332 


24.330 



150.553 



20.193 



70.625 



58.042 



(Details, etc., streets and sidewalks in report of Street 
Commissionei*.) 

Plauvs have been made by tlie various companies and filed 
in the city engineer's office, showing the locations of gas mains, 
poles, tracks and conduits in this city, which have been granted 
by the board of aldermen during the year; — tlie work of plac- 
ing overhead wire in conduits, underground, and removing 
poles from the streets should be extended as rapidly as pos- 
sible. 

In tli(^ city's s(]uares overhead wires should })e placed un- 
derground, immediately, aiul practically all poles (except for 
lights) removed — on tlie main thoroughfares many of the ex- 
isting jxdes should be eliminated, at the present time, b(ung 
unnecessary. 

A special ordinance should be enacted concerning city 
ins])ection on all underground work done by private companies 
or corporations and regulati(m as to inethod of street open- 
ings. 

At the present time there are underground in the city's 
streets 19.4.') miles of telephone conduits, 15.01 miles of elec- 
tric light conduits, 4.4() miles of electric railway conduits, and 
about ll.-'iT miles of underground conduits urted for the city'vs 
wires. 

The Cambridge and Cliarlestown gas companies have re- 
spectively 05,88 and 28.27 miles of gas mains in the city's 
streets. 

For tlie immediate improvement of conditions in this 
city the highway bridges and approaches over the steam i-ail- 
roads should be rebuilt the full width of the street at Broad- 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS AND STORM DRAINS BUILT IN 1924 



LOCATION 


ITEMS OF CONSTRUCTION AND C09T 




From 


Tb 


Contractor 


j Material 
Excavated 


3 
U 


SEWER 


SUB-DR.U.N 


ROCIC 

EXCAVATION .\I.\NHi)l,RS 


1 


COST PER LINEAR FOOT 


1 £ , £ 




c 


J 


Size in inches 
Lengin in 


1 

o ■ 


Price per yard 
Averat-e Cost 


Excavation 

Pipelaying 

and Refllline 


Pipe, Cement, etc. 
including 
Sub-Drain 

Engineering 

and 

Inspection 


E 

3 


1 2 




7, 


Sewer 

Storm 
Diain 

Sub-Drain 


Average C 
per Linear 

Total 

Asses 
Co8t U 




Mystic Valley Parkway 
Mystic Valley Parkway 
Kidder Avenue 
End Sewer Built 18S9 


Easterly 

Easterly 

Near Prichard Avenue 

Enil oC Street 


James H. Fannon 
James H. Fannon 
James H. Fannon 
City — Day Labor 


Clay — Hard Pan 6'-6" 
Clay — Hard Pan 5'-G" 


10 

s 
s 

10 

s 

s 


29.2 
452.0 

453.5 

299.7 
192.0 

255.5 


4 
4 


96.5 



1G0.5 


7.5 

2.4 



$5.85 
5..S5 


2 
Combi- 
nation 

See 
Sewer 

3 

1 


$118.30 

See 
Sewer 

78.93 
77.14 


3 
23 

23 

19 

10 

7 


$1.75 

0.25 

2.25 
2.00 

1.08 


$0.25 
1 11.25 


$0.39 
0.31 

o.no 

0.3S 


$0.05 
0.03 
0.07 
0.03 


0.03 


$2.75 
0.7S 
3.43 

1.77 


$1,320.71 
352.63 
1684.62 
453.15 


$1,318.75 


$1.96 
35263 
17.62 

24.15 


Irvington Road Storm Drain 


Boston Avenue Sewer 

Perry Street Sewer 


Filling and Clay 
Sand and Marl 


S'-O" 
4'-4" 


1.667.00 
429.00 



1681.9 (0.319 Miles) Sewers and Storm Drains 



$3,414.75 $396.36 



Total length of public sewers in the city Jan. 1st. 1925 
Total length of private sewers in the city Jan. 1st, 1925 
Total length of sewers in the city Jan. 1st, 1925 
Total length of storm drains in tlie city Jan. 1st, 1925 
Total length of the city drainage system Jan. 1st. 1925 
Total length of Metropolitan sewerage system mains 
in the city 



508,342.3 feet = 96.277 m 

34.896.0 feet = 6.609 m 

543.238.3 feet = 102.S86 m 

67.452.1 feet = 12.775 m 

610.690.4 feet = 115.661 m 



les (33.516 miles separate system sewers) 



3.475 miles 



CITY KN'fJIXKKK. 319 

way, ( Xortli SoiuervilU^ ) ]*n)s])(M-t Street and Washiiigtoii! 
Street, near I^nion S(|iiare; and the steam railroad bridge 
over Washington Street (East Sonierville) reconstrneted with 
Increased head-room for ^reet traflSc, — the dangerous railroad 
grade crossing at Park Street should be abolished, as decreed 
by the courts a number of years ago. 

I respectfully refer to some of the more imi)ortant recom- 
mendations and suggestions made in reports of the city engi- 
neer for a number of years past, which are for the improvement 
of conditions in this city. 

SEWER DIVISION 

The designing and constructing of sewers, storm draiiisr, 
catch basins, house drains, etc., — maintenance of the drainage 
system and other items in this division are under the direc- 
tion, supervision and control of the city engineer. 

Sewers were petitioned for and constructed during the 
year in newly laid out streets, where real estate owners com- 
menced extensive building operations. 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

1924 

Labor (city dept.) $1,450 26 

Labor (contract) 2,538 55 

Teaming ,376 64 

Materials and Supplies 3,683 49 



Total Expendture . . . . $8,048 94 

Materials from Stock (1923) .... 315 00 



$8,363.94 

CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Constructing sewers (separate system) . . $1,773 86 

Constructing sewers (combined system) . . 1,684 62 

Constructing storm drains ..... 860 16 

Constructing catch basins ..... 2,416 88 

Constructing new manholes on old sewers . 549 45 

Cost of new work .... 
Materials for other depts. . 
Materials on hand December 31, 1924 

Total .. . . . . $8,363 94 

CREDIT 

Appropriation $7,900 00 

Balance unexpended, 1923 3,401 85 

Received from other depts 193 99 

Materials on hand January 1, 1924 . . . 315 00 



$7,284 


97 


193 


99 


884 


98 



Total $11,810 84 



Balance unexpended (over to 1925) $3,446 90 



olM) ANNUAL REPORTS 

Three new sewers were constructed during the year and 
also storm drains: a length of 1G82 feet (0.32 of a mile) of 10" 
and 8" pipe, part of the work being done by department labor, 
the remainder by contract. • (See attaclied tabular statement 
for 1924, showing itemized account of work.) 

Tlie total length of the city's drainage system is 115.661 
miles, and the entire cost of construction including catch 
basins has amounted to about .$1,389,305.00 exclusive of the 
iimount paid to the state for assessments for the construction 
of the Xorth Metropolitan sewerage system. 

The assessments for the Metropolitan sewerage system 
for the year, 1924, amounted to |102.039.9T, being the city's 
proportional cost, and the total paid the Commonwealth of 
Massaclmsetts for this state sewer amounts to Sl,916,225.03 
(1892-1924, both years inclusiye.) The total length of the 
Metropolitan sewerage system mains running through the city 
is 3.475 miles. 

There are M'ithiii the city's limits thirteen connections 
with the Xortli Metropolitan state sewerage system, also four 
outlets through the city of ^ledford. The locations of the con- 
nections of the city's mains with the state sewer are shown in 
the 1912 report, and details of construction in previous reports. 

The 1918 report contains a compiled table of Storm 
Drains constructed to 1919 showing length, cost, date of con- 
struction, district benefited, etc. 

Twenty catch basins have' been constructed in the high- 
ways during the year, making a total of 2,132 basins in the 
city for storm drainage purposes, constructed and maintained 
jis follows : — 

By the city (sewer division) : — 

Located in streets and subways ..... 1,903 basins 

Located in city boulevard ..... 33 " 

Located in parks (IS) and other city lots (12) . 30 



Total catch basins constructed and main- 
tained by the city 1,966 

By Boston & Maine Railroad Company on railroad 

locations 36 basins 

By State, located in l)Oulevards and highways . 130 



166 



Total catch basins in the city for storm 

drainage purposes ..... 2,132 

The "separate system'' sewers should be extended in the 
older sections of the city each year, as the appropriation will 
allow, and storm drains completed in certain localities as 
previously recommended : — especially in the North Somerville 
District, where the discharge is across the boundary line into 
City of ^Ie(Uor<l territory, including Morrison Avenue — High- 



C-'rrY ENMilNKER. 321 

Itiiul Koad area and tlie B. and M. railroad valley; and at 
the East Cambridge line extending from the Somerville Avenue 
s(nver and discharging into Miller's River. 

No agreement lias been reached concerning a new loca- 
tion and size of ontlet for discharging storm water into Mystic 
River, where the Consolidated Rendering Co. has placed filling 
material in the natnral drainage ontlet and along the shore 
of the river. 

Sidewalk sewers in Mossland Street should be con- 
structed immediately and sections of the old sewers in Poplar 
Street and Franklin Avenue reconstructed, — thereby reliev- 
ing the continuous blocking of house drains in these streets 
under existing conditions. 

The city's drainage system will be greatly improved when 
all the foregoing changes are made and construction work 
completed. 

Whenever the Ford Motor Co. desire to build on land lo- 
cated between Middlesex Avenue and Mystic River, where 
one of the city's principal outlets for storm water now exists, 
the city is to reconstruct said storm drain in another location 
along Middlesex Avenue and thence discharging into the river 
— -land being given for the widening of said avenue and drain 
location. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

1924 

Labor ) i $13,112 56 

V includes $167.52 for other depts. / 

Teaming j \ 10,825 52 

Equipment and supplies ..... 613 33 

Repairing property and tools . . 103 90 



Total Expenditure .... $24,655 31 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 

Maintenance of sewers, including cleaning, 

flushing, supervision, etc. (115.66 miles) . $6,783 44 
Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning, and 

flushing, supervision, etc. (1966) . 13,386 47 
Maintenance of storm water pump, Medford 

Street 294 24 

Changing line and grade and repairing catch 

basins 883 03 

Changing line and grade and repairing man- 
holes 325 22 

Repairing old sewers 719 41 

Inspection and location of house drains . . 865 14 

Equipment and supplies 252 17 

Repairs of tools and property .... 103 90 



322 ANNTAT. REPORTS 

Maintenance of sewer division yards . 807 85 

Telephone (2) 66 92 



Total Expenditure .... $24,655 31 

Labor and teaming charged other dept. . 167 52 

Transfer to Parks Maintenance Account . 500 00 



$25,155 31 



CREDIT 

Appropriation $25,000 00 

Received from other dept's (work done) . . 167 52 



$25,167 52 



Balance unexpended ... $ 12 21 

Value of tools and property on hand, maintenance of 
Sewers, |2,(H)().0O. 

A perujenent force of men, varying in number from ei<>ht 
to thirteen per week, and teams are kept continually at work 
flushin<i;, cleaning and repairing the city's drainage system, 
catch basins, etc., the expense necessarily increasing yearly 
as lengths of sewers, storm drains and catch basins are added 
to the system, and the distance increased to the dumping 
places, which ai-e fast diminishing, only two being availabU^ 
at present. 

This (juestion of scarcity of dumping places has con- 
fronted the city for some time and various schemes have been 
considered for efficient and economical methods of disposal but 
no feasible plan has been provided. 

Approximately 2,1)50 cubic 3^ards of material have been 
rcMiioved fi-om the catch basins and hauled to dumps during 
the year, at an average cost of about 14.50 per cubic 3^ard 
(|1.90 removal— 12.()0 teaming) and the average cost per mile 
for cleaning and flushing the drainage system, including catch 
basins, has amounted to about |174.00. There are about 
twenty catch basins (average) to a mile of roadway in this 
city iind the approximate cost of cleaning, flushing, and gen- 
eral maintenance per basin has been $G.80 the past year. 

An auto-truck (deaning machine for catcdi l)asins, of an 
approved design, could be used advantageously in this city 
about oiie-(piartei- time during the year — the result being 
speedier cleaning; and at other times utilized in various work 
in other divisions of the Engineering Department. 

A number of repairs have been made on some of the old 
sewers, alterations made in the outlets and overflows, and 
extra manholes built for the purpose of improving the system. 

Three hundred and six permits have been issued to li- 
censed drain layers for connecting buildings with main sewers 



CITY ENGINEER. .>!'.> 

and storm (irain«; scvciity-foui' beiii<^ for impairs, alterations 
or extensions, all of the work being done nndc^i- the snpervision 
of the city's inspector-. 

Many of- these i-epairs and alterations were made neces- 
sary by tlie growth of tree roots in the private drain pipe. 
In several cases, these private drains were relaid with iron 
pipe and lead joints, which is the type of construction recom- 
mended by this department, where drain connections have 
become stopped on account of tree roots. 

(Vrtain persons are licensed as drain layers by the city 
and are under bonds, for the purpose of laying and repairing 
these ])rivate drains: — none others are permitted to do this 
work. 

Keference to data concerning each drain connection with 
the pnblic sewer is on tile in this office, and time and expense 
could be saved by the owner, by applying directly to this de- 
partment for investigation and advice, where trouble exists. 

A nund)er of car track catch basins and underground 
conduit numholes have been connected Avitli the city's drainage 
system. 

There are to date about 17,381 private drain connections 
with the city's drainage system. 

A better system of grease traps should be installed in 
the premises of some of the larger manufacturing plants and 
rendering companies to prevent large amounts of grease and 
waste products from escaping into the city sewer mains and 
at various times has partially blocked scH-tions of sewers. 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS DIVTSIOX 

About eighty-two acres are maintained as parks and 
playgrounds and approximately a mile of city boulevard ; 72 
acres are ownc^d by the city and certain areas owned by private 
parties are turned over to the city for recreation purposes, 
also satisfactory arrangements have been made for a number 
of years wherel)y the city has the use of Tufts College play- 
fields during the summer vacation months. 

These areas when completely developed will compare 
favorably with other cities in the vicinity. 

An additional area, situated at the junction of Elm 
Street, Cherry Street and Sartwell Avenue, containing 89,760 
square feet of land has been taken by the city for Playground 
and other purposes (July 11, 1924.) 

An extra appropriation was made for the general im- 
provement of parks and playgrounds, and this should con- 
tinue each year. 



32i 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 



1924 



Plavgrounds 

$5,643 76 Labor 

246 88 

1,032 84 

185 92 

23 83 



(Paid Water 



$7,133 23 



Teaming" .... 

Equipment — Supplies 
Repairing property and tools 
Fountains and Bubblers — Maint. 

Dept.) 

Trees — Shrubs — Plants — Floral Decorations 
Flagpoles — Flags — Painting- 
Repairing roadways — trimming trees, etc. 

Total Expenditures 



Parks 

$9,194 70 

573 00 

445 34 

1,194 67 

254 82 

3,672 65 

295 95 

513 06 

$16,144 19 



Playground; 

and 
Recreation 
$1,200 00 
664 75 



1.675 00 

163 37 

27 29 



168 32 
1,178 24 

641 59 

14 50 

445 68 

262 60 

7 68 

141 96 



542 25 



$7,133 23 



CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES 



Central Hill Park (13.1 acres) . . . . 

Foss Park (formerly Broadway Park) (15.9 
acres) .... 

Broadway Parkway (1.6 acres) 

Lincoln Park (7.2) acres) . 

Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) . 

Tufts Park (4.5 acres) 

Paul Revere Park (0.02 acres) . 

Belmont Street Park (0.4 acres) 

Powder House Boulevard (0.9 mile long) 

Powder House Square Parkway (0.1 acre) 

Cemetery, Somerville Avenue (0.7 acre) . 

Somerville Field, at Alewife Brook (9.5 acres) 

Dilboy Field (formerly part of Somerville 
Field) at Alewife Brook (5.5 acres) 

Richard Trum Playground, Cedar Street and 
Broadway (4.3 acres) 

Playground, Glen Street and Oliver Street (1.0 
acre + 1.5 acres private land) . 

Playground. Kent Street and Somerville Ave- 
nue (0.8 acre) 

Playground, Poplar Street and Joy Street (0.5 
acre) ........ 

Playground. Beacon Street near Washington 
Street (0.2 acre) 

Play^ound, Fellsway East (2.5 acres private 
land ) . . . . . . . . 

Playground, corner Elm Street — Cherry Street 
— and Sartwell Avenue (2.1 acres) (New 
playground acquired 1924) . . . . 

Shaw Playground, Broadway at Western Junior 
High School (2.8 acres) (City Auditor's 
report — cost of improvement.) . 

Tufts College Land, Summer and Winter Play- 
ground (5 acres) 

Total expenditure, maintenance (81.8 acres) . 
72.1 acres city property + 9 acres private land, 
0.7 acre cemetery and 0.9 mile boulevard, and 
0.54 mile parkway roads 



Parks 


$6,096 


80 


1,489 


50 


187 


64 


1,422 


18 


2,521 


25 


1,471 


90 


110 


42 


523 


11 


1,326 


09 


133 


92 


187 


32 


277 


21 


218 


13 


22 


14 


78 


97 


77 


61 



$16,144 19 



(MTY KX(;i.\EKR. 



CREDIT 



Playgrounds 

and 
Recreation Parks 

Appropriation for Parks $13,950 00 

$7,050 00 Appropriation for Playgrounds .... 

83 63 Transfers from other accounts .... 2,195 00 



$7,133 63 $16,145 00 



$ 40 Balance unexpended .... $ 81 

The assessments for Metropolitan parks and boulevard8 
for the year 1924 amounted to |82,008.91 being the city's pro- 
portional cost and Somerville's payment to the State on ac- 
connt of the Metropolitan park system amounts to .fljl52,- 
7:M.08, January 1, 1925. 

A special state commission has reported on a route and 
estimated cost of constructing a boulevard and traffic road, 
whicli will probably pass through the easterly part of this city. 

A portion of Central Hill park area has been recon- 
structed and improved in appearance and a certain area is to 
be used for playgrounds. 

New granolithic walks and steps were constructed and 
the grounds, adjacent to the new city hall, were regraded and 
the entrance driveway reconstructed. 

At Tufts Park a comfort station was installed. 

All of the cit^^'s playtield areas have been in constant 
use throughout the year ; — special supervision was provided 
by the Welfare and Recreation Commission during the months 
of July and August especially for the children's activities, to 
make the playgrounds i:K)pular and successful ; a field-day 
featured the closing of the summer work. 

Tufts College playfield was under the citj^'s supervision 
during the summer, — ''twilight baseball" being very popular. 

At the enclosed athletic field bordering Alewife Brook, 
a permanent concrete field house should be constructed with 
all modern equipment and the remaining area graded as soon 
as possible; when completed as originally designed the city 
will own one of the best recreation fields in the vicinity. (In 
the 1910 report, plan shows proposed complete laying out.) 

The cit}' has become so densely populated (averaging 
nearly 25.000 people a square mile) that some of the larger 
park areas should be more extensively utilized for public recre- 
ation and physical training purposes; on several of the play- 
fields concrete buildings should be constructed and additional 
apparatus and shelters provided on some of the principal 
parks and playgrounds for the smaller children's pleasure, 
where a regular park employee can have the care of the same, 



SJi) ANNUAL REPORTS 

and some of tlie smaller ])laYtiji*omid areas should be enclosed 
by wire fencing for the protection of children. 

In certain localities of the city, well-lighted playgrounds, 
during the summer evenings, should be maintained for the 
young men and women working in the factories daily. 

Previous reports are respectfully referred to for sugges- 
tions and recommendations for improvement of park and play- 
ground areas. 

In connection with the departmental work, the Welfare 
and Kecreation Commission, the Playgrounds Association and 
Women's Clubs have been of great assistance in advising, di- 
recting and promoting the city's wefare. (Details, etc., in 
Commission's and Association reports.) 

(See City Auditor's report for total expenditure by city 
departments and commissions for recreation and play the past 
year.) 

APPENDED TABLE 

Annexed to this report is a table giving names of all 
streets in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and 
the total mileage: in the 1010 report, tables were published 
showing old names of certain streets as formerly known, and 
the names of public squares in the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer. 



CITY KX(;iNKKR. 



327 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 



Stre«t 



From 



Abdell Somerville ave 

Aberdeen road Cedar st. 
Aberdeen rd. ex.An&le 



Acadia pk. 

Adams 

Adelaide rd 

Adrian 

Albion pL 

Albion ct. 

Albion 

Albion 

Albion ter. 

Aldersey 

Aldrich 



.Somerville ave 
Broadway 
Somerville ave 
Marion st. 
Albion St. 
.-Vlbion St. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Albion St. 
Walnut Bt. 
L'earl st. 



iJAiewile BrkpkjMystic Val. pky 



Alfred 

Allen 

Allen ct 

Alpine 

Alpine 

Alston 

.\mes 

Appleton 

Arling'ton 

Arnold ave 

Arnold ct. 

Arthur ct. 

Arthur 

Ash ave. 

Ash ave. 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Auburn ave. 

Austin 

Autumn 

Avon 

Avon pi. 

Bailey 

Banks 

Bartlett 

Barton 

Bay State ave. 

Beach ave. 

Beacon pi. 

Beacon 

Beacon ter. 

Bean ter. 



Broadway 
.Somerville ave 
Park St. 
Cedar st. 
Alpine st. ' 
Cross St. 
Bartlett st. 
Willow ave. 
Franklin st. 
Porter st. 
Beacon st. 
bind en st. 
Broadway 
.Meacham st. 
Kast Albion st. 
Summer st. 
Central st. 
Cross St. 
P.roadway 
Broadway 
School St. 
Ci'oss St. 



To 

Southwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Westerly 
Northeasterly 
Medford st. 
Northeasterly 
.Joseph St. 
Northeasterly 
.Southeasterly 
Cedar st. 
Medford line 
Southwesterly 
Vinal ave. 
B. & L. R. R. 
.Cambridge line 
Medford line 
Charlestown st. 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Low'jU St. 
Shawmut st. 
Robinson st. 
Liberty ave. 
Lincoln st. 
Southeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Easterly 
Bonair st. 
East Albion st. 
Northeasterl.v 
Sartwell ave. 
Spring' St. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Mystic ave. 
Bonair st. 
Central st. 
B. & L. R. R. 



Public 

or 
Private. 
Pr'vate. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 



Width Length. 

in 
Feet. Public Private 



25 
40 
30 

40 
40 
20 
40 
10 
16 
40 
50 
25 
40 
40 



449 

256 
907 

579 



2,742 



50 
25 
20 
30 
40 
40-30 
40 
40 
40 
15 
10 
about 10 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
30 
40 
20 
40 
25 



100 

508 

611 

4,775 



644 

667 

688 
757 
580 
668 
452 



438 
554 



478 
741 
606 
716 
408 
1,360 



North St. 
Elm St. 
A'ernon st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Webster ave 
Beacon st. 



Cutter St. 



Beckwith circle Beacon st. 



Bedford 
Beech 
Belknap 
Bellevue ter. 
Belmont 
Belmont pi, 
Belmont sq, 
Belmont sq. 
Belmont ter. 
Benedict ave. 
Benedict 
Bennett ct. 
Bennett 
Benton road 
Berkeley 
Berwick 
BlK'elow 
Billingrhani 



AVest Adams st Public. 

Summer st. Public. 

Broadway Public. 

Hamilton road Public. 

Foskett St. Public. 

Columbia st. Private. 

._, ^'otiheasterly Private. 

E.CambridgrelineSomerville ave. Public. 

Somerville ave. Northeasterly Private. 

.Southeasterly Private. 

.Southwesterly Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Atherton st. Public. 

Hamilton road Public. 

Northeasterly Private. 

Highland ave. Public. 

Southeasterly Public. 

.Southeasterlv Public. 

N. E. & S. W. Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Benedict st. Private. 

Austin St. Public. 

Prospect St. Private. 

Bennett ct. Private. 

Hudson St. Public. 

Centra! st. Public. 

Northwesterly Prlvnte. 

Munroe st. Public. 

William St. Public. 



South St. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
.Albion St. 
.Somerville ave 
Belmont st. 
Belmont st. 
End of above 
Belmont st. 
Broadway 
T'nion st. 
Bennett st. 
Prospect St. 
Summer st. 
School St. 
Hinckley st. 
Boston st. 
Broadway 



ttMetropoMtan Park Commlsalon Boulevard. 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
about 
15 
66 
24 
16 
28.5 
30 
40 
40 
20 
40 
25 
30 
20 
15 
20 
40 
10 
to 
40 
40 
20 
50 
40 



20 



420 
639 

1,550 
382 

1,237 



6.007 



165 
323 
449 

2,192 

177 

75 

145 



585 



40 



25 



1.208 
1.360 



208 
6«S 



203 
"«7 



138 

1*66 
116 



100 



50 



160 



127 
115 
100 



151 



ISO 



200 

200 

lib 

100 
112 



90 



187 
200 



100 
400 



170 



328 



ANNUAL REI'ORTS 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



of Public and 









Public 


Width 


Length 


street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Bishop's pi. 


Glen St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 




75 


Blakeley ave. 


Fellsway east 


Cross St. 


Private, 


40 


• • ■ ■ 


6S0 


Bleachery ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Fltchburg R.R. 


Private. 


30 


• • • • 


450 


Bolton 


Oak St. 


Houghton St. 


Public. 


40 


476 




Bonair 


Cross St. 


Walnut St. 


PubUc. 


40 


1.636 




Bond 


Broadway 


Jaques st. 


Public. 


40 


655 




Bonner ave. 


Washington st. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


376 




Boston ave. 


Medford line 


Mystic river 


Public. 


60 


915 




Boston ave. 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Public. 


50 


80 




Boston ave. 


Broadway 


Highland road 


Public. 


65 


287 




Boston ave. 


Highland road 


Prichard ave. 


Public. 


50 


609 




Boston ave. 


Prichard ave. 


East to angle 
in street 


Private. 


50 





lii 


Boston ave. 


Angle in st. s'ly Kidder ave. 


Private, 


40 


, , . . 


376 


Boston ave. 


Kidder ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Public, 


40 


649 




Boston 


Washington st 


. Prosp't Hill av 


. Public. 


45 


640 




Boston 


Prosp't Hill av. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,242 




Bow 


Union sq. 


Wesley sq. 


Public. 


60 


S58 




Bow 


Wesley sq. 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


50 


570 




Bowdoin 


\Vashington st. Lincoln park 


Public. 


40 


341 




Bowers ave. 


Cottage ave. 


Elm St. 


Private. 


24 




288 


Bow St. pi. 


Bow St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 


.... 


300 


Bradford ave. 


School St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


40 




150 


Bradley 


Pearl st. 


Walter st. 


Public. 


40 


762 




Braemore road 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 


• • « • 


i 


Brastow ave. 


Lowell St. 


Porter st. 


Public, 


40 


686 


. . . . 


Bristol road 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Public, 


40 


146 


. . . . 


Broadway 


Charlest'n line 


Cross St. 


Public. 


100 


2,590 


> . . • 


Broadway 


Cross St. 


Marshall st. 


Pub. 100 to 200 


2,060 


. . . . 


Broadway 


Marshall St. 


Main st. 


Public. 


100 


1,570 




Broadway 


Main st. 


Top of hill 


Public. 


100 to 90 


1.030 


. . . . 


Broadway 


Top of hill 


Albion St. 


Public. 


90 


2,540 


, , . 


Broadway 


Albion St. 


Willow ave. 


Public. 


90 to 70 


1,030 




Broadway 


Willow ave. 


Paulina st. 


Public. 


70 


3,250 




Broadway 


Paulina st. 


Arlington line 


Public. 


65-60-65 


3,220 


, - 


Broadway pi. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


22 


, , . . 


260 


Bromfield road 


Warner st. 


Dearborn road 


Public, 


40 


1,262 




Brook 


Glen St. 


Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


504 


• • • 


Browning road 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Public, 


40 


679 




Buckingham 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


292 


• • • 


Buena Vista rd 


Holland st. 


.Southwesterly 


Private. 


35 


• • • • 


276 


Burnham 


Broadway 


Pow. House Bl 


Public. 


40 


543 




Burnside ave. 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public, 


40 


720 




Cady ave. 


Simpson ave. 


AV. side Corin 


■■ 












thian road 


Public. 


40 


1.5S 


...„„ 


Cady ave. 


('(i!-iiuhian roadOead end 


Private. 


JO 






Caldwell ave. 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


20 


. . . , 


210 


Calvin 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


263 


... 


Calvin 


Dimick st. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


30 


392 


. . . 


Cambria 


Central st. 


Benton road 


Public. 


40 


488 


... 


Cameron ave. 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


60 


1,065 


. . . 


Campbell pk. 


Meacham rd. 


Kingston st. 


Public. 


40 


399 


. . . 


Campbell Pk. pi 


.Kingston st. 


Arl'ton Br. R.R, 


Private. 


20 


.... 


84 


Carlton 


Somerville ave. 


Lake st. 


Public. 


40 


300 


... 


Carter terrace 


Summer st. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


171 


. . . 


Caruso pL 


Medford st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


110 


Carver 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private, 


40 


.... 


166 


Cedar ave. 


Cedar st. 


Linden ave. 


Pnltlic 


22 


293 


. . • 


Cedar ct. 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


15-f 


.... ' 


'0-1- 


Cedar St. pi. 


Murdock st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


. , . . 


378 


Cedar St. pi. 


Cedar n Elm st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


12+ 


i 


to+ 


Cedar 


Elm St. 


Broadwav 


Public. 


40 


4.137 




Central road 


Central st. 


E'ly and'N'ly 


Puhiic. 


40 


377 




Central road 


Central road 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


30 to 15 


221 




Central 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


33 


1,043 




Central 


Summer st. 


Medford st. 


Public, 


40 


2,539 




Central 


Medford st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


45 


1,079 




Centre 


Albion St. 


B. & L. R. R, 


Private, 


35 




ibfh 


Chandler 


Park ave. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


l'.2S2 




Chapel 


College ave. 


Chandler st. 


Public, 


40 


273 


.... 



CITY ENCilNEER. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Chapel ct. 

Charles 

Charlestown 

Charnwood rd. 

Cherry 

Cherry 

Chester 

Chester ave. 

Chester ave. 

Chester pi. 

Chestnut 

Chetwynd road 

Church 

City road 

Claremon 

Clarendon ave. 

Clark 

Cleveland 

Clifton 



Clifton 
Clyde 

College ave. 
College CIr. 
College Hill rd. 
Columbia 
Columbia ct. 
Columbus ave. 
Concord ave. 
Concord ave. 
Congress pi. 
Conlon ct. 
Connecticut av. 
Conwell ave. 
Conwell 
Cooney 

Corinthian road 
Cottage ave. 
Cottage circle 
Cottage pi. 
Craigie 
Craigie ter. 
Crescent 
Crescent 
Crocker 
Cross 

Cross St. (East) 
Cross St. pi. 
Crown 
Cummings 
Curtis ave. 
Curtis 
Cutler 
Cutter ave. 
Cutter pk. 
Cutter 
Cypress 

Dana 

Dane 

Dane ave. 

Dante terrace 

Dartmouth 

Day 

Dearborn road 

Delaware 

Dell 

Derby 

Dexter 

Dickinson 

Dickson 

Dimlck 



From 

Sycamore st. 
Washington st 
Allen St. 
Willow ave. 
Elm St. 
Highland ave. 
Elm St. 
Medford st. 
Angle 
Chester st. 
Poplar St. 
Curtis st. 
Summer st. 
Broadway 
Holland st. 
Broadway 
Newton st. 
Central st. 
Appleton st. 
Morrison ave. 
Cedar st, 
Davis sq 



To 



Northwesterly 
Southerly 
.Merriain st. 
Hancock st. 
Highland ave. 
Northeasterly 
Cambridge 
Angle 
Cross st 



Public 

or 
Private 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private, 
line Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



Width Length. 

in 
Feet Public Private 
12 
30 
15 
40 
45 
45 
40 
about 22 
20 



Northwesterly Private. 40 

Southeasterly Public. 40 

West Adams st. Public. 40 

Lake st. Public. 40 

Cedar st. Private. 45 

Mead St. Public. 40 

Cambridge line Public. 40 

Lincoln pky. Public. 35 

Harvard st. Public. 40 

Morrison ave. Public. 40 

Arlngtn Br. RR Private. 40 

Murdock St. Public. 30 

Medford line Public. 60 



College av. around to College av.Priyate. 10 and 12 

Conwell ave. 

Webster ave. 

Columbia st. 

Washington St. 

Prospect St. 

Wyatt St. 

Somerville ave. 

Columbia st. 

Mystic ave. 

Curtis St. 

Highland ave. 

Beacon st. 

Broadway 

Russell St. 

Cottage ave. 

Washington st. 

Somerville ave. 

16 Craigie st. 

Boston line 

Hadley st. 

Highland ave. 

Medford st. 

Broadway 

Cross st. 

Porter st. 

Fellsway 

Curtis st. 

Broadway 

Hinckley st. 

.Summer st. 

Cutter ave. 

Broadway 

Central st. 



Pearl st. 
Somerville ave. 
Dane st. 
Craigie st. 
Medford st. 
Elm St. 
Boston ave. 
Pearl st. 
Glen St. 
Temple st. 
Broadway 
Springfield at. 
Broadway 
Concord ave. 



North St. 
Cambridge line 
Webster ave. 
Walnut St. 
Wyatt St. 
Beacon st. 
Lin wood st. 
Easterly 
Penn. ave. 
North St. 
Southwesterly 
Line st. 
Cady ave. 
Chester st. 
Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Summer st. 
Westerly 
Hadley st. 
Pearl st. 
Crown St. 
Broadway 
ifystic ave. 
Northwesterly 
Lowell St. 
Middlesex ave. 
Hillsdale road 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Northwesterly 
Webster st. 
Beech st. 

Bonair st. 
Washington st. 
Iceland st. 
Westerly 
Broadway 
Cambridge line 
College ave. 
Aldrich st. 
Tufts St. 
Wheatland st. 
Medford line 
Beacon st. 
Fairmount ave. 
Calvin st. 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public, 

I'ublic. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public, 

Private. 

Public 30 

Public. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Pubhc. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public, 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



40 
40 
9 
40 
40 
30 
50 
20 
40 
40 
35 
30 
40 
40 
25 
about 11 
50 
25 
and 
30 
40 
45 
40 
24 
30 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
12 
40 
40 



166 

589 
1,450 

'885 
220 
451 

'537 
852 
964 

'560 

1,217 

552 

459 

200 

664 
4.080 

449 
816 

1,425 

1,483 

472 

202 

*487 

1,346 

363 

245 

560 
550 



99 



1,280 

'387 

174 

528 

2.680 

1,100 



40 
40 
30 
25 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 



654 
2,357 

480 

'736 
262 

696 

1,341 
569 

1.465 
908 
469 
451 
466 

1,081 

'776 
271 
»67 



130 

400 



110 



200 



9S0 



220 



284 



150 



200 



87 
160 

i2i. 



150 
700 
625 



170 

'si 



12& 



K 



nao 



ANM Al. ItKI'OUTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 




Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Dix pL 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 




loe 


Douglas ave. 


Edgar ave. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


162 


Dover 


Elm St. 


Cambridge lin« Public. 


40 


975 


. . . 


Dow 


Powder House 

Bd. 
Downer st. 


Ware st. 


Public. 


40 


257 


... 


Downer pi. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




125 


Downer 


Nashua st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


120 


Dresden circle 


Cutter ave. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 


• • . . 


133 


Durant 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Durham 


Beacon st. 


Hanson st. 


Public. 


40 


423 




Dynamo 


Willow ave. 


Whipple St. 


Private. 


30 




255 


Earle 


South St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


30 




322 


Earle 


End of above 


Fitchburg R. R 


Private. 


15 


.... 


115 


East Albion 


Mt. Vernon 


E. of MorelandPrivate. 


25 




188 




ave. 


St. 










East Albion 


ET. of MorelandMorehuKl 


l^-ivate. 


40 




77 


Kast Albion 


St. 

Moreland st. 


West side Fre 
mont St. 


-Public. 


3] 


2S.") 




East Albion 


Fi-eniont st. 


.Med fold line 


I^i-ivate. 


40 




V^s 


Eastman road 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


'296 




Edgar ave. 


Main st. 


Meacham st. 


Private. 


50 




800 


Edmands 


Broadway 


near Bonalr st 


Public. 


40 


376 




Edmonton ave. 


Cross St. 


Fell sway east 


Private. 


40 


.... 


630 


Electric ave. 


Mason st. 


Curtis St. 


Public. 


40 


1,374 




Eliot 


Vine St. 


Park St. 


Public. 


40 


291 




Ellington road 


Highland ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


35 


* • • • 


120 


Ellington road Ellington road 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


30 


• • . . 


265 


Ellsworth 


Cross St. 


Rush St. 


Public. 


40 


230 


. . . 


Elm ct. 


Villa ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 


• • > • 


70 


Elm pi. 


Harvard st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 




190 


Elm road 


Ehn st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 




183 


Elm 


Somerville ave 


.Cherry st. 


Public. 


63 


1.672 


• • > 


Elm 


Cherry st. 


White St. 


Public. 


63 to 60 


330 




Elm 


White St. 


Banks st. 


Public. 


60 


660 




am 


Banks st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


60 to 77.5 290 


• • • 


Elm 


Bf^ech St. 


TeTiney st. 


Public. 


77.5 to 60 


570 


• • . 


Elm 


Tenney st. 


Davis sq. 


Public. 


60 


1.429 


• • • 


Elmwood 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1,057 




Elmwood ter. 


Elmwood St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




190 


Elston 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


396 




Emerson 


Everett st. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 




170 


Endicott ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock St. 
(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 




800 


Essex 


Medford st. 


Rich dale ave. 


Public. 


40 


232 


. . . 


Eustis 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 


146 




Everett ave. 


Cross St. 


Dana st. 


Public. 


40 


845 




Everett 


Webster ave. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 




350 


Evergreen ave. 


Marshall st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


1*326 




Evergreen sq. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


22 




i79 


Eljcchange pi. 


Washington st. Southerly 


Private. 


4.5 





70 


Fairfax 


North St. 


Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 


40 


933 




Falrlee 


Cherry st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


30 


144 




Fairmount ave. 


Curtis st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


40 


679 


• • • 


Pairview ter. 


Sycamore st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


15 


• . . . 


173 


Farragut ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock St. 
(Ext'n) 


Public. 


40 


905 




J t Fells way 


Mystic ave. 


Mystic river 


Public. 


70 to 130 


2.500 




JtFellsway east 












(Winthrop 


Broadway 


Mystic are. 


Public. 


50 


1,322 




ave.) 














JtFellsway West 












(Chauncey) 
ave.) 
Fennell 


P. load way 


Mystic are. 


Public. 


50 


1,324 


... 


Hinckley st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


M 


• • . • 


m 


Fenwick 


Broadway 


.Taques st. 


Public. 


44> 


Ml 


. . . . 


Flsk ave. 


T>owell St. 


H'n ckley at. 


Public. 


20 


484 





ttMetropolltan Park CommlBsion Boulevard. 



("rrv k.\<;ixi;kii. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet P 


ublic Private 


Fltchburgr ct. 


Fitchburg st. 


Southeasterly 


Private, 


10 


.... 


2tt 


Fltchburg: 


Lin wood st. 


15. & L. R. R. 


Private, 


40 


.... 


400 


Flint ave. 


Flint St. 


Northerly 


Public. 


40 


202 


.... 


Flint 


Franklin st. 


Aldrich St. 


Public. 


40 


1,790 


.... 


Florence 


Washington st. 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


1,304 


.... 


Florence ter. 


Jaques st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


90 


Forest 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


117 


.... 


Forster 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Private. 


30 


.... 


430 


Foskett 


Willow ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


668 


.... 


Fountain ave. 


Cross St. 


Glen St. 


Public. 


30 


578 




Francesca ave. 


College ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


762 


.... 


Francis 


'Porter st. 


Conwell St. 


Pubhc. 


30 


180 


.... 


Franklin ave. 


Washington st 


. Franklin st. 


Public. 


20 


575 


.... 


Franklin pi. 


Franklin st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


100 


Franklin 


Broadway 


Washington st 


. Public. 


404- 


2,316 


. . . ■ 


Fremont ave. 


Bowdoin st. 


Lincoln pk. 


Public. 


30 


232 


.... 


Fremont 


Main st. 


Nr E. Albion st Public. 


40 


1,112 


.... 


Fremont 


Nr E. Albion st K. Albion 


rri\Hle. 


40 




59 


Fremont 


E. Albion st. 


N<)rtherl>' 


Public. 


40 


183 




Garden ct. 


Somerville ave 


. Fitchburg R. R 


. Private. 


25 




370 


Garfield ave. 


Broadway 


Blakeley ave. 


Public. 


40 


*447 


. • . . 


Garfield ave. 


Blakeley ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


• . • • 


983 


Garrison ave. 


Broadway 


Land of City 
of Camb. 


Public. 


40 


460 





Garrison ave. 


Land City of 
Camb. 


Woodstock St. 
(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 




390 


George 


Broadway 


Lincoln ave. 


Public. 


30 


275 


.... 


Gibbens 


Central st. 


Benton rd, w'ly Public. 


40 


665 


.... 


Giles pk. 


W^alnut St. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


32.71 


167 




Gill's ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


10 


. . . 


"ioo 


Oilman 


Cross St. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,430 


• • « • 


Oilman ter. 


Pearl st. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


360 


• • . . 


Gilson ter. 


Linden ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




124 


Glen 


Broadway 


Tufts St. 


Public. 


40 


2' 373 


• • • • 


Glendale ave. 


Cameron ave. 


Yorktown st. 


Public. 


40 


410 


* • • « 


Glen wood road 


Vernon st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,524 


• ♦ . . 


Glover circle 


Meacham road 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


110 


Gordon st. 


North St. 


Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 


40 


1,254 


• • . • 


Gorham 


Holland st. 


Howard st. 


Public. 


40 


763 


, , 


Gould ave 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 


• • • • 


156 


Gove ct. - 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


18 




144 


Grand View a\ 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


'542 


.... 


Granite 


Somerville ave. 


Osgood St. 


Public. 


40 


411 


.... 


Grant 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,405 


.... 


Greene 


Summer st. 


Laurel st. 


Public. 


40 


555 


.... 


Greenville 


Medford st. 


Munroe st. 


Public. 


40 


660 




Greenville ter. 


Greenville st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


20 




'250 


Greenwood ter 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


• • • • 


166 


Gritter way 


College ave. 


Bromfield rd. 


Private. 


4 


• • • • 


160 


Grove 


Elm St. 


Morrison ave. 


Public. 


40 


996 





Hadley ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


16 




74 


Hall ave. 


College ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


926 


.... 


Hall 


Cedar st. 


Cherry st. 


Public. 


30 


456 


.... 


Hamlet 


Highland ave. 


Boston St. 


Public. 


30 


616 




Hamilton road 


Russell road 


North St. 


Public. 


40 


560 




Hammond 


Dickinson st. 


Concord ave. 


Public. 


40 


267 




Hancock 


Elm St. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


1.349 


.... 


Hancock 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


50 


376 




Hanson ave. 


Hanson st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


30 




252 


Hanson 


Washington st. 


Skehan st. 


Public. 


30 


'469 




Hanson 


Skehan st. 


Vine St. 


Public. 


35 


347 




Hard an road 


Pow. House Bd.Ware st. 


Private. 


20 and 40 


'283 


Harding 


No. of Ward st. Cambridge line Public. 


30 


465 




Harold 


Dimick st. 


Marion st. 


Public. 


40 


316 




Harold St. 


Woods ave. 


Medford Line 


Private 


40 


.... 


248 


Harrison 


Ivaloo St. 


Kent St. 


Public. 


40 


'644 




Harrison 


Elmwood St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


40 




'aio 


Harvard pi. 


Harvard st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


35 




2O0 


Harvard 


Summer st. 


Beech St. 


Public. 


40 


*7i7 




Hathorn 


Broadway 


Arlington st. 


Public. 


40 


S89 


• • • • 



332 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Hawthorne 


Willow ave. 


Cutter ave. 


Public. 


30 


807 


• • • • 


Hawkins 


Somerville ave. 


Washington St. 


Public. 


40 


330 


^ ^ 


Hayden ter. 


Linden ave. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 


• • • 


12a 


Heath 


Temple st. 


Bond St. 


Public. 


45 


1,043 


• • • • 


Heath 


Bond St. 


Moreland st. 


Public. 


40 


754 


• • • • 


Henderson 


Richardson st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


20 


569 


, , 


Hennessy ct. 


Medford st. 


Fisk ave. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


25& 


Henrietta ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


8 and 20 


.... 


161 


Henry ave. 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


40 


290 


.... 


Herbert 


Chester st. 


Day St. 


PubUc. 


40 


337 


. 


Hersey 


Berkeley st. 


Oxford St. 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


28& 


Higgrins ct. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


16 


• • • • 


14» 


High 


North St. 


Alewife Brk PkyPublic. 


40 


679 


.... 


Highland ave. 


Medford st. 


I^avis sq. 


Public. 


60 


9,135 


.... 


Highland path. 


Morrison ave. 


Arlington Br. 


Private. 


10 


. - • • 


107 


east 




R. R. 










Highland path. 


Morrison ave. 


Arlington Br. 


Private. 


10 


• • • • 


10& 


west 




R. R. 










fHighland rd. 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Pub. 30(70wide) 


1,499 


.... 


Hill 


Broadway 


Fairmount ave 


. Public. 


40 


284 




Hillsdale rd. 


Conwell ave. 


Sunset rd. 


Public. 


40 


682 


• • •» 


Hillside ave. 


Pearl st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


30 


• • • • 


150 


Hillside cir. 


Craigie st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


16 


• • • • 


151 


Hillside pk. 


^^'alnut St. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


40 


196 


.... 


Hinckley 


Broadwaj' 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 30 and 35 


1,081 


• • • • 


Hodgdon pi. 


Dane ave. 


Notiheasterly 


Private. 


about 20 


.... 


150 


Holland 


Dm vis sq. 


liioadway 


Public. 


60 


2,696 




Holt's ave. 


Oak St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


'ioo 


Holyoke road 


Elm St. around to Elm st. 


Public. 


40 


637 


.... 


Homer sq. 


Bonner ave. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


30-f- 


200 


.... 


Horace 


South St. 


Fitch burg R. R 


. Public. 


30 


517 


.... 


Houghton 


Springfield st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


653 


. . . .. 


Howard 


Thorndike st. 


(lOrham street Public. 


40 


431 




Howe 


Marshall st. 


School St. 


Public. 


40 


445 


.... 


Hudson 


Central st. 


Cedar st. 


Public. 


40 


2,760 


..... 


Hunting 


South St. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 


117 


.... 


Ibbetson 


Somerville ave. 


Lowell st. 


Public. 


40 


802 




Illinois ave. 


Bioadway 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


427 


.... 


Indiana ave. 


Broadway 


I'enn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


384 


.... 


Irving 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1.180 


. . . 


Irvin^ton rd. 


Mystic Valley 
Pky. 


Medford line 


Piivate. 


40 





484- 


1^'^aloo 


Beacon st. 


Park St. 


Public. 


40 


685 


.... 


James 


Pearl st. 


Radcliffe road 


Public. 


40 


320 




Jaques 


Fellsway west 


Temple st. 


Public. 


40 


1,182 




Jaques 


Temple st. 


Bond St. 


Public. 


45 


1,005 




Jaques 


Bond St. 


Edgar ave. 


Public 


40 


895 


• • • •■ 


Jasper pi. 


Walnut St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




80 


Jasper 


Pearl st. 


Oilman st. 


Public. 


40 


283 




Jay 


Holland st. 


Howard st. 


Public. 


40 


534 




Jerome ct. 


Sycamore st. 


Jerome st. 


Private. 


10 




iso 


Jerome 


Montrose st. 


.Terome ct. 


Private. 


20 




126 


Jerome 


Lawrence rd. 


Mystic Val. py Private. 


40 




4»& 


Joseph 


Newton st. 


Tiincoln pky 


Public. 


40 


458 




Josephine ave. 


Morrison ave. 


P. road way 


Public. 


45 


1,718 




Joy 


AVashington st. 


Poplar St. 


Public. 


30 


1,121 




Joy St. pi. 


Joy St. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


16 




iei 


Kenneson road 


Broadway 


Walnut road 


Private. 


30 




82ft 


Kensington av 


. Bioadway 


P.lakeley ave. 


Public- 


40 


455 




•Kensington av Blakelev ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




i.iso 


Kent ct. 


Kent St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


about 2f 


) .... 


420 


Kent 


Somerville ave 


. Fitchburg R. R Public. 


40 


292 




Kent 


Fitch burg R. R 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


25 


386 




Kenwood 


College ave. 


Billingham st. 


Public. 


40 


322 




Kidder ave. 


College ave. 


Bcston ave. 


Public. 


40 


2,554 




Kilby 


Somerville ave 


. Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




'i80 


Kilsyth road 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




( 


Kimball 


Lowell St. 


Craigie st. 


Private. 


40 


• • . . 


808 



tRoadway (only) accepted 30 feet wide, full width of street 70 feet 



crrv K\(;[i\KER. 



Table Showing 



the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Kingman road 

Kingston 

Knapp 

Knowlton 

Knowlton 

Lake 

Lamson ct. 
Landers 
Langmaid ave. 
Latin way 
Laurel ave. 
Laurel 
Laurel ter. 
Lawrence road 
Lawson ter. 
Lee 
Leland 
Leon 

Leonard pi. 
Leonard 
Lesley ave. 
Leslie pi. 
Lester ter. 
Lewis 

Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Liberty ave. 
Liberty rd. 
Lincoln ave. 
Lincoln pky 
Lincoln pi. 
Lincoln 
Linden ave. 
Linden circle 
Linden pi. 
Linden 
Line 

Linehan ct. 
Linwood pi. 
Linwood 
London 
Loring 

Louisburg pi. 
Lovell 

Lowden ave. 
Lowell 
Lowell 

Lowell circle 
Lowell ter. 

Madison 
Magnus ave. 
Magnus ave. 
Main 

Maine ave. 
Maine ter. 
Mallet 
Malloy ct. 
Malvern ave. 
Mansfield 
Maple ave. 
Maple pi. 
Maple 

Mardel circle 
Marion 
Marshall 
Mason 
May pi. 



From 



To 



Public 
or 



Private 
Washington st. Fitchburg R. R. Private. 
Meacham road Cambridge line Public. 
School St. Granite st. Public. 

Tufts St. N'E' line Est. SIPublic. 

End of above Oliver st. Private. 



Width Length 
in 

Feet Public Private 

25 400 

40 647 

40 379 

40 461 

40 464 



Hawkins st. 
Linwood St. 
School St. 
Broadway 
Professors row 
Laurel st. 
Somerville ave. 
Laurel st, 
Meclford line 
Putnam st. 
Medford st. 
Washington st. 
Concord ave, 
Joy St. 
Broadway 
Highland ave. 
Highland ave. 
Meacham road 
Magnus ave. 
Willow ave. 
Hancock st. 
Angle 
Broadway 
Morrison ave. 
Lincoln st. 
Washington st. 
Lincoln ave. 
Broadway 
Elm St. 
Linden ave. 
Linden ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Linwood st. 
Linwood st. 
Washington st 
Linwood st. 
Somerville ave. 
Autumn st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Lowell St. 
Lowell St. 

School St. 
Washington st. 
Lewis St. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Maine ave. 
Willow ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Cameron ave. 
Somerville ave. 
School St. 
Marshall st. 
Poplar St. 
Spring St. 
Concord ave. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Hawkins st. 



Church St. 
Poplar St. 
Westerly 
Heath st. 
Talbot ave. 
Northwesterly 
, Summer st. 
Southeasterly 
Mystic Val. py 
Easterly 
Rich dale ave. 
Dane ave. 
Dickinson st. 
Northeasterly 
Pow. House Bd, 
Lexington ave. 
Northerly 
Northwesterly 
Deadend 
Hancock st. 
Angle 
Cedar st. 
Appleton st. 
Liberty ave. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Perry st. 
Northerly 
Perkins st. 
Cedar ave. 
Southeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Charlestown st. 
Cambridge line 
Chestnut st. 
Southwesterly 
Fitchburg st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Osgood st. 
Easterly 
Electric ave. 
Foskett St. 
Summer st. 
^Tedford st. 
Westerly 
Northwesterly 

Sycamore st. 
Lewis St. 
Southerly 
Medford line 
Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
Tviberty ave. 
Merriam ave. 
Yorktown st. 
Washington st. 
Southeasterly 
Maple ave. 
Medford st. 
Northwesterly 
Dimick St. 
Pearl st. 
Pow. House Bd, 
Easterly 



Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private, 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public, 

Private. 

.Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

I'ublic. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pi-ivate. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Priv. 11 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



40 

20 

40 

30 

60 

18 

40 

23 

40 
5 

40 

40 

40 

13 + 

40 

40 

12 

20 

40 

50 
45 to 40 

40 

40 

16 

30 

40 
9 

40 

45 

24 

20 

33 

33 
about 15 
about 12 

50 

40 

40 

13 

40 

40 

36 

40 
and 27.5 

20 

40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
32 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
5 
30 



840 

228 
353 



983 



385 
359 
155 

450 
333 



416 
624 
147 
578 
1.493 

'478 
1,520 

"550 
1,413 



587 
1,727 



2,114 

"dz 

'385 
1,247 
1,259 
3,472 



891 

429 

966 
379 
205 
657 

410 
735 

319 

699 



40 1,141 

40 1.650 

40 6S1 
12 



370 



250 
125 

256 

586 
200 



98 



75 
190 



200 
i20 



120 
160 



200 
150 

340 

'90 



148 

150 



SO 

'255 
'125 

"iio 



334 



ANNl AL ItKroiiTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued, 



ytieet 

McCarroll ct. 
McGregor ave. 

Meacham road 
Meacham 

Meacl St. 
-Mead yt. 
Medford 
Medford 
Melvin 

Merriam ^ye. 
Merriam 
Merriam 
Michigan ave. 
fMiddlesex ave. 
Milk pi. 
Miller st. 
Milton 
Miner 

Minnesota ave. 
Mondamin ct. 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Montgomery av 
Montrose ct. 
Montrose 
Moore 
Moi-eland 
Morgan 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Morrison pi. 
Mortimer pi. 
Morton 
Mossland 
Mountain ave. 
Mousal pi. 
Mt. Pleasant ct 
Mt. Pleasant 
♦Mt. Vernon av 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Munroe 
Munroe 
Murdock 
Murray st. 
Museum 
Myrtle ct. 
Myrtle pi. 
Myrtle 
Mystic ave. 
ttMystic ave. 
Mystic 

t Mystic Valley 
Parkway 

Nashua 
Nevada ave. 
Newberne 
Newberne 

Newbury park 
Newbury 



From 

Clyde St. 
Wiggles worth 

St. 

Dover St. 

Mt. Vernon ave, 

Moore St. 

End of above 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Merriam st. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Mj Stic ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Sacramento st 
Orchard st. 
Vernon st. 
Broadway 
Ivaloo St. 
Central st. 
End of above 
. Broadway 
Montrose st. 
School St. 
Holland St. 
Main st. 
Beacon st. 
Cedar st. 
Willow ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Marshall st. 
Glen st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. 
No. Union st. 
, Perkins st. 
Broadway 
.Meacham st. 
Washington st. 
Pearl st. 
Perkins st. 
Walnut St. 
End of above 
Cedar st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Myrtle st. 
Myrtle st. 
Washington St. 
Chariest' n line 
Union st. 
I^enedict st. 
Medford line 



Public 
To or 

Piivate 

SouthwiBsterly Private. 
W^alnut St. Private. 

Cambridge line Public. 

.Medford line Public. 

N'r Cameron av Public. 

Cameron ave Private 

Central st. Public. 

J Broadway Public. 

Bonair st. Public. 

Malloy ct. Private. 

Somei-ville ave. Public. 
Charlestown st. Public. 

Perm. ave. Public. 

Fellsway Public. 

Southwesterly Private. 

Beacon st. Public. 
Cambridge line Public. 

Ames St. Public. 

Penn. ave. Public. 

Harrison st. Private. 

Westerly Public. 

Harvard st. Private. 

Wellington ave. Public. 

B. & L. R. R. Private. 

Sycamore st. Public. 

Mead st. Public. 

Mystic ave. Public. 

Park st. Public. 

W^illow ave. Public. 

College ave. Public. 

Northerly Private. 

Easterly Private. 

Easterly Private. 

Knowlton st. Public. 

Elm St. Public. 

nr Tjinden ave. Public. 

B. & M. R. R. Private. 

Southwesterly Private. 

Perkins St. Public. 

Mxstic ave. Private. 

Pearl St. Public. 

P(^rkins st. . Public. 

Broadway Public. 

Eastei-ly Public. 

Boston St. Public. 

Clyde St. Public. 

Southerly Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Westerly Private. 

Perkins st. Public. 

Union st. Public. 

Medford line Public 

Mystic ave. Public. 

Arlington line Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



liichardson St. B. & L. R. R. Public. 



^'illage st. 
Appleton St. 
Morrison ave. 

Newbury st. 
Holland st. 



Hanson st. 



Private. 



Morrison ave. Public. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. Private. 

Southeasterly Private. 
Cambridge line Public. 



25 
13 

40 
40 

40 
40 
50 
55 
40 
15 
40 
30 
40 
60 
about 30 
30-33 
40 
40 
40 
25 
40 
35 
40 
12 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
20 
15 
20 
40 
40 
22 
20 
40 
33 
50 
40 
50 
40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
40 
10 

20 + 
40 
60 
66 
40 
60 



35 
20 
40 

40 
55 
40 



1,060 

777 
345 

8, 047 
1,985 

487 

'360 

510 

470 

2,304 

466 

223 
244 
525 

'267 

'265 

'886 

695 

1,471 

377 

1,366 

1,690 



287 
377 

280 



584 

'600 
473 
590 
375 
1,214 
853 
190 
164 



1,423 
378 

6,938 
336 

2,530 



637 
'266 



75 
302 



95 
255 

ioo 

250 
266 

iio 



190 
175 

172 



200 
260 

764 



100 
120 



1,260 



200 



178 
68 



•Proposed. 

ttState Highway Austin St. to Medford line. 

tState Highway. 

TMe! ropoliiaii Paik Conimissirm Boulevard. 



CITY ENCINKKK. 



335 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

N. Hampshire 

ave. 
Newman pi. 
Newton pi. 
Newton 
Newton 
Norfolk 
North 

North 

North Union 
Norton 
Norwood ave. 

Oak Circle 

Oak 

Oak 

Oak St. pi. 

Oak ter. 

Oakland ave. 

Olive ave. 

Olive sq. 

Oliver 

Orchard 

Osgood 

Ossipee road 

Otis 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Packard ave. 

Packard ave. 

Palmer ave. 

Park ave. 

Park pi. 

Park pi. 

Park 

Parkdale 

Parker pi. 

Parker 

Partridge ave. 

Patten ct. 

Paulina 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pearl St. pi. 

Pearl ter. 

Pearson ave. 

Pearson road 

Pembroke ct. 

Pembroke 

Penn. ave. 

Penn. ave. 

Perkins pi. 

Perkins 

Peiry 

Peterson ter. 

Philips pi. 

Pinckney pi. 

Pinckney 

Piper ave. 

Pitman 

Pitman 

Pleasant ave. 

Poplar ct. 

Poplar 

Poplar 

Poplar 

Porter ave. 



From 



To 



.Mystic ave. 
Cedar st. 
Newton st. 
Prospect St. 
Webster ave. 
Webster ave. 
Broadway 

Medford line 

b. 17 
Mystic ave. 
Nashua st. 
Broadway 

Cambridge line 
Prospect St. 
Angle 
Oak St. 
Elm St. 
Marshall st. 
Linden ave. 
Lake st. 
Franklin st. 
Cambridge line 
Granite st. 
Mason St. 
Cross St. ' 
School St. 
Beacon st. 

Broadway 
Professors row 
Franklin st. 
College ave. 
Laurel st. 
Park pi. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Washington st. 
A'ernon st. 
Cutter St. 
Broadway 
Crescent st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross St. 
Pearl st. 
Pearl st. 
Morrison ave. 
Broadway 
Pembroke st. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Wisconsin ave. 
Perkins st. 
Franklin st. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Spring St. 
Pinckney st. 
Washington st. 
Cedar st. 
Beech st. 
Spring st. 
Walnut St. 
Poplar St. 
Somerville ave. 
Lin wood st. 
Joy St. 
Porter st. 



Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
E.'isterly 
Webster ave. 
Concord sq. 
Cambridge line 
JNIedford line 

b. IT 
Medford line 

b. 18 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Medford st. 



Public 

or 
Private 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 406 

15 

about 10 .... 

25 470 

40+ 637 

40 283 

40 1,961 



10© 
100 



Northerly Private. 

Angle Public. 

Cainbridge line Public. 
Northerly Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
School St. Public. 

Peterson ter. Private. 
Southerly Private. 

Cross St. Public. 

Meacham road Public. 
E'ly & w'ly Private. 
Curtis St. Public. 

Wigglesworth stPublic. 
Central st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 



Professors row 
Medford line 
Northw^esterly 
Wallace st. 
Easterly 
Northeasterly 
Beacon st. 
Lewis St. 
Northwesterly 
Fremont ave. 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 
Holland St. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross St. 
Medford st. 
Northeasterly 
Northerly 
Boston ave. 
Dearborn road 
Southwesterly 
Sycamore st. 
Wisconsin ave. 
Cross St. 
Northeasterly 
Charlest'n line 
Tyiiicoln pkway 
Olive ave. 
Westerly 
Southeasterly 
Perkins st. 
Westerly 
Spring St. 
Belmont St. 
Vinal ave. 
Southeasterly 
Lin wood St. 
.Toy St. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northwesterly 



Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Piivate. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 



37 to 42 
30 
20 

40 

30 

40 

30 

4 

10+ 
40 
25 
about 15 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
50 

60 
60 
20 
40 
30 
20 
50 
40 
20 
35 
40 

8 
40 
37 
50 
40 
50 
20 
23 
45 
40 
25 
40 
50 
40 
20 
40 
40 

7.5 
15 + 
24 
40 
20 
30 
26 
40 
10 
30 
35 
35 
20 



649 



350 



665 
563 



440 



1,085 
1,567 

1*375 

1,200 

1,361 

100 

1,758 



467 



1,238 
500 

'203 
1,467 

'769 

341 

957 

1,060 

2,447 
166 

1,320 
1,713 

'436 
1,112 

350 

1,336 
606 



1,186 



543 

Hi 

315 



60O 
200 



Sfe 



8& 
90) 

i5& 
100 



450 



240 
200 

522 

120 



150 

ioo 

iei 

iso 

260 



156 
100 

125 

91 
37T 
390 



6& 
22<^ 






ANXIA 



in:i'()!ri" 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Pi 


•ivate 


Porter 


Elm St. 


Mountain ave. 


Public. 


45 


1.622 


.... 


Porter 


Mountain ave. 


Higliland ave. 


Public. 


40 


415 


.... 


Powder house 


Powder house 


Alewife Brook 










boulevard 


square 


Parkway 


Public. 


80 


4,660 


.... 


Pow. house ter. 


Kidder ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


585 


.... 


Prentiss 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


35 




150 


Prescott 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


I'.iio 


• • • • 


Preston road 


School St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


839 


• • • • 


Prichard ave. 


^Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Pubhc. 


40 


1,191 


• • • • 


Princeton 


Alpine st. 


Lowell st. 


Public. 


40 


648 


• • • • 


■"♦Princeton 


Lowell St. 


Centre st. 


Private. 


40 




540 


Professors row 


College ave. 


Curtis St. 


Public. 


40 


2' 000 




Proposed 


Fellsway 


Middlesex aye. 


Private. 


40 


• • * . 


igs 


Proposed 


Fellsway 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




315 


Proposed 


Fells way- 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


• • . . 


340 


Prospect 


Washington St. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


2,071 


• • • • 


Prosp't Hill av. 


M^dford St. 


Munroe St. 


Public. 


40 


597 




Prosp't Hill pkyMunroe st. 


Stone ave. 


Public. 


40 


400 


• • • • 


Prospect pi. 


Prospect St. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


130 


Putnam 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,262 


.... 


Quincy 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


781 


.... 


Radcliffe road 


Walnut St. 


Bradley st. 


Public. 


35 


392 




Ra-d cliff e road 


Bradley st. 


Marshall st. 


Public. 


40 


261 


.... 


Randolph pi. 


Cross St. 


Westerly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


244 


Raymond ave. 


Curtis St. 


North St. 


Public. 


40 


1,345 


• • • • 


Record ct. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


110 


Reed's ct. 


Oliver st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




71 


Remick ct. 


Cutter St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


100 


Rhode Is. ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Penn. ave. 


Pubhc. 


40 


460 


.... 


Richardson 


Lowell st. 


Hinckley st. 


Public. 


35 


467 




Richardson ter. 


Richardson st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




135 


Ulchdale ave. 


School St. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


"875 


.... 


Roberts 


Hinckley st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




170 


Robinson 


Central st. 


I-;artlett st. 


Public. 


40 


*582 


.... 


Rogers ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,682 




Roland 


Waverly st. . 


Boston line 


Private. 


40 


• . • • 


"ioo 


Rose 


Washington st. 


Lewis St. 


Public. 


40 


450 




Roseland 


Beacon st. 


Cjimbridge line Public. 


40 


121 


.... 


Rossmore 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


534 




Royce pi. 


Bonair st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 + 




*i75 


Ru?h 


Broadway 


Flint St. 


Public. 


40 


l",466 




Russell rd. 


Broadway 


N. line Hamil- 


- 












ton rd. 


Public. 


40 


559 




Russell rd. 


N. Line Ham- 














ilton rd. 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 




75 


Russell 


Elm St. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'ioo 




Sacramento 


Somerville ave. 


, b'itchburg R. R 


. Public. 


40 


80 


.... 


Sacramento 


Fitchburg R. R 


. Beacon st. 


Public. 


40 


290 


• • • . 


Sacramento 


Beacon st. 


C^am bridge line Public. 


40 


154 


• • • * 


Sanborn ave. 


Warren ave. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


280 


• • . • 


Sanborn ct. 


Washington st. 


, Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




17<? 


Sargent ave. 


Broadway 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1.075 


• • . - 


Sartwell ave. 


Cedar st. 


Cherry st. 


Public. 


35 


427 


• . • * 


Sawyer ave. 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. 


Private. 


40 




690 


School 


Somerville ave. 


, Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


l*96i 


• • ■ • 


School 


Highland ave. 


Broadway 


Public. 


50 


2,500 




Sellon pi. 


Marshfill st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


12 


• • • ■ 


'i26 


Seven Pines av 


. Cameron ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


92 




Sewall ct. 


Sewall St. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


25 


• • . 


'i90 


Sewall 


Grant st. 


Temple st. 


Public. 


40 


615 


• • • • 


Shawmut 


Washington st. 


Cross st. 


Public. 


40 


576 




Shedd 


Somerville are, 


, Merriam ave. 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


tit 


Sherman ct. 


Sargent ave. 


Marshall st. 


Private. 


10 


• ■ • • 


250 


♦.Shore I)rive 


Kellswit.\ 


Mystic ave. 


I'rivate 


40 




2.036 


-and stroots or 


1 Walker Property 


Pi-iva1e 








•A" street 


KellswaA- 


Shore drive 


Private. 


"40 




ls'552 


-•p." street 


Fe]lswa>' 


Shore drive 


f^rivate. 


40 




1.420 


-•('" street 


Ke 11 sway 


Shore drive 


1 'ri vatf . 


40 




],L".*1 


-I)'" street 


Fellsway 


Shore drive 


I'rivate. 


40 




1,11'1> 


"K" street 


I-Vll.sway 


Shoi-e drive 


I'rixale. 


40 




1,r42 


♦I"*) i:])l>.-'0(l. 















CITY KXGINRKR. 



• >.)7 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

■P" street 
•G" street 

"H" street 

Sibley ct. 

Sibley pi. 

Simpson ave. 

Skehan 

Skehan 

Skilton 

Smith ave. 

Snow ter. 
Somervllle ave. 
Somervllle ave. 
South 

Spencer ave. 
Spring- 
Spring-field 
Spring Hill ter. 
Stanford ter. 
Steeves circle 
Sterling- st. 
Stickney ave. 
St. James ave. 
St. James ave. 
ext. 

Stone ave. 

Stone ave. 

Stone pi. 

Strathmore rd. 

Summer 

Summit ave. 

Summit 

Sunnyside ave. 

Sunset rd. 

Sycamore 
Sycamore 
Sycamore 
Sydney 

Talbot ave. 
*Tannery Ex. 

Taunton 

Taunton 

Taylor pi. 

Taylor 

Teele ave. 

Temple 

Tenney ct. 

Tennyson 

Thorndike 

Thorndike 

Thorpe, 
Thurston 
Timmins pi. 
Tower ct. 
Tower 
Tremont pi. 
Tremont 
Trull 

Trull lane 
Tufts parkway 
Tufts 

Turner ct. 
Tyler 

Union 
Union pi. 

♦Proposed. 



From 

Krll.^way 
Shore drive 

.^'hore drive 

Cutter St. 

Cutter St. 

Broadway 

Dane st. 

Hanson 

Pearl st. aroun 

Beacon st. 

.laques st. 

E. Camb. line. 

Union sq. 

Medford st. 

Cedar st. 

Somervllle ave 

Concord ave. 

Highland ave. 

Beacon st. 

Cherry st. 

North St. 

Marshall st. 

Elm St. 

Summer st. 

Union sq. 
Columbus ave. 
Stone ave. 
Broadway 
Bow St. 
Walnut St. 
College ave. 
. Walnut St. 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Grant st. 

Packard ave. 
Cambridge line 

W^yatt. St. 
Angle 

Somervllle ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Packard ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Forster st. 
Holland st. 
Underpass st. 

Highland ave. 
Broadway 
Dane st. 
Tyler st. 
Crown St. 
Tremont st. 
Webster ave. 
Vernon st. 
Highland ave. 
College ave. 
Washington st. 
Franklin st. 
Vine St. 

Broadway 
Linwood st. 



To 



.Shore drix'e 
••15" street 
•"E" street 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Holland st. 
Hanson st. 
Durham 
d to Pearl st. 
Uine St. 
Southwesterly 
Union sq. 
N. Camb. line 
Water st. 
Hancock st. 
Summer st. 
Cambridge line Public. 
Belmont st. Public. 

Northeasterly Private 
Easterly Private 

Alewife Brk Pkyfublic. 
School St. Public. 

Summer st. Public. 

Northeasterly Public. 



Public 

or 
Private 
i 'rivaLe. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



Width Length 
in 



Columbus ave. Public. 
Prosp't Hill py. Public. 
Southeasterly Public. 
Medford line 
Elm St. 
Vinal ave. 
Uillingham st. 
Wigglesworth stPublic 
Hillsdale road I^iil)Iic 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Highland ave. 
Temple st. 



Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 



College ave. 
Woodstock st. 

(Ext'n) 
East'y to angle 
Marion st. 
Southerly 
Sydney st. 
Curtis St. 
Mystic ave. 
Northeasterly 
Pembroke st. 
Kingston st 
i;. & M. R. R 
Arlington Br. 
Southwesterly 
Richdale ave. 
Westerly 
Northeasterly 
Highland ave. 
Southeasterly 
Cambridge line 
Medford st. 
Oxford St. 
College ave. 
Ctos.s st. 
Westerly 
Dane st. 

Mystic ave. 
Southwesterly 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pul)lic. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public, 

Public. 

Private, 

Public. 

Public. 
Private. 



Feet Public Pr 

40 



40 

40 

10 

10 

40 

30 

30 

40 

254- 

16 

75 

70 

30 

40 

40 

40 

20 

20 

15 

40 

40 

40 

30 

40 
38 
30 
40 
45 
45 
40 



018 
306 



4,325 

6,793 
989 
727 

1,220 
788 
673 



813 
458 
488 
125 

676 
107 
142 



7,900 
532 
262 
25 to 35 306 

40 t-j.jfj 



45 

40 
35 

40 

50 

40 
30 
20 
i5 
40 
40 
66 
30 
40 
40 
20 

30 
40 
3.5 
25 
40 
about 10 
40 
40 
15 
22 
40 
20 
40 

40 

10 



1,275 

667 
722 
679 



309 

685 

1,637 

*922 

nso 

SS 

468 
1.660 



559 

'589 
.050 

"966 
982 

'464 

345 



ivate 
1,39!) 
27tj 
244 
100 
100 



414 
540 
206 
120 



200 
120 



16 



1,409 

160 

170 

95 

200 



400 



97 
150 

"75 
266 
150 

ioo 



338 



ANNUAL RBPOBTB 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Upland Park 
Upland road 

Vermont ave. 

Vernon 

Vernon 

Vernon 

Victoria 

Villa ave, 

/illage 
Vinal ave. 
Vinal 
Vine ct. 
Vine 
Vine 
Vine 
Virginia 

Wade ct. 
Waldo ave. 
Waldo 
Walker 
Wallace 
Walnut 
Walnut road 
Walter terrace 
Walter 

Ward 

Ware 

Warner 

Warren ave. 

Warren 

Warwick place 

Warwick 

Washington av. 

Washington pi. 

Washington 

Washington 

Washington 

Water 

Waterhouse 

Watson 

Waverly 

Webster ave. 

Webster 

Wellington ave. 

Wellington ave. 

Wesley pk. 

Weslev 

West " 

West 



From 

Main st. 
Curtis St. 

Mystic ave. 
Central st. 
Glenwood road. 
Partridge ave. 
Broadway 
Winslow ave. 

Dane st. 
Summer st. 
Richardson st. 
Vine St. 
Somerville ave. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
Hanson st. 
Aldrich St. 

Cedar st. 
P.eacon st. 
Highland ave. 
Broadway 
Holland st. 
Bow St. 
Walnut St. 
Walter st. 
Walnut St. 

Med ford st. 
Curtis St. 
Pow. House sq. 
Union sq. 
Med ford st. 
Warwick st. 
Cedai- st. 
Washington st. 
Washington st. 
Charlest'n line 
Fianklin ave. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
."-^outh St. 
Bioadway 
Broadway 
Washington st. 
ITnion sq. 
Franklin st. 
Walnut st. 
Montgomery av. 
^Vesley sq. 
Pearl st. 
Hawthorne st. 
Highland ave. 



West Adams Con well ave. 

Westminster Broadway 

Weston ave. Clarendon ave. 

West Quincy Bailey st. 

Westwood road Central st. 

Wheatland Broadway 

Wheeler Pinckney st. 

Whipple Highland ave. 



tWhite 

White St. pi. 

Whitfield road 

Whitman 

Wigglesworth 

William 

William 

tSidewalk 



Elm St. 
White St. 
Packard ave. 
Mason st. 
Pearl st. 
College ave. 
Broadway 
In Somerville. 



To 

Southwesterly 
Hillsdale road 

Penn. ave. 
Glenwood road 
Partridge ave. 
Lowell St. 
Cambridge line 
Arlington Br. 

R. K. 
Vine St. 
Highland ave. 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Fitchburg R. R 
Hanson st. 
P.eacon st. 
Jasper st. 

Westerly 
Dimick st. 
Hudson St. 
Leonard st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Kenneson road 
.Southwesterly 
about 100 ft N. 
of Bradley st. 
Harding st. 
Russell rd. 
Med ford line 
Columbus ave. 
Cambridge line 
Northeasterly 
Warwick pi. 
Northerly 
Southerly 
Franklin ave. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
(:'ambridge line 
Northerly 
Cambridge line 
Fairmount ave. 
Roland st. 
Cambridge line 
Cross st. 
Montgomery av 
Easterly 
Northeasterly 
Otis St. 
Highland ave. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Medford line 
Electric ave. 
Broadway 
Medford line 
Benton road 
Mystic ave. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Arlinsrton Br. 

R. R. 
Cambridge line 
Southeasterly 
Curtis st. 
Packard ave. 
Bonair st. 
Chandler st. 
Medford line 



Public 


Width 


Length 




or 


in 






Pi-ivate 


Feet Pubhc Priv 


ate 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


175 


Private. 


40 





656 


Public. 


40 


4SI 




Public. 


40 


764 




Public. 


40 to 3C 


190 




Public. 


30 


434 




Public. 


40 


1.086 




Private. 


35 




200 


Private. 


25 


.... 


370 


Public. 


45 


1,425 


. . . . 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


200 


Private. 


25 


. . • • 


140 


.Public. 


40 


540 




Private. 


40 




222 


Public. 


30 


662 


• • • • 


Public. 


40 


405 





Private. 


20 




180 


Public. 


40 


'277 


• • • • 


Public. 


40 


287 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


713 


. • • • 


Public. 


40 


1,342 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


3,948 


• . 


Public. 


40 


270 


• • . 


Public. 


40 


222 


... 


Public. 


40 


548 




Public. 


30 


433 




Public. 


40 


749 




Public. 


60 


50O 


. • . 


Public. 


40 


663 




Public. 


30 to 40 


109 




Private. 


15 




150 


Public. 


40 


665 


. 


Private. 


18 


• - • > 


350 


Private. 


about 7.5 .... 


114 


Public. 


75 


1.060 


• • • 


Public. 


60 to 100 


3.977 




Public. 


60 


2,344 




Public. 


25 


366 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


987 


• . * 


['ublic. 


40 


236 




Private. 


35 




200 


Public. 


49.5 


1,955 


• . . 


Public. 


40 


1.034 


... 


Public. 


40 


215 


, 


Private. 


40 




85 


Public. 


40 


'405 




Public. 


40 


515 




Public. 


30 


192 




Private. 


30 




266 


Public. 


40 


'iio 




Public. 


40 


376 


, 


Private. 


40 


• • • . 


525 


Public. 


40 


292 




Public. 


40 


489 


... 


Public. 


40 


1.364 




Public. 


40 


269 




Private. 


30 




318 


Public. 




'307 




Private. 


20 




200 


Public. 


40 


"687 


• • • 


Public 


40 


632 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


744 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


381 


, 


Private. 


50 




50 



CITY EX(iINEKR. 



339 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Concluded. 



street 

Williams ct. 
Willoughby 
Willow ave. 
Willow pi. 
Wilson ave. 
Wilton 
Winchester 
Windom 
Windsor road 
Windsor 
Windsor 
Winslow ave. 
Winter 

Winter Hill cir. 
Winthrop ave. 
Wisconsin ave. 
Woodbine 
Woodbine Ex. 
Woods ave. 
Woodstock 
•Woodstock 

(Extension) 
Wyatt circle 
Wyatt 



Porter st. 
Central st. 
Elm St. 
Cambridge 
Broadway 
Lowell St. 
Broadway 
Elm St. 
Willow ave. 



Public 
From To or 

Private 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

College ave. Clifton st. Public. 

College ave. Holland st. Public. 

Broadway Northeasterly Private. 

Mystic ave. Middlesex ave. Private. 

Broadway Penn. ave. Public. 

Centre st. Westerly Private. 

End of above Lowell st. Private. 

North St. Alewife Brk Pkypublic. 

Victoria st. Alewife brook Public. 

Victoria st. Tannery st. 

CExt'n.) Private. 

Wyatt St. around to Wyatt st. Private. 
Concord ave. Lincoln pkway Public 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Northwesterly 

Sycamore st. 

Broadway 
line South st. 

B. & L. R. R. 

Hinckley st. 

Medford line 

Summer st. 

Hancock st. 
Cambridge Line Northerly 
End of above Fitchburg R. R 



30 

40 
50 
25 
20 
35 
40 
40 
40 
40 
27 
40 
30 
25 
40 
50 
30 
35 
40 
40 to 

40 
20 
40 



427 
3,534 
125 
307 
470 

'366 

575 

40 

490 

1.123 

402 



499 



1,149 
32 403 



IS4 



65 



496 



177 
583 

"46i 
212 



920 
315 



Yorktown 
Yorktown 



Cambridge line N. E. line 

N E line Malvern ave. Public. 40 

Maivern ave. Northerly Private. 40 



294 



100 



Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 
Court 



39 Adams st. Southeasterly 
Albion St. Central st. 

11 Albion St. Northeasterly 
21 Albion st. Northeasterly 
292 Broadway Southwesterly 
612 Broadway Southwesterly 
Buena Vista rd.Easterly 
Cambria st. Northerly 

12 Carlton st. Southeasterly 

112 Central st. Northwesterly 

113 Central st. Southeasterly 
227 Columbia st. Northwesterly 
Conlon ct. Windsor st. ex. 
36 Craigie st. Westerly 



Easterly 
Easterly 
Southwesterly 



■Proposed. 



59 Craigie st. 
58 Dane st. 
20 Dimick st. 
91 Franklin st. W^esterly 
35 Lexing-tonave Northerly 
66 Lowell St. Westerly 
78 Lowell St. Westerly 
101 Medford st. Easterly 
335 Somervilleav Northerly 
10 Stone ave. Northwesterly 
Windst>r st. ex. E'ly and W'ly 
Washington ave Franklin st. 
Ii\-ington rd. Boston ave. 
Total 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



8 
12 

9 
10 
15 
20 
15 

9 
25 
10 
20 
10 
20 
25 

23.63 
10 

39.25 
12 
21 
25 
25 

8 
15 
20 
20 

6 
20 



460.215 



90 
216 

178 
100 

90 
188 
145 

59 

75 
168 
150 
117 
240 
126 
129 

70 
136 
171 

90 
101 
101 

75 

60 
113 
370 

95 

157 

76,210 



Public. S7.16 miles [includes 1.406 miles of City Boulevard and Park 
Roadways, 2.331 miles of State Boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), 

and 1.596 miles State Highway]; private 14.43. 

Total length of streets in the city, 101.59 miles. 



o-JrO AXNIAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



City Hall, Sonierville, January 1, 1925. 
To the Honorable, The Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, 
I submit herewith the aniuial report of the public buildings 
department for the year en<ling December 31, 1924. 

The total valuation of the property which is in the 
custody of the public buildinos department is approximately 
|4,586,'000'.0(). 

The total expenditures for the year 1924 for the care and 
maintenance of this property was |241 ,920.68. 

This amount was expended as follows: 

















Care an 


(1 








.Jaiiito; 


r.s 


Pue! 


I 


T.ight 




Repairs 


Total 


I 


School Bldgs. 


$69,431 


00 $38,702 


45 $10,961 


93 


$52,060 


42 $171,155 


80 


Municipal Bldgs. 


5,561 


73 


356 


89 


884 


07 


7,182 


47 


12,985 


16 


Polling Places 
Police Bldgs. 










18 


69 


1,589 


28 


1,607 


97 


2,168 


58 


1,078 


01 


873 


87 


955^ 


70 


5,076 


16 


Fire Bldgs. 


1,562 


65 


3,649 


57 


3,505 


17 


1,510 


37 


10,227 


76 


Electrical Bldgs. 


1,217 


93 


653 


82 


45 


24 




50 


1,917 


49 


Contagious Hosp. 


406 


05 


1,435 


20 


473 


29 


1,356 


41 


3,669 


95 


Sewer Bldgs. 


10 


36 


86 


50 


97 


68 


47 


62 


242 


16 


Sanitary Bldgs. 


34 


44 


77 


00 


232 


32 


626 


40 


970 


16 


Highway Bldgs. 


74 


98 


1,050 


29 


253 


21 


1,073 


94 


2,452 


42 


City Home Bldgs. 


864 


94 


1,877 


44 


607 


15 


711 


90 


3,561 


43 


Central Library 


.3,339 


63 


1,043 


86 


1,493 


18 


6,458 


54 


12,335 


21 


W. Br'ch Library 


1,481 


29 


600 


54 


280 


75 


281 


83 


2,644 


41 


E. Br'ch Library 


1,221 


29 


487 


15 


133 


42 


237 


10 


2,078 


96 


Union Sq Library 


1,221 


29 


559 


48 


234 


96 


139 


18 


2,154 


91 


Park Bldgs. 


378 


00 


418 


98 


221 


97 


1,000 


52 


2,019 


47 


Bathouse 


1,227 


28 










1,324 


47 


2,551 


75 


Bandstand 


140 
718 


61 
54 










155 
1,259 


54 
03 


296 
2,983 


15 


Water Bldgs. 


536 


43 


469 


36 


36 



Totals $90,559 59 $52,613 61 $20,786 26 $77,971 22 $241,920 68 

Inspection of Buildings 

The Commis>sioner of Public Buildings is also the in- 
si)ector of buildings according to the terms of the charter and 
as such during the past year has made over 3600 formal in- 
spections of buildings in the process of construction. 



C0MMiS8i()xn:k OF ri r.Lic iuildings. 



Ul 



The followiiijjj table shows the iiiiinber of permits issued 
for building operations during tlie year 1924 : — 











WARDS 








Ruildiii.qs 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Totals 


Dwellings 


44 


54 


34 


29 


67 


87 


81 


396 


Stores 


8 


7 


8 


3 


6 


14 


9 


55 


Dwellings & Stores 


7 


4 


1 


5 


3 


2 


3 


25 


Garages 


43 


42 


28 


32 


74 


71 


196 


486 


Storage 


1 


8 




1 


2 


2 


2 


16 


Manufactories . 


1 


.... 




1 


2 


,.,, 


•••• 


4 


Sheds 


6 


10 




1 


2 


4 


3 


26 


Offices 


,,,, 


1 




1 


' .... 


2 


2 


6 


Stables 


1 






.... 


.... 




.... 


1 


Churches 


.... 


1 




.... 


1 


.... 


1 


3 


Gasoline Stations 


1 






2 


.... 






4 


Restaurant 


1 






1 






1 


3 


Dance Hall 


1 


.... 




.... 


1 


.... 


.... 


2 


Shops 


1 


3 




3 






2 


10 


Open Air Markets 


2 












1 


3 


Theaters 




1 








.... 


• •■• 


1 


Laundry 




1 






2 


.... 


1 


4 


Salesrooms 






1 






.... 


1 


2 


Court House 






1 




.... 


.... 




1 


Bakery 






.... 




.... 


1 


.... 


1 


Hospital 






.... 




.... 


1 




1 


Miscellaneous 


2 








1 


1 


2 


6 


Torn Down 


4 


6 


4 


1 


6 


4 


2 


27 


Totals 


123 


138 


78 


. 80 


167 


190 


307 


1,083 








Wood 




Fire-resisting 




Totals 


New Buildings 
Alterations 






133 
373 




535 
23 






668 
396 



506 



558 



1064 



WARDS 



Building's 
Wood 

Wood and Stucco . 
Fire-protected Wood 
Brick . 

Brick and Concrete 
Brick and Wood . 
Brick, Concrete & Wood 
Brick and Stone . 
Brick & Stucco Wood 
Cement Blocks 
Cement Block & Brick 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 Totals 


66 


86 


44 


38 


79 


101 


91 


505 


1 


1 






.... 


• •■• 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 




1 




1 


11 


7 


4 


7 


5 


5 


5 


10 


43 


1 


1 




.... 


2 


1 


.... 


5 


2 


1 




.... 


1 
1 


5 

i 


2 
3 


10 
1 
4 
1 


35 


36 


19 


34 


65 


67 


171 


427 


.... 


...• 


1 


2 


1 


2 


4 


10 



342 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WARDS 

Buildings 12 3 4 5 6 7 Totals 

Cement Block & Wood 1 i 

Concrete .... 3 2 1 .... 5 1 7 19 

Concrete & Cement Block . ' 2 2 

Steel 3 4 3 1 7 6 15 39 

Sheet Iron 112 



Totals .... 123 138 78 80 167 190 307 1083 

The number of plumbing permits issued during 1924 was . 452 

Number of permits for plumbing in new buildings . . . 155 

Number of permits for plumbing in old buildings . . . 297 

Number of buildings in which soil pipes were tested . . 368 

The total estimated cost of new biiiJdiiigs and altera- 
tions dnring the year 192-t was 13,604,730.00, Avliile the esti- 
mated cost in 1023 was 13,185,350.00, showing: an increase of 
1419,374.00. 

The total nnnd)er of ])ermits issued during the year 1924, 
viz 1083, was 41 more than during the year 1923, when 1042 
permits for new buildings and alterations were issued, show- 
ing an increase of 4 per cent. 

There has been considerable speculative building of 
dwellings going on this year, or to be exact there were permits 
issued for 118 new buildings housing 425 families. 

Single family houses have been altered into two family 
houses and some of the larger houses have been altered into 
small kitchenette suites. These types of alteration demand 
very careful inspection and supervision by this department 
and entail considerable more time than new construction. 

On September 1, 1918, the Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Somerville passed an ordinance requiring a fee to be col- 
lected for every building permit issued by this department. 
In accordance with this, fees collected for building permits 
during the year 1924 amounted to |3227.00. 

The Commissioner has under his charge and direction 
the work of maintenance and upkeep of the eighty-four public 
buildings of this City and the grounds in connection there- 
with, all janitors in the City's employ, a force of mechanics 
who perform the w^ork of keeping the buildings in repair, the 
inspection of installation and care of all elevators, the super- 
vision of construction of all new municipal buildings, the 
maintenance of the public bathing beach and public municipal 
baths in the Bennett and Bingham Schools, and Lincoln Park. 

The various activities in connection with the department 
work require a vast amount of time and attention in order 
to keep the property in proper condition for occupancy. 



rOMMISSlOXER OF ITRMC BTJII.DINGS. 343 

Coal 

As in the past years an invitation was sent out Tor bids 
lor supplying the necesvsary tonnage of both Anthracite and 
Kituminons coal for the city bnildings for the winter of 1924 
and the spring of 1925. 

The contract for both bituniinons and anthracite coal 
was given to the Metropolitan Coal Company of Boston. 

The above firm fnrnished a chemical analysis of the coal 
which they agreed to snpply. A sample from each delivery 
was sent to the Arthur D. Little Company for analysis and 
where sample di<l not e(iual the i'e<iuired analysis a credit was 
received. 

Elevators 

According to an act of the Legislature, tln^ Building 
Commissioner is required to have every elevator in the city 
inspected yearly, and a report of the conditions and necessary 
repairs made to tl»e Public Safety Department, State House, 
Boston. 

Plans and specifications of all new installations of ele- 
vators must be filed in this office and certificates of approval 
granted by the Commissioner. 

During the year 1924, there were 120 elevators inspected 
and 31 orders for repairs were sent out to concerns, covering 
63 elevators. 

School Buildings 

The maintenance and care of the school buildings has, 
as formerly^ demanded the most vigilant attention from this 
department and the appropriation made for that puryjose I 
believe has been expended carefully and judiciously. 

Every year, before the summer vacation arrives, this de- 
partment sends out a blank to be filled in by both the princi- 
pals and janitors of the school buildings for all requisition* 
and repairs needed. 

These repairs and requests are taken up wdth the SupeT- 
intendent of Schools, and taken care of in the order which he 
suggests so far as the appropriation will allow. 

First are taken into consideration the requests and re- 
pairs absolutely needed for the opening of schools in the Fall. 
Then the others are taken up in the order of their importance. 



34-i AXNIAL UKI'OliTS. 

This ill itself is a huge task as tlie waiit« of cnery section innst 
be taken into consideration. 

This department is pleased to announce the opening of 
tlie new Leonard B. Cliandler School Biiildino known as the 
Northern Eastern .hinior High School. The Commissioner 
is justly proud of this school building, it being the only school 
building of stricth' first class construction in the city. 

It contains thirty-four class rooms, shops, etc. and an 
ass(»mbly liall with a seating capacity of 1)00 on the floor and 
300 in the balcony. 

There is also a large dining hall and kitchen where food 
supplied to teachers and pupils is prepared and served. This 
school also contains a model suite where domestic science of 
the home is taught. 

The entire building is equipped with the latest arrange- 
ments in schoolhoiise electric lighting, and fixtures are of 
the most modern type. 

Complete showerbath arrangements have been installed 
for both boys and girls, and are equipped with the latest non- 
scalding arrangements and operated by the jittending teachers. 

The heating plant is separate from the school building 
and is equipped with the latest in air washers and air circu- 
lating arrangements. This insures each pupil receiving the- 
full amount of clean air at the recpiired temperature per min- 
ute. The air is taken from the outside ])assiiig through air 
washer, Avhich rcanoves all impurities and dust, to the large 
fan which forces the air through the ducts to the class rooms. 

The auditorium is equipped with a moving picture booth 
enclosing a moving picture machine, a spot light machine and 
a rewinding machine. 

This school building is one of the most up to date build- 
ings in the state. 

The opening of the new Leonard B. Chandler building 
necessitated considerable changes in the Forster, Folsom, 
Southworth and Prescott School buildings formerly' occupied 
hj the Northern Junior High and Eastern Junior Higli 
Schools. 

At the Forster School new furniture was installed of a 
size suitable for the smaller grades now occupying this build- 
ing. 

The Folsom building was turned over to the Continua- 
tion School and fuiniture installed suitable for their work. 

The closing of eight rooms in the Edgerl}' School owing 
to the rearrangement of pupils gave us furniture which was 
installed in the Southworth building. 

New furniture was required to equip the Pn^scott School 
building owing to sij&e and age of pupils. 



C0MMISSI().\K1{ OF rri'.LIC i:ilLI)IX(iS. J>45 

Tho removal of the (Continuation School from High 
School bnildinj^ caused several chan<»es to be made in this 
jschool as well as new furniture to be purchased. 

Owing to the sale of the house known as the Annie Mc- 
Carthy Center, on Maple Street the Commissioner fitted up> 
rooms in the basement of the Bennett School where this valu- 
able work is now carried on. 

This department lias lifted u]> a new denial laboiatory. 
waiting and milk i-oom in the basement of the Knapp School' 
building on the Adrian Street side. This will take care of a 
much needed want in this district. 

Tlie High School Auditorium, known as the Chiyton Ellis 
Auditorium, has been thoroughly renovated during the past 
summer. Part of the side and front walls and rear of stage 
have been paneled with oak paneling, and walls and ceiling 
tinted. The hall now is in good shape and the work done 
has met with the approval of teachers and students. 

HEATJNii 

The Commissioner would recommend a system of heat 
control be put into the High School, also direct radiation in- 
stalled in that part of High School known as tlie Latin Annex. 
The installation of this equipment would mean a great sav- 
ing of coal as well as avoiding overheated class rooms. 

Also the installation of a steam heating system at the 
Moi-se School doing away with the seven anticpiated furnaces. 
now in use. 

SCHOOL YARDS 

The resurfacing of the school yards is another problem 
of importance to this department. 

The yard of the Leonard B. Chandler School on Bradley 
street side has been entirely resurfaced making a clear, dry,, 
smooth yard for play. A lawn h'as been laid on the Marshall 
Street side and is fairly well started. 

The grounds of the Shaw playground in the rear of the* 
Zebedee E. Cliff school has been graded and a wall put in on. 
the Broadway side and part of the side on Paulina street. 

Fire Department Buildings 

There have been numerous repaii-s ami improvements 
made in the fire buildings of the city. 

I urgently recommend that Engine No. Four building be re- 
placed by a new one as it is in such bad shape that it does not seem 
wise to spend much on repairs. As a fire station is needed in this 



^46 ANNUAL REl'ORTS. 

vicinity, I recommend that this station be torn down and a new one 
built on less valuable, land, and this lot sold for commercial purposes. 
IVIuch of the material in the old building could be made use of in a new 
one. 

Municipal Buildings 

The completion of the remodelcHl City Hall lias given this , 
City a much needed building. We now have a modern fire 
protected structure of very pleasing architecture with com- 
modious offices and large vault spaces. This building will 
house all departments with the exception of the School depart- 
ment which is at present in City Hall Annex. 

The building is modern in every way, of fii'st class con- 
struction, and built at much less cost than a new building. 

Each office is alloted considerable more space than they 
had in the old quarters to allow for growing conditions. 

The Commissioner has purchased much new vault equip- 
ment. New furniture has been supplied where needed. Every 
office has been fitted with a new counter, either metal or wood 
as the head of each department desired. All old office equip- 
ment has been repaired and refinishd making the furniture 
of each office look like new material. 

The removing of the several offices from their temporary 
quarters back to City Hall, and the fitting up of same has 
meant considerable work to the Commissioner and his depart- 
ment. 

Libraries 

The interior of the Central Library has been thoroughly 
repainted and redecorated. The appearance is such that it 
has called forth many favorable comments from both Library 
Trustees and the public. 

The interior of the West Somerville Branch and the 
Union Square Branch Libraries are in such a condition that 
the Commissioner hopes to be able to thoroughly renovate 
them this year. 

Water, Highway and Sanitary Buildings 
W^ATEK BUILDINGS 

Many needed repairs have been made to these buildings 
and they are now in good shape. 

A new storage building has been completed for the stor 
age of valves, hydrants and other fittings. The completion 
of tliis building supplies a long felt want in the Water depart- 
ment. 



COMMISSIONER OF ITHLIC BUI LDrXGS. 'Ml 

Hospital 

The tuberculosis camp which has been closed for several 
years was reopened this year for a Preventorium. Many re- 
pairs were needed to the plumbing system, and new screens 
were fitted to the piazza. The interior of the building was 
painted and tinted, and building put in first class condition 
so that it may be used another year for the same purposes. 

In the Contagious Disease Hospital many needed repairs 
have been made and the Commissioner hopes to be able to 
paint a great deal of the interior of the hospital this year. 

City Home 

Many much needed repairs have been completed on this 
building during the past yeai*. The interior of both mens' 
and womens' dormitories were thoroughly renovated. The 
matrons quarters papered and i)ainted. 

I would recommend the removal of the old wooden fence 
along the boulevard and the substitution of a chain link wire 
fence which would make a more sightly fence on this much 
travelled roadway. 

* 

Police Buildings 

The removal of the Courthouse to the new building now 
nearing completion on Walnut Street will necessitate many 
changes in this building if it is retained. 

The Commissioner questions whether it would not be 
more profitable to build a new model station in a more central 
part of the city than to thoroughly renovate this old structure. 
The present building is in a very bad condition, and a careful 
study is necessary to adequately plan this building to satisfy 
the growing need of this very essential department. 

Bath House 

The public bathhouse on the Mystic River at Wellington 
Bridge was opened and maintained as usual this year with a 
good attendance. 

About 150 tons of sand were purchased for resanding 
the beach. 



348 ANNUAL KBrORTS. 

This particular recreation has been a great help to many 
mothei's and children during the hot weather of the past seas- 
on. It is a common sight to see mothers and children arriv- 
ing at the beach as early as 9 o'clock Avith their lunches to 
spend the entire day. 

The attendance at the beach during the warm weather 
has sometimes exceeded 1000 a day. 

In General 

The Building Commissioner has had the co-operation of 
all branches of the City Government, including His Honor, the 
Mayor, the honorable member's of the Board of Aldermen and 
all the city officials, and desires to thank them for their kindly 
consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gborgb L. Dudley^ 
Oommissioner of PuMio Buildings. 



ELECT RIC LINES AND LIGHTS. :H9 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC 
LINES AND LIGHTS 



Somerville, Mass. 

January 1, 1925. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and tlie Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Sonierville. 

Gentlemen : — 

I most respectfnlly snbmit my sixteenth annual report 
as Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights for the year 
ending December ^^>1, 1924. 



Inspection of Wiring in Buildings 

The inspecting of interior wiring for light, heat and 
power is a very important part of the work of the electrical 
department and every effort has been made to have all instal- 
lations of electric wiring done in a safe and workmanlike 
manner. 

The greater percentage of electrical contractors and wire- 
men co-operate with the inspection department bnt there are 
some of the incompetent and careless workmen who cause 
considerable trouble. L'napproved wiring and attachments 
and over-fused cut-outs ai-e to be carefully considered as many 
lires are directly traced to such conditions. 

Having work done by unlicensed wiremen is another 
source of danger as no permit to do work can be issued to 
such men and consecpiently no inspection is called for by them. 

With the increased use of electricity for lighting, heat- 
ing and power great care should be exercised to have every- 
thing u]) to the standard of safety. 

Flat irons, washing machines, stoves and heaters must 
be on separate circuits and not attached to lighting fixtures. 
If this rule is followed the consumer will not have to call in 
a repair man so often. 



350 



ANNFAL REPORTS. 



Number of notifications of new work 
Number of inspections of new work 
Number of re-inspections of new work . 
Number of inspections of old work . 
Number of defective installations of old work 
Number of defective installations remedied 
Number of re-inspections of old work 
Total number of inspections 
Number of permits issued to the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Co. for installing meters, lamps, 
etc. ......... 



3003 

4801 

459 

30 

10 

10 

10 

5310 



6291 



Fire Alarm System 

The Fire Alarm System is in excellent condition but 
some of the older apparatus should be replaced. 

826 bell alarms liave been received and transmitted dur- 
ing the year. 

937 telephone calls for fire were received and fire depart- 
ment sent. 

8 A. 1). T. alarms were received and transmitted. 

The central oftico equipment consists of the following: 



2 6 circuit operating boards. 

1 — 5 circuit tapper board. 

1 — 5 circuit gong board. 

2—16 circuit storage battery charging boards. 

1-32 circuit protector board. 

1-12 circuit automatic repeater. 

1 — dial, 4 number manual transmitter. 

2 — 5 circuit punching registers. 

13 punching registers and take up reels. 

2 automatic time and date stamps. 

1 master clock. 

940 cells storage battery. 

5 — 10 foot 4 shelf batterj'^ racks. 

4 metropolitan tappers and 2 gongs. 



The api)aratus outside the central ofiice consists of the 
following: 

134 signal boxes. 
7 tower strikers. 
45 gongs. 

10 punching registers. 
20 tappers. 
8 private telephones. 



About 581/2 uiilei? of overhead wires and 80 miles of un- 
derground wires. One new box has been installed No. 454 



ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. ^>^)l 

Powder House Boulevard corner Dow Street and one box No. 
113 has been discontinued. 

I),000 feet of new overhead wive has been run and 17,30(1 
feet of ohl wire removed. 

9,925 feet of underground cable was installed. 

Police Signal System 

The police Signal System is now about 12 years old and 
begins to show signs of wear and some of the apparatus will 
have to be replaced. 

. Some trouble has been found with signal boxes but ser- 
vice has not often been interrupted. 

A Dumber of boxes have been overhauled and parts re- 
placed. 

A new register and time stamp for the signal desk is 
necessary. 

The system consists of the following : 



1 — 4 circuit police desk. 

About 191/^ miles of overhead wire. 

4 special boxes. 

59 street signal boxes. 

About 14l^ miles of underground cable. 



Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets 

The same attention has been given to the condition of 
poles and wires on the streets as in previous years. A num- 
ber of defective poles have been replaced by the companies 
owning same. 

New poles have been placed in locations granted for the 
purpose of supplying lighting and telephone service andl 
abandoned poles have been removed. 



New Re- Re- Re- 

poles placed moved set 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Company ...... 5 9 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co. . . 98 51 4 11 

Boston Elevated Railway Company .322 
Postal Telegraph Company ... 2 

Permits given to the New England 

Tel. & Tel. Co. for attachments 

to the Edison Company's poles . 100 
Permits given to the Edison Electric 

111. Co. for attachments to the New 

England Tel. & Tel. Company's 

poles 75 



o52 ANNUAL REI'ORTS. • 

Street Lighting 

A iniiiibev of \ww lights liav(» been added and some have 
been clianged. The lights on Medford Street from Gilman 
Square to Magonn S(|nare have been changed from 600 C. P. 
to 1000 C. P. and inonnted on nnderground posts as the entire 
street is to be cleared of overhead wirevS. 

The ninnber of street lights Jannarv 1, 192~> are as fol- 
lows : 

182 Magnetite lights. 
20 —1000 C. P. lights. 
383— 600 C. P. lights. 
129— 125 C. P. lights. 
5)86— 60 C. P. lights. 



Recommendation 

1 respectfully rcconnnend that one assistant inspector 
he employed to enable the department to more thoroughly 
<-over all new and old installations of electrical wiring in the 
City. This is imperative as the work cannot be done by one 
man. 



Conclusion 

I w^sli to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members of 
the Board of Aldermen and the several departments for the 
many courtesies received. 

Respectfully yours, 

Walter T. Fuller, 
ConDnlsuloncr of ElcA'trw Lines arid Lights. 



riTY CLKKK 






REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 



Office of thk City Glerk^ 
January 1, 1925. 

To the Honorable, tlio Mayor and tlie Board of Aldermen: — ■ 

Gentlemen : — The following- is i-espectfully submitted as 
the tifty-lhird nnnnal re|)ort of the city clerk of the City 
of Somerville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1924. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — - 



Receipts 

Balance from year 1923 being" for dog li- 
censes issued in December 1923 

7 males at $2.00 

1 female at $5.00 . . . . 
1 spayed at $2.00 . . . . 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 
treasurer, 9 @ $.20 . . . . 



For dog" licenses issued in 1924: — 
783 males at $2.00 
195 females at $5.00 
100 spayed at $2.00 
3 kennel at $25.00 



For hunting and fishing licenses isstied 
in 1924: — 
147 hunting and fishing at $2.00 . 
164 hunting and trapping at $1.50 . 
5 alien hunting and trapping at 

$15.00 .... 

2 trapping at $.25 
206 fishing at $1.00 

4 alien fishing at $2.00 . 
1 non-resident fishing at $2.00 



Recording mortgages, assignments, etc. 
864 papers ...... 

Certificates of marriage intentions, — 

1283 licenses and 1 duplicate 
Furnishing copies of records . 

Carried forward ...... 



$14 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


21 


00 


1 


80 


1,566 


00 


975 


00 


200 


00 


75 


00 



294 


00 


246 


00 


75 


00 




50 


206 


00 


8 


00 


2 


00 



1,236 68 

1,284 00 

330 25 

$2,850 98 



$19 20 



2,816 00 



831 50 



3.666 70 



354 AN NT' AT. REPORTS 

Brought forward $2,850 93 $3,666 70 

Licenses: — 

Auctioneers, 33 licenses at $2.00 . . 66 00 

Billiard and pool tables and bowling 
alleys, 162 licenses for 104 tables 
and 58 alleys including 1 table 
granted in 1923 at $2.00 . . . 324 00 

Drain layers, 6 licenses at $1.00 . . 6 00 

Drivers, 96 at $1.00 .... 96 00 

Engines and motors, — 

17 licenses for 12 motors, 3 boilers 
and 2 engines including 1 boiler 
and 2 motors granted in 1923 at 
$1.00 17 00 

Garages 187 licenses including 11 

granted in 1923 at $2.00 . . 374 00 
Gasoline tanks. 52 licenses including 

4 granted in 1923 at $1.00 ... 52 00 

Hackney carriages, 259 at $1.00 . . 259 00 

Intelligence offices, 5 at $2.00 ... 10 00 

Junk and second hand licenses, — 

2S licenses including 3 granted in 

1923 at $10 280 00 

17 licenses including 2 granted in 

1923 at $25 425 00 

Liquor licenses (third class) 24 includ- 
ing 1 granted in 1923 at $1.00 . . 24 00 
Lodging house licenses, 49 including 2 

granted in 1923 at $2.00 ... 98 00 

Second hand auto licenses, 38 including 

2 granted in 1923 at $25.00 . 
Slaughtering, 7 at $1.00 .... 
Street Musicians, 4 at $.50 
Victualler licenses, 73 at $2.00 ... 
Wagons, 63 at $1.00 . . . . ' 
Wagon stands, 15 at $1.00 . 
License to operate motor busses 1 at 

$25.00 

Storage of rags 1 at $1.00 . 

Permits for projections over sidewalks, 

49 permits for 11 electric signs, 15 

stationary signs, 6 swing arms, 1 

swinging sign, 5 awnings, 1 coal 

hole, 1 revolving barber pole and 1 

marquee including 1 electric sign 

granted in 1923 at $1.00 . 

Filing Certificates 9 at $.50 
Interest on deposits ..... 

Badges 

Witness fees ....... 

Physicians' Registration, 9 at $.25 . 

Miscellaneous 5 88 6,182 71 

Total receipts . . 9,849 41 



950 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 


146 


00 


63 


00 


15 


00 


25 


00 


1 


00 



49 


00 


4 


50 


19 


40 


4 


75 


6 


00 


2 


25 


5 


88 



CITY CLKRK. 



355 



Payments 

To Charles E. Hatfield, county treasurer, 
June 1 and December 1, receipts for 
dog licenses from December 1, 1923 to 
November 30, 1924, both inclusive 

778 males at $2.00 

195 females at $5.00 . . . . 

100 spayed at $2.00 

3 kennels at $25.00 . . . . 



Less city clerk's fees, 1,076 at $.20 



$1,556 


00 


975 


00 


200 


00 


- 75 


00 


2,806 


00 


215 


20 



2,590 80 



2,590 80 



To the Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Game, for licenses for hunting and fish- 
ing in 1924,— 

147 hunting and fishing at $2.00 . 
164 hunting and trapping at $1.50 

5 alien hunting and trapping at 
$15.00 . ' . 

2 trapping at $.25 
206 fishing at $1.00 

4 alien fishing at $2.00 

1 non-resident fishing at $2.00 



Less city clerk's fees 287 at $.15 and 

242 at $.25 



294 


00 


246 


00 


75 


00 




50 


206 


00 


8 


00 


2 


00 


831 


50 


103 


55 



727 95 



To the city treasurer, monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and record- 
ing dog licenses, 1081 at $.20 . 
City clerk's fees for issuing and record- 
ing fishing and hunting licenses 287 at 

$.15 and 242 at $.25 

All the receipts above specified except 
for dog licenses and hunting and fish- 
ing licenses 

Total payments 

Balance, January 1, 1925, being for dog 
licenses issued in December, 1924: — 



12 


males 


at 


$2.00 . 


$24 


00 


1 


female 


at 


$5.00 . 


5 


00 


1 


spayed 


at 


$2.00 . 


2 


00 



less city clerk's fees i)aid to 
the city treasurer 14 ai $.20 



31 00 



2 80 



216 


20 


103 


55 


6,182 


71 



6,502 46 
9,821 21 



28 20 



9,849 41 



356 ANNUAL REl'ORTS 

Licenses and Permits 

BesidevS the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of 

receipts, licenses and permits have heen granted by the Board 
of Aldermen, without charge, as follows : — 

Children under fifteen to take part in entertainments 4 

Operate whippet tank ........ 1 

Parade in streets, with music, etc. .... 11 

To hold religious services in streets and squares . 1 

To hold fireworks ......... 1 

Newsboys .......... 13 

To move buildings through streets .... 4 



Births 
1924 

Number of birtlus i-eportc^d bv physicians and midwives 
for 1924 

Males 1089 

Females 952 

2041 

A canvass of the city is at present being made under the 
direction of the city clerk as required by section 5, chapter 
29, of the Revised Laws, to ascertain the facts required for 
record relative to children born during the year. 

As the information derived from such canvass will not 
be available in time sufficient for its incorporation in this 
report, a statement in full of the births of 1924 will be given 
in the city clerk's report for the year 1925. 



1923 

Tlie following is a statement iii full of the births for 1923. 

Number of births (exclusive of still births) in Somerville 

in 1923 registered 1,955 

Males 996 

Females 959 

1.955 



Born of American parents .... 875 

Born of foreign parents 676 

Born of American father and foreign mother 182 
Born of foreign father and American mother . 208 
Born of American mother and father un- 
known nationality ..... 17 
Born of foreign mother and father of un- 
known nationality 2 



1.955 



CITY TLEKK, 



^57 



Number of still-births in Somerville in 1923 as registered 
Number of births in other places in 1923 registered . 
Number of cases of twins 



88 

6S6 

26 



Marriages 

Number of intention certificates issued in 1924 

(Same as previous year) 

Marriages registered ./ . . . 

Less than previous year . 

Both parties American 

Both parties foreign .... 

American groom and foreign bride 

Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriage of ... . 

Second marriage of . 

Third marriage of ... . 

Fourth marriage of . 



770 
240 
133 
143 



Deaths 
(Exclusive of still-births) 



2,245 

306 

19 

2 



1,285 

1,286 
100 



1,286 



1,286 c'pls 



Number of deaths in Somerville in 1924 
Less than previous year . 

Males 

Females 



Under ten years of age . 
10 and under 20 years of age 
20 and under 30 years of age 
30 and under 40 years of age 
40 and under 50 years of age 
50 and under 60 years of age 
60 and under 70 years of age 
70 and under 80 years of age 
80 and under 90 years of age 
90 years of age and over . 



Age of oldest person deceased 

Born in Somerville . 

Born in other places in the United States 

Of foreign birth 

Birthplace unknown 



443 
536 







159 






27 






42 






44 






68 






125 






191 






206 






»9 






18 


99 years 




. 


180 


i States 


430 


. . 


366 


• 




3 



979 
129 



979 



979 



979 



358 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Number of deaths in January 






98 


Number of deaths in February- 






84 


Number of deaths in March 






9« 


Number of deaths in April 






91 


Number of deaths in May 






99 


Number of deaths in June 






68 


Number of deaths in July 






80 


Number of deaths in August . 






57 


Number of deatfis in September 






66 


Number of deaths in October . 






72 


Number of deaths in November 






82 


Number of deaths in December 






92 



979 



The number of still-births during the year was seventy- 
six. Tn addition to the above, 254 deaths which occurred 
elsewhere were recorded in Somerville, almost the entire num- 
ber of persons deceased having been residents of this city. 



CITY (M.EKK 



359 



Liquor License Question. 

The followiug is a statement of the votes, during the sev- 
eral years of its submission to the people, on the question of 
granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors (and cer- 
tain non-intoxicating beverages) in this city, together with 
the number of registered voters and the estimated population 
for each year: — 



Ykak. 


Yks. 


No. 


Hl.ANK. 


REGISTERKI) 

Voters. 


! 

j E8XIMATBD 

! Population. 


1881 


979 


1,222 




3,678 


26, (XX) 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3,778 


26,500 


1883 


767 


1 ,343 




4,407 


27,0(X) 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4,470 


28,000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3,969 


*29,992 


1886 


214 


1,321 




4,089 


32,000 


1887 


000 


2,427 




4,574 


34,000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5,399 


36,000 


1889 


63^) 


1,706 


33^") 


5,286 


39,000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5,556 


*40,117 


1891 


1 1,054 


2,598 


279 


5,938 


43,000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 


:^7 


7,587 


46,000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7,943 


48,000 


1894 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8,007 


50,000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8,410 


*52,200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9,379 


54,000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


48f) 


8,925 


56,000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8,6,57 


57,.5(X) 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8,838 


(X),00() 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9,620 


*6 1,643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9,499 


63,500 


1902 


1,645, 


3,242 


360 


10,100 


65,000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11,346 


67,000 


1904 


2,022 


4,338 


447 


11,682 


69,500 


1905 


2,483 


4,660 


531 


11,340 


*69,272 


1906 


2,193 


5,204 


582 


11,571 


70,000 


1907 


1,735 


4,591 


459 


11,558 


74,0(X) 


1908 


1,780 


4,760 


491 


12,777 


75,500 


1909 


1,830 


4,601 


530 


12,479 


75,500 


1910 


1,544 


3,968 


365 


12,522 


*77,236 


1911 


2,193 


4,841 


492 


13,226 


80,000 


1912 


2,421 


6,182 


54() 


13,854 


81,000 


1913 


2,348 


6,431 


550 


13,417 


82,000 


1914 


2,178 


5,535 


488 


13,404 


85,000 


1915 


l,7a5 


5,262 


379 


13,8a5 


*86,854 


1916 


1,100 


4,158 


271 


14,500 


88,000 


1917 


1,291 


3,457 


232 


13,826 


90,000 


1918 


690 


1,935 


161 


13,477 


90, ,500 


1919 


2,777 


2,297 


261 


14,810 


91,000 


1920 








27,307 


♦93,091 


1921 


5,143 


8,751 


2,992 


27,545 


95,000 


1922 


i 








96,000 


1923 


7,266 


9,822 


4,382 


28,149 


97,000 


1924 


i 


1 






98,000 


*C«iuii; 


m. 











360 ANM'AL KEi'ORTS. 



ORDINANCES 

Somenille, January 1, 1925. 

The following ordinances have been adopted since the 
printing of the annual rei)orts for the year 1923 : — 

(Ordinances Nos. 104, 106, 107, 108 and 109) 



ORDINANCE NO. 104 

An Ordinance Relative to the Salary of the Mayor. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville 
as follows: — 

Section 1. The salary of the Mayor shall hereafter be at the rate 
of five thousand dollars a year beginning with the next municipal year, 
to wit. the municipal year nineteen hundred and twenty-four. 

Section 2. The Ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved January 5, 1924. 

ORDINANCE NO. 106 

An Ordinance establishing Dover and Day Streets as One Way 
Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the city of Somerville, 
as follows: — 

Section 1. No person shall cause or allow a vehicle other than 
a vehicle propelled by hand to pass along any portion of Dover street 
except in a southwesterly direction or along any portion of Day street 
except in a northeasterly direction. 

Section 2. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance shall 
be liable to a penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect May 15, 1924. 

Approved May 5, 1924. 

ORDINANCE NO. 107 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somerville 
as follows: — 

Section 1. The following orders, rules and regulations are here- 
by made and adopted relative to the transportation and carriage of 
passengers for hire by motor vehicles under the provisions of sections 
45 to 49 inclusive of chapter 159 of the General Law^s of Massachusetts. 

Section 2. Every application for a license for the transportation 
and carriage of passengers as aforesaid shall set forth the name and 
the place of residence if any, and the place of business of the applicant 
and shall designate the route over which it is desired to operate and 
the termini and rates of fare to be charged. Such route and termini 
and rates of fare may be changed only with the consent of the board 
of aldermen. 



CITY CLBRK. 361 

Section 3. A schedule of operation shall be filed with the appli- 
cation for said license and shall provide for the regular operation 
of such motor vehicle between the termini and over the route to be 
desigmated in the license. The licensee shall regularly operate such 
motor vehicle in substantial accordance with the schedule of operation, 
except in cases of accidents, breakdowns or other emergency and shall 
always operate the motor vehicle to the terminus of the route before- 
turning around and shall not operate or permit to be operated any 
motor vehicle elsewhere than on the routei stated in the license ex- 
cept in case of emergency. Nothing herein shall be construed to pro- 
hibit the operation, in addition to the service described in the schedule,, 
of special or extra trips over said route or portions thereof. 

Section 4. Every such license shall be signed by the city clerk.. 
It shall set forth the name of the person, firm or corporation receiving 
the license and the place of residence, it any, and the place of busi- 
ness of the licensee. A fee of twenty-five dollars shall be paid the 
city clerk for every such license. 

Section 5. No such license shall be issued until the licensee shall 
have deposited with the city treasurer a bond of a surety company 
approved by the city treasurer and by said board in accordance with 
the provisions of section 46 of said chapter 159. The bond shall cover 
each and every motor vehicle operated by the licensee as follows: 

For a vehicle having a seating capacity of five passengers or lesS;. 
$10,000. 

For a vehicle having a seating capacity of six or more passengers,. 
$10,000 and $1,000 additional for each passenger seat in excess of five. 

Provided however, that a bond of $25,000 shall be deemed sufficient 
to cover all the vehicles operated by any one licensee, or in lieu of 
such bond an automobile liability insurance policy of the commercial 
type accompanied by a bond of the licensee, such policy insuring pay- 
ments to the amount herein specified. 

If said board shall at any time, determine that any bond is in- 
sufficient, it may require an additional bond. 

Section 6. No person shall operate or cause to be operated a 
motor vehicle for the transportation or carriage of passengers as 
aforesaid unless said vehicle has been licensed by said board. Every 
application for such license shall set forth the name and the place 
of residence, if any, and the place of business of the owner and a 
description of the vehicle and the number of persons exclusive of the 
operator which the vehicle is to carry. The description shall state- 
the trade name of the motor vehicle, the type of body, the engine or 
motor number, the kind of power, the manufacturer's name and num- 
ber, the year of make and the length of wheel base. No vehicle shall 
be licensed until it has been inspected by or for the committee on 
licenses of said board and reported by said committee to be in its. 
opinion safe and suitable. 

Section 7. Every license for a motor vehicle shall be signed by 
the city clerk. It shall set forth the name and the place of residencev 
if any, and the place of business of the owner and a description of 
the vehicle similar to that required by section 6. A fee of ten dollars 
shall be paid the city clerk for every such license for a motor vehicle 
carrying six passengers or less exclusive of the driver and two dollars 
additional for each passenger in excess of six which the license author- 
izes the vehicle to carry, but in no case shall said license fee exceed 
twenty-five dollars. 



^2 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Section 8. The license issued for a motor vehicle shall designate 
the number of passengers, exclusive of the operator, the licensee is 
authorized to carry in said vehicle, and no person operating said 
vehicle shall cause or allow more persons to be carried thereon at 
any time than the number designated in the license or allow any 
person to stand or sit upon the running board, step, fender, dash or 
hood thereof or allow any person otherwise to ride on such motor 
vehicle outside the body thereof; provided, however, that in addition 
to the number of passengers which said motor vehicle by the terms 
of its license is permitted to carry, children under seven years of age 
may be carried therein in arms or seated on the laps of adult persons 
accompanying them, but no passenger with a child in arms or seated 
on the lap shall be permitted on any front seat of the vehicle. 

Section 9. The licensee shall not reconstruct or materially change 
a motor vehicle after the license thereof has been issued, without 
the consent of the board. 

Section 10. Change of ownership of such motor vehicle shall 
operate as a revocation of its license. 

Section 11. No person shall operate such motor vehicle on a 
public way unless he is twenty years of age or older and unless he 
shall have in his possession a license so to do from said board, which 
license shall state the name, age, height, weight, color of hair, color 
of eyes and race of the licensee, his place of residence and the name 
of his employer, if he operates such motor vehicles as an employee. 
The license shall be signed by the city clerk. A fee of one dollar 
shall be paid the city clerk for every such license. 

Section 12. Every license issued under these orders, rules and 
regulations shall be numbered in regular order as issued with a sepa- 
rate series of numbers for each kind of license. 

Section 13. No person shall operate or cause to be operated a 
motor vehicle except between such termini and over such route as 
shall be specified in the license for such motor vehicle. 

Section 14. No person operating such motor vehicle shall charge, 
demand, collect or receive a greater or less compensation for the trans- 
portation of a passenger or for any service in connection therewith 
than the rate and fare applicable thereto as specfied in the license. 

Section 15. No person shall operate or cause to be operated such 
motor vehicle without a printed sign thereon stating the principal 
streets of the route and termini of the route, the fare to be charged, 
and the license number, which sign shall be so printed and attached 
to such motor vehicle as to be plainly visible to persons on the street, 
or without a printed sign thereon showing the schedule of service 
filed at the time which sign shall be so printed and so attached to 
the vehicle as to be plainly visible to passengers entering the vehicle. 
No other sign except as above provided and the licensee's name shall be 
placed on the vehicle. 

Section 16 No person shall operate or cause to be operated such 
motor vehicle at any time between one-half hour after sunset and one- 
half hour before sunrise with the curtains closed or with the body 
of the vehicle otherwise enclosed, unless the interior of the vehicle 
is fully lighted. 

Section 17. Every such motor vehicle shall be equipped with a 
horn or other similar warning device and a speedometer, and liquid 
fire extinquisher all in serviceable condition. Every such motor ve- 
hicle shall be supplied with a set of serviceable skid chains, which 



shall be placed on the rear wheels when the vehicle is operated in any 
public way where because of snow or ice or oth^r conditions the use 
of such chains is reasonably necessary to prevent skidding. 

Section 18. No person operating" such motor vehicle shall collect 
fares or make change or take on or discharge a passenger while the 
vehicle is in motion; nor shall he have a lighted cigarette, cigar or 
pipe in his possession while any passenger is being carried there nor 
drink any intoxicating beverage or use morphine, cocaine, opium or 
other harmful drug^ of any kind, or be under the influence thereof, 
while engaged in operating the vehicle. 

Section 19. Every licensee shall immediately report fully in writ- 
ing to the city clerk and the chief of police the time, place and cause 
of any accident and of any injury to a passenger or other person or to 
property in which any motor vehicle or operator under his control is 
involved. 

Section 20. No person operating such motor vehicle shall refuse 
to carry any person offering at a regular stopping place to be carried 
as a passenger therein, unless the seats are fully occupied or unless 
such person is intoxicated or disorderly or otherwise for good reason 
objectionable. 

Section 21. No person shall operate such motor vehicles for more 
than twelve hours in any period of twenty-four hours. 

Section 22. No person operating such motor vehicle shall solicit 
passengers by outcry or by any other noise. 

Section 23. No person shall cause or allow such motor vehicle 
to stand for more than five minutes in any public way except in such 
place and during such time as may be designated by said board. Said 
board may designate times and places in public ways in which general 
street travel will not be materially interfered with for such vehicles 
to stand and may from time to time change such times and places. 

Section 24. No person operating such motor vehicle shall stop 
the motor vehicle to take on or to discharge a passenger in any public 
way except at the sidewalk; nor allow any passenger to enter or leave 
the said motor vehicle except from the side thereof nearest the side- 
walk; but this latter provision shall not apply to a passenger on a 
front seat where the operator's seat is on the side toward the sidewalk. 

Section 25. Every person operating such motor vehicle shall 
fully stop the same immediately before crossing the track of a steam 
railroad at grade. 

Section 26. No person operating a motor vehicle shall place or 
maintain or allow to be placed or maintained on such vehicle a curtain 
or other obstruction in such way as to interfere with a view of the 
interior of the vehicle from outside except when necessary in order to 
protect passengers from the inclemency of the weather. 

Section 27. No person operating a motor vehicle shall require 
a passenger to pay for hand baggage carried by him more than the 
amount of fare charged for the transportation of a passenger or require 
a passenger to pay for hand baggage which is carried by the passenger 
without inconvenience to other passengers. 

Section 28. Every person operating a motor vehicle shall deliver 
any article left therein by a passenger to the officer in charge of the 
police station not later than twenty-four hours after finding the same 
and shall receive a receipt therefor. 



3^4 ANNUAL RBPOBTS 

Section 29. Whenever in the judgment of said board public con- 
venience and necessity so require the board may grant licenses for 
the transportation and carriage of passengers for hire by motor ve- 
hicles for short periods of time on terms stated in the orders granting 
the same, subject to provisions of sections 2, 4 and 5 and regardless 
of the other provisions of these orders, rules and regulations. 

Section 30. Nothing in these orders, rules and regulations shall 
be deemed to apply to motor vehicles used only for sight-seeing pur- 
poses. 

Section 31. Every license of any kind granted under these orders, 
rules and regulations shall expire on the first day of May next coming 
ensuing the date it was granted. 

Section 32. Said board may at any time at its discretion for any 
cause that it may deem sufficient and with or without notice to the 
licensee revoke or suspend any license of any kind granted under these 
orders, rules and regulations. 

Section 33. These orders, rules and regulations may be added 
to or otherwise changed from time to time by said board and such 
additions and changes shall apply to licenses of any kind previously 
issued as well as to licenses thereafter issued. 

Section 34. These orders, rules and regulations shall take effect 
upon their passage. 

Approved June 18, 1924. 



ORDINANCE NO. 108 

An Ordinance Relative to Vehicles Standing in Public Places 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somerville 
as follows: — 

Section 1. No person shall cause or allow an automobile or other 
vehicle to remain standing in a public street or public square at any 
time between thirty minutes after sunset and thirty minutes before 
sunrise, unless there is displayed on the front of said automobile or 
other vehicle a light which shall be visible not less than two hundred 
feet in the direction toward which said automobile or other vehicle 
is headed and a light on the rear of said automobile or other vehicle 
which shall be visible not less than two hundred feet in the opposite 
direction. 

Section 2. No person shall cause or allow an automobile or other 
vehicle to remain standing in a public street or public square for more 
than twenty minutes at any time between one o'clock in the morning 
and thirty minutes before sunrise. The provisions of this section 
shall not apply to a physician or clergyman while making a profes- 
sional call or to a licensee of an automobile or vehicle stand while 
occupying such stand. 

Section 3. Whoever violates any provision of this ordinance 
shall be subject to a penalty not exceeding twenty dollars for each 
offence. 

Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

Approved December 1, 1924. 



••'-er-TY CLK«R-. - 365 

ORDINANCE NO. 109 

An Ordinance Establishing Fire Districts 

Be it ordained by the board of aldermen of the city of Somerville, 
as follows: — 

Section 1. Fire districts are hereby established in the city of 
Somerville. Said fire districts shall include those portions of the city 
described as follows: 

Whenever a distance from a street or square is stated such 
distance is to be measured at right angles to such street or square. 

Fire District No. 1 — Teele Square 

Beginning at the junction of the northwesterly side of Cameron 
avenue and the southwesterly side of Holland street thence the bound- 
ary line runs southwesterly on Cameron avenue to a point one hundred 
feet from Holland street, thence northerly in a line parallel with 
Holland street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point one 
hundred feet southwesterly from Broadway, thence northwesterly in 
a line parallel with Broadway and distant one hundred feet therefrom 
to Waterhouse street, thence northeasterly on Waterhouse street to 
Broadway, thence easterly across Broadway to the junction of the 
southeasterly side of North street and the northeasterly side of Broad- 
way, thence northeasterly on North street to a point one hundred feet 
from Broadway, thence southeasterly in a line parallel with Broadway 
and distant one hundred feet therefrom to Packard avenue, thence 
southwesterly on Packard avenue to Broadway, thence in the same 
line across Broadway to a point one hundred feet southwesterly from 
Broadway, thence northwesterly in a line parallel with Broadway and 
distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point one hundred feet north- 
easterly from Holland street, thence southerly in a line parallel with 
Holland street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point in 
the line of the northwesterly side of Cameron avenue extended, thence 
southwesterly in said line to the point of beginning. 

Fire District No. 2 — Davis Square 

Beginning at the junction of the northwesterly side of Russell 
street and the southwesterly side of Elm street thence the boundary 
line runs southwesterly on Russell street to a point one hundred feet 
from Elm street, thence northerly in a line parallel with Elm street 
and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point one hundred feet 
southerly from Day street, thence southwesterly in a line parallel 
with Day street and distant one hundred feet therefrom three hundred 
feet, thence northerly across Day street and across Dover street to 
a point one hundred feet northerly from Dover street, thence easterly 
in a line parallel with Dover street and distant one hundred feet 
therefrom to a point one hundred feet westerly from Davis square, 
thence northerly in a line parallel with the westerly side of Davis 
square and distant one hundred feet therefrom across the railroad 
location to a point one hundred feet westerly from Holland street, 
thence northerly in a line parallel with Holland street and distant 
one hundred feet therefrom to Jay street, thence northeasterly on 
Jay street to Holland street, thence northeasterly to the junction of 
the easterly side of Holland street and the southerly side of Simpson 
avenue, thence northeasterly on Simpson avenue to a point one hun- 
dred feet from Holland street, thence southerly in a line parallel 
with Holland street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to Wal* 



^$G ASNVAh BBPOBTS 

lace street, thence easterly to the jimction of the easterly side of 
Wallace street and the southerly side of Park avenue, thence south- 
easterly along Park avenue to College avenue, thence southeasterly to 
the junction of the easterly side of College avenue and the southerly 
side of Winslow avenue, thence southeasterly along Winslow avenue 
to a point one hundred feet easterly from College avenue, thence 
southwesterly in a line parallel with and distant one hundred feet 
from College avenue to a point one hundred feet northeasterly from 
Highland avenue, thence southeasterly in a line parallel with High- 
land avenue and distant one hundred feet therefrom to Willow avenue, 
thence southwesterly along Willow avenue across Highland avenue and 
along Willow avenue again to a point one hundred feet southwesterly 
from Highland avenue, thence northwesterly in a line parallel with 
Highland avenue and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point one 
hundred feet easterly from Elm street, thence southerly in a line 
parallel with Elm street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to 
a point in the line of the northwesterly side of Russell street extended, 
thence southwesterly in said line to and across Elm street to the point 
of beginning. 

Fire District No. 3 — Highland Avenue 

Beginning at a point on the southeasterly side of Willow avenue 
distant one hundred feet northeasterly from Highland avenue, thence 
the boundary line runs southeasterly in a line parallel with Highland 
avenue and distant one hundred feet therefrom to Medford street, 
thence southwesterly in a line at right angles to Highland avenue to 
a point one hundred feet southwesterly from Highland avenue, thence 
northwesterly in a line parallel with Highland avenue and distant 
one hundred feet therefrom to Willow avenue, thence northeasterly 
on Willow a,venue to the point of beginning. 

Fire District No. 4 — Union Square 

Beginning at a point on the southeasterly side of Granite street 
one hundred feet northeasterly from Somerville avenue, thence the 
boundary line runs southeasterly in a line parallel with Somerville 
avenue and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a line one hundred 
feet northerly from Bow street, thence easterly and southeasterly in a 
line parallel with Bow street and distant one hundred feet therefrom 
to a point one hundred feet northeasterly from Union square, thence 
in a line parallel with the northerly side of Union square and distant 
one hundred feet therefrom to a point one hundred feet northerly from 
Washington street, thence northeasterly in a line parallel with Washing- 
ton street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point in the line 
of the northwesterly side of Prospect street extended, thence south- 
westerly in said line to and across Washington street and to and across 
Somerville avenue to a point distant one hundred feet southwesterly 
from Somerville avenue, thence northwesterly in a line parallel with 
Somerville avenue and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point 
one hundred feet southerly from the southerly side of Union square, 
thence westerly in a line parallel with the southerly side of Union 
square and distant one hundred feet therefrom across Webster avenue 
to a point one hundred feet westerly from the westerly side of Web- 
ster avenue, thence northerly in a line parallel with Webster avenue 
and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point one hundred feet 
southwesterly from Somerville avenue, thence northwesterly in a 
line parallel with Somerville avenue and distant one hundred feet 
therefrom to Dane street, thence northeasterly on Dane street to and 
across Somerville avenue to the point of beginning. 



icirru it:iuiiatK... -Mn 

Fire District No. 5 — Washington Street 

Beginning at the junction of the northwesterly side of Prospect 
street and the southerly side of Washington street, thence the bound- 
ary line runs northeasterly in line with said northwesterly side of 
Prospect street extended across Washington street to a point one 
hundred feet northerly from said Washington street, thence easterly 
and northeasterly in a line parallel with Washington street and distant 
one hundred feet therefrom to the boundary line between the city of 
Boston and the city of Somerville, thence southwesterly and southerly 
along said boundary line to and across Washington street to a point 
one hundred feet southerly from Washington street, thence westerly 
in a line parallel with Washington street and distant one hundred 
feet therefrom to the westerly side of Prospect street, thence north- 
erly along Prospect street to the point of beginning. 

Fire District No. 6 — Broadway 

Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Langmaid avenue 
distant one hundred feet northeasterly from Broadway, thence the 
boundary line runs southeasterly in a line parallel with Broadway 
and distant one hundred feet therefrom to the boundary line between 
the city of Boston and the city of Somerville, thence southwesterly 
along said boundary line to and across Broadway to a point one hun- 
dred feet southwesterly from Broadway, thence northwesterly in a line 
parallel with Broadway and distant one hundred feet therefrom to 
School street, thence northeasterly on School street to Broadway, 
thence northeasterly across Broadway to the point of beginning. 

Fire District No. 7 — Cross Street 

Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Cross street one hun- 
dred feet southerly from Broadway, thence the boundary line runs 
easterly one hundred feet in a line parallel with Broadway and distant 
one hundred feet therefrom, thence southerly in a line parallel with 
Cross street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to Medford street, 
thence northwesterly on Medford street to a point one hundred feet 
northwesterly from Cross street, thence northerly in a line parallel 
with Cross street and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point 
one hundred feet from Broadway, thence easterly to the point of be- 
ginning. 

Fire District No. 8 — Magoun Squ-are 

Beginning at the junction of the southeasterly side of Cedar 
street and the southwesterly side of Broadway, thence the boundary 
line runs northeasterly across Broadway in continuation of the easter- 
ly side of Cedar street to the boundary line between the city of Med- 
ford and the city of Somerville, thence southeasterly along said bound- 
ary line to a point in the line of the westerly side of Partridge avenue 
extended, thence southwesterlj'^ in said line across Broadway and along 
the westerly side of Partridge avenue to a point one hundred feet 
southwesterly from Broadway, thence northwesterly in a line parallel 
with Broadway and distant one hundred feet therefrom to a point 
one hundred feet northeasterly from Medford street, thence south 
easterly in a line parallel with Medford street and distant one hun- 
dred feet therefrom to Partridge avenue, thence southwesterly along 
Partridge avenue to and across Medford street, to a point one hundred 
feet southwesterly from Medford street, thence northwesterly in a 
line parallel with Medford street and distant one hundred feet there- 
from to a point one hundred feet southwesterly from Broadway, thence 
northwesterly in a line parallel with Broadway and distant one hun- 
dred feet therefrom to Cedar street, thence northeasterly on Cedar 
street to the point of beginning. 



o6S ANNUAL RSPOBTS 

Fire District No. 9 — Ball Square 

Beginning at the junction of the easterly side of Pearson road 
and the northeasterly side of Broadway, thence the boundary line runs 
northeasterly at right angles to Broadway to the boundary line be- 
tween the city of Medf ord and " the city of Somerville, thence south- 
easterly on said boundary line to the railroad location of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad southern division, thence southerly on said rail- 
road location to a point one hundred feet southwesterly from Broad- 
'way, thence northwesterly in a line parallel with Broadway and dis- 
tant one hundred feet therefrom to Liberty avenue, thence northeast- 
erly on Liberty avenue to Broadway, thence easterly across Broadway 
to the point of beginning. 

Section 2. The following regulations, restrictions and provisions 
sliall be applicable throughout the territory comprised within each 
and everj^ fire district. 

Section 3. No frame or wooden building or structure shall here- 
after be erected within a fire district as established by this ordinance 
and as may be hereafter established, except temporary one story frame 
buildings for the use of builders during the erection of a building or 
structure on the same lot or an adjoining lot and except verandas or 
ibalconies, provided that wooden posts supporting the stairs or roofs 
of such verandas and balconies shall be at least twenty-five square 
inches in cross section and provided that the roof covering of every 
structure shall be incombustible. 

Section 4. No wooden veranda, balcony or other wooden struc- 
ture except cornices or temporary buildings above mentioned shall 
liereafter be erected nearer than ten feet to the line of any adjoining 
lot or nearer than twenty feet to any frame or wooden building on 
the same lot. 

Section 5. Every building hereafter erected shall have its roof 
covered with brick, tile, slate, tin, copper, iron, tar gravel not less 
than three ply, slag or other incombustible roof covering. 

Section 6. In all buildings hereafter erected all door and window 
openings in walls that are less than ten feet distant from the centre 
of a street or passageway, or the side line of the lot, or from any other 
wall that has like openings, and openings in walls enclosing air or 
light shafts, shall have all such openings suitably protected by fire 
doors or shutters or wired glass and metal frames. 

Section 7. No existing frame or wooden building shall be in- 
creased in fioor area or height. 

Section S. No frame or wooden building shall be moved into a 
fire district or from one place in a fire district to another place in the 
same fire district, but a frame or wooden building may be moved 
from a fire district to territory outside any fire district. 

Section 9. No addition and no alteration shall be made to the 
•exterior of a frame or wooden dwellinghouse or other frame or wooden 
structure for the purpose of adapting it to use for a store, factory, 
place of storage, stable or junk shop. 

Section 10. No frame or wooden building damaged by fire or 
any other casualty to the extent of more than fifty per cent of its re- 
placement value shall be remodeled, replaced, or repaired in whole 
or in part by a frame or wooden form of construction. 

Section 11. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December 31, 1924. 



CITY CLERK. 



869 



ELECTIONS. 

The following is a statement of the votes cast in the sev- 
eral wards of the city for the candidates for the various offices 
and on the Referendum questions at the State Election held 
herein, November 4, 1924. 



Candidate. 



PRESIDENT 



Pakty. 



Coolidge & Dawes 
Davis & Bryan 
Foster & Gitlow 

Johns & Reynolds 



Republican 
Deniociatic 
Workers 
Party 
Socialist 
Labor Party 
LaFollette & W^heelerlndependent 

Progressive 



GOVERNOR 

John J. Ballam 

James M. Curley 
Alvan T. Fuller 
James Hayes 

"Walter S. Hutchins 
LIEUT. GOVERNOR 



Party 



Workers 

Party 

Democratic 

Republican 

Socialist 

Labor Party 

Socialist 

Party 



Frank G. Allen 
John J. Cummings 
Arthur A. Cunning 

Thomas Nicholson 



Republican 
Deniocratic 
Socialist 
Labor Party 
Socialist 
Party 
Edward Rand StevensWorkers 

Party 



SECRETARY 

Fredex'ic W. Cook 
Winfield A. Dwyer 

Samuel Leger 

H. Oscar Rocheleau 
Edith Williams 



TREASURER 



Republican 
Workers 
Party 
Socialist 
. Labor Partj^ 
Democratic 
Socialist 
Partr 



Michael L. Eisner 
Patrick H. Loftus 



Democratic 
Socialist 
Labor Party 

Louis Marcus Socialist 

Party 

Xlbert Oddie Workers 

Party 

"William S. Youngman Republican 



Wards. 



1500 
1114 



571 
1582 

3 

3 



473 i 460 



3 


4 


5 


1933 


1783 


2726 


1074 


761 


1327 


13 














3 



3167 I 6126 
1423 I 1274 



4 

4 

299 I 316 I 449 I 469 



2 
59 



Total . 



17806 

8556 

24 

71 



635 I 3001 



■•^1 5 j Hi 11 10 ! 10 : 18 j 67 
17^1 I 2384 1515 i 1147 l 1956 1 2148 , 1975 .12846 
J517 I 513 1882 ' 1826 I 2688 i 3140 i 5976 I 17542 



12 
4 



14 

17 



62 

13 



102 
66 



1468 j 434 j 1851 | 1750 ! 2602 i 3058 ; 5936 i 17109 
1580 , 2254 , 1392 i 1057 ! 1764 I 1947 1726 11720 



13 I 13 

4 I 5 

10 : U 



4 

10 



35 

21 
19 



16 
25 

18 



12 j 99 

20 86 

21 96 



1669 

48 

21 
1264 



652 2059 i 1929 2 920 j 3393 \ 6214 
58 ; 51 45 42 i 59 ; 60 



9 i 



1386 
18 
14 

15 

1467 



21 
1842 


: 

12 
1062 : 


7 


11 


1994 


1194 


19 


12 


11 


14 


22 
444 


16 

1827 



12 I 14 ; 20 
■94 1 1341 ! 1487 



4 


29 


29 


885 


1519 


1692 


48 


24 


34 


8 


3:^ 


34 


13 
1732 


24 
2698 


23 
3014 



36 
1239 

92 



1505 
68 
31 

41 

5741 



18836 

363 

188 
9029 

181 



10174 

22:^ 

145 

15;{ 

16823 



370 



ANNUAL RBlt)RTS 











Wards 










Can»u>ats. 


Partt. 
















1 




I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


JTot*!. 

1 


AUDITOR 


















; 


Strabo V. Claggrett 


Denioci'atic 


















Alonzo B. Cook 


;\epublican 


1546 


2069 


1503 


1127 


2036 


2153 


2397 


12831 


Isidore Harris 


Socialist 


i:«)3 


420 


1554 


1539 


2074 


2557 


4911 


; 14358 


James J. Lacey 


Labor Part\- 
Workers 


11 


22 


6 


18 


35 


32 


31 


155 


Dennis F. Reagan 


Party 
Socialist 


■2^ 


49 


•22 


16 


36 


47 


38 


2:^6 




!*arty 


21 


17 


'' 


7 


.35 


42 


27 


166 


ATTORNEY GENER 


AL 


















Jay K. Benton 


Republican 


1451 


478 


1843 


17«lT 


2522 


3040 


5907 


17106 


Harry J. Canter 


Workers 




















Part? 


40 


29 


20 


19 


30 


31 


52 


•J21 


F'rederick Oelcher 


Socialist 




















I^abor Party 


18 


11 


7 


9 


20 


19 


27 


111 


John Wea\er Sherman Socialist 




















Partv 


13 


18 


10 


14 


40 


38 


70 


1 20.3 


John E. Swift 


Democratic 


13H0 


1990 


1211 


876 


1526 


1720 


1434 


1 10137 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Frederick H. Gillett Republican 

Antoinette F. T\^orkers 

Knoikow l^arty 

David I. Walsh Democratic 



CONGRESSMAN 
Ninth District 

Arthur D. Healey Democratic 

Charles Jj. Underbill Republican 
HaiTV I. Thayer 



COUNCILLOR 4th District 

Charles Lawrence Burrill 

Republican 
Edwaid J. Caton Democi-atic 

Charles S. Smith 



SENATOR • 

Warren C. Daggett Hepublican 

Da.vid J. Kelley Democr-atic 
Charles G. Warren 



REPRESENTATIVES IN GENEAl 
COURT 23rd District 



William J. Bell 
Francis J. Daley 
Lyman A. Hodgdon 
Thomas F. Mackey 
James C. Scanlan 
Walter H. Snow 
Thomas R. Bateman 



Republican 
Democratic 
Republican 
Democratic 
Democratic 
Republican 



11«3 


314> 


! 
1639 ' 


17 


10 


1 
3 i 


1962 


2474 


1685 . 


1686 


2295 


1S27 


1369 


414 


1755 


1391 


448 




1738 


1311 


1811 


1153 


1379 




602 


■ 

1 
1685 


1463 


1983 


1322 


1407 
1380 
1S62 
1256 
1364 
1267 




1750 
1169 
1573 
1215 
1311 
1643 
1 



















2582 



5259 14?37 

20 ' 104 

2608 ; I49e0 



1172 1968 
1645 I 2452 

1 i 



2209 
2842 



2037 
5645 



Vimi 
16112 

1 



166;} I 2*54 2891 
814 i 1459 1609 

1 I 



1647 I 2241 
943 1895 

1 i 



2812 
1844 



1753 ; 2650 

880 1638 

1573 2246 

811 1356 

824 1370 

1615 2323 



5567 16152 
1474 9631 



5356 
1751 



15722 

11191 

1 



7660 
5067 
6754 
4638 
486» 
6849 
1 



CITY CLERK. 



:^71 



CANDIPATK. PAiRTT. 






Wards 


• 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total 


REPRESENTATIVES IN GENER 
AL COURT 24th District 


















Alexander F. Anderson, Jr. 

Democratic 




1895 

376 

355 

1770 

2088 

379 








1694 
2768 
2634 
1667 
1682 
2672 


1607 
5380 
5173 
1420 
1480 
5185 


5196 


Emeison J. Coldwell Republican 










8524 


Hiram N. Dearborn Republican 










8162 


James \. Dwyer Democratic 










4857 


Joseph A. Haley Democratic 
Prank A. Teele Republican 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 












5250 




8236 


















Alfred L. Cutting Republican 
Walter C. Wardwell Republican 


1505 

1554 


728 
883 


1866 
1914 


1775 
1776 


2C)86 
2671 


3052 
3229 


5605 
5791 


17,217 
17.818 


RE)GISTER OF PROBATE & IN- 
SOT^VENCY 


















John J. Butler Democratic 
Charles N. Harris Republican 


1449 
1343 


1919 
417 


1183 
1706 


9-26 
1606 


1587 
2395 


1776 
2780 


1656 
54ft5 


10,496 
15,-652 


COUNTY TREASURER 


















Charles E. Hatfield Republican 
Daniel F. McBride Democratic 


1420 
1426 


434 
1967 


1787 
1158 


1671 
920 


2478 
1592 


2902 

1734 


5602 
1595 


16,294 
10.39'2 



•J / */ 



ANNUAL REI»ORTS 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 1 

Amendment to Constitution 

Shall an amendinent to the con- 
stitution relative to the qualifi- 
cations of voters for certain state 
offiders ^striking- out the word 
"male"), which received in a joint 
session of the two Houses held 
May 24, 1921, 258 votes in the af- 
firmative and none in the nega- 
tive, and at a joint session of 
the two Houses held May 10. 1923, 
received 254 votes in the affirma- 
tive and none in the negative, be 
approved? 

Number of "Yes" votes, 
Number of "No" votes. 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 2 

Amendment to Constitution 

Shall an amendment to the con- 
stitution to enable women to hold 
any state, county or municipal of- 
fice, and which further provides 
that a change of name of any 
woman, holding- a Notary Public 
Commission, shall not render her 
commission void but she shall re- 
register under her new name and 
shall pay such fee therefor as shall 
be established by the general 
court, which received in a joint 
session of the two Houses held 
May 24, 1921, 216 votes in the af- 
firmative and none in the nega- 
tive, and at a joint session of the 
two Houses held May 10, 1923, re- 
ceived 258 votes in the affirmative 
and none in the negative, be ap- 
proved? I 



Number of "Ye.<" Votes, 
Number of "No" Votes, 



Wards. 



1180 

858 



678 
770 



1165 739 
911 I 770 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 3 ' 

I 

Shall a law (Chapter 370 of the 
Acts of 1923) which provides that 
no person shall manufacture, 
transport by aircraft, watercrafi 
or vehicles, import or export spir-i 
ituous or intoxicating liquor, asi 
defined bj' section 3 of chapteri 
188 of the General "Laws, or cer-i 
tain non-intoxicating beverages,' 



1407 
705 



1220 
636 



1441 
759 



Total. 



1889 2187 
998 1103 



3852 12363 
1366 6436 



1292 1946 ; 2272 
689 1077 ! 1202 



3964 ! 12819 
1514 6932 



CITY CLERK. 



373 



as defined by section 1 of said 
chapteij 138, unless in each in- 
stance !he shall have obtained the 
permit ior other authority required 
therefor by the laws of the United 
States and the regulations made 
thereunder, which law was ap- 
proved by both branches of the 
General Court by votes not record- 
ed, and was approved by His Ex- 
cellency the Governor, be ap- 
proved i 

Number of "Yes" Votes, 
Number of "No" Votes, 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 4 

Shall a law (Chapter 454 of the 
Acts of 1923) which provides for 
the raising of funds toward the 
cost of the construction and main- 
tenance of highways by means of 
an excise tax of two cents on each 
gallon of gasoline and other fuel 
used for propelling motor vehicles 
on the highways of the Common- 
wealth, said tax to be paid by 
the purchaser to the distributor, 
who, in turn, pays it to the Com- 
monwealth, and the money to be 
credited to a fund to be known 
as the gasoline-highway fund, out 
of which reimbursement is to be 
made to purchasers, who shall con- 
sume the gasoline or other fuel in 
any manner except in the opera- 
tion of motor vehicles on the high- 
ways, and the expenses of carry- 
ing out the act are to be paid, 
fifty per cent of the balance of 
said fund to be distributed to the 
cities and towns of the Common- 
wealth, in proportion to the 
amounts which they contribute to 
the State tax, and this fifty per 
cent to be expended in construc- 
tion or improvement of public 
ways within the city or town lim- 
its, and the other fifty per cent 
to be expended by the State De- 
partment of Public Works on such 
highways as it may select, which 
law was approved by both branch- 
es of the General Court by votes 
not recorded, and was approved by 
Hjs^ iBxeellejncy the Governor, be 
approved? 



Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 



Wards, 



Total. 



1177 
1351 



696 
1346 



1637 
1083 



1217 
1166 



2078 
1657 



2372 
1941 



4309 
2283 



1348ft 
10827 



707 
1617 



373 
1393 



842 
1633 



746 
1464 



1064 
2395 



1150 2057 
2778 4015 



6939 
16296 



:J74 



ANNUAL BEPORTS 



Wards. 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 5 

Shall a law (Chapter 473 of the 
Acts of 1923) which amends ex-; 
isting legislation on the same sub- 
ject and provides that, subject 
to certain limitations, no person 
shall engage or be !financially 
interested in the business of re- 
ceiving deposits of money for safe 
keeping or for the purpose of 
transmitting the same or equiva- 
lents thereof to foreign countries 
unless he has executed and de- 
livered a bond to the State Treas- 
urer, )or depoteited securities in 
lieu thereof, and has received a 
license from the Commissioner of 
Banks authorizing him to carry on 
such business; that any money 
which in case of breach of bond 
shall be paid by the licensee or 
surety thereon, or the securities 
deposited in lieu thereof, shall 
constitute a trust fund for the 
benefit of depositors; that the li- 
cense shall be revocable by the 
Commissioner of Banks for cause 
shown; that the money deposited 
with licensees for safe keeping 
shall be invested in the manner 
prescribed by the act; and that 
the violation of any provision of 
the act shall be punished in the 
manner therein prescribed, which 
law was approved by both branch- 
es of the General Court by votes 
not recorded, and was approved 
by His Excellency the Governor, 
be approved ? 



Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

NO. 6 

"Shall daylight saving be re- 
tained by law in Massachusetts?' 



2 


3 


4 






1 



5 : 6 



Total. 



3800 

572 I 570! 570 I 577 : 750 ! 1080 951 



Number of "Yes" Votes, 
Number of "No" Votes, 



i 1235 
i|1260 



1207 
981 



1590 
1131 



1067 


i 

i 

1885 


577 


750 


1298 


2167 


1066 


1520 



2598 
1654 



4067 
2270 



r20S8 

5070 



14157 
9882 



C^r*" CLBRK. 



375 



CAN'DIKATK. 



I'ARTY. 



REFERENDUM QUESTION 

MO. 7 

* 

J.s it desirable that tlie general 
court ratify the following pro 
posed amendment to the const! 
tution of the United States: — 
"Section 1. The Congress shall 
have power to limit, regulate, and 
prohibit the labor of persons un- 
der eighteen years of age. Sec- 
tion 2. The power of the several 
States is unimpaired by this arti- 
cle except that the operation of 
State laws shall be suspended to 
the extent necessary to give ef- 
fect to legislation enacted by the 
Congress." ? 

Number of "Yes" Votes, 
Number of "No" Votes, 

To vote on the following, mark 
a Cross X in the square at the 
right of YES or NO:— 

"Shall an act passed by the gen- 
eral court in the year nineteen 
hundred and twenty-four, entitled 
'A<n Act to establish the salary of 
members of the board of aldermen 
of the city of Somerville' be ac- 
cepted?" 

Number of "Yes" Voles, 
Naimber of "No" Votes, 



Wakdm. 



1 I 2 



532 I 205 
2169 2249 



628 
2160 



980 
1505 



542 
1910 



933 
1203 



925 
2937 



1387 
1932 



Total . 



1074 j 2103 
3348 t 4443 



1502 2638 9366 



2331 ' 3155 



6009 
19216 



12515 



376 ANNUAL REPORTS 

ASSESSED POLLS AND REGISTERED VOTERS. 





1 


As- 
sessed 
Polls, 
April 

1, 
1924 








Registered ' 


V^OTERS. 








Wakd 


Pcrr. 


i Dec. 

■ 11. 
1923 
Men 


De*^'. 

11. 

1923 

Women 


Re- 
vised 
Lists 

of 
July 

1924 


Re- 

; vised 
: Lists 

of 
i Julv 
i 1924 


' Add- Add- 
', ed in 1 ed in 

1 1924 , 1924 
Men Women 


Nov. Nov. 

4. ; 4. 
1 19.'4 1 1924 
1 Men i Women 


1 

1 Voted 

INov. 

! 1924 














Men 


! Women 


1 




, 


Ward 


1 Pet. I 


1,648 


772 


550 


733 


521 


i 183 i 197 


■ 916 


718 


1457 


*' 


1 " 2 


1,185 


544 


370 


5101 352 


: 159! 137 


669 


489 


1008 


" 


li " 3 


588 


311 


197 


278 


1 202 


64; 59 


342 


261 


515 




1' " 4 


693 


206 


122 


205 


' 121 


, 48! 46 


> 253 


167 


366 




4.114 


1,833 


1.239 


1 .726 


1 1196 


454 439 

1 


' 2.180 


1.635 


3,346 


Ward 


2 Pet. 1 


1.097 


337 


177 


337 


1 186 


, 73! 87 


410 


273 


60 


•* 


2 " 2 


2.027 


909 


' 660 


892 


' 695 


2321 223 


1124 


918 


1.729^ 




2 " 3 


855 


417 


248 


384 


257 


63 76 


447 


333 


648 




3,979 


i 1,663 


1,085 


1,613 


1138 


368! 386 


1,981 


1.524 


2,980 


Ward 


3|Pct. 1 1,552 


884 


759 


903 


846 


I37I 1,54 


1040l 1000 


1.834 


•t 


3! " 2 


1,404 


811 


696 


801 


772 


1171 141 


918 


916 


1.649 




2.956 


1,695 


1.455 


1.704 


1.618 


2541 298 


1,958 


1,916 


3.483 


Ward 


4|Pet. 1 


1.558 


848 


649 


808 


678 


164 196 


972 


874 


1.616 




4 " 2 


1.459 


746 


573 


708 


601 


155 


185 


863 


786 


1.454 




3.017 


1.594 


1,222 


1,516 


1,279 


319 


381 


1,835 


1.660 


3,070 


Ward 


5 


Pet. 1 


1.701 


917 


845 


923 


856 


213 256 


1136 1112 


2,044 


" 


5 


" 2 


1.264 


701 


579 


684 


600 


137 164 


821 764 


1,428 




5 


3 


1.115 


658 


536 


638 


564 


114 154 


752 


718 


1,297 




1 


4,080 


2,276 


1,96(» 


2.245 


2,020 


464 574 


2.709 


2.594 


4,769 


Ward 


6 


Pet. 1 


1.272 


711 


542 


673 


575 


112! 127 


785 


702 


1,324 


" 


6 


2 


1.422 


694 


423 


648 


436 


135 


113 


783 


549 


1.167 


" 


6 


3 


1,087 
1,425 


-- 608 
849 


48Q 


614 


536 


. 103 


„ 108. . 
191 


-.._717. 
1016 


644^^ 

902 


- i.22a 


" 


6 •• 4 


-650 


840 


711 


176 


1.710 








5,206 


2,862 


2.095 


2.775 


2,258 


526 


539 


3.301 


2.797 


b,4'S0 


Ward 


7 


Pet. 1 


1.194 


800 


647 


806 


698 


102! 140 


908 


838 


1.600 


" 


7 


2 


1.405 


812 


676 


778 


692 


1631 170 


941 


862 


1.596 


" 


7 


3 


1,819 


1.006 


757 


989 


823 


2031 193 


1192 


1016 


1.927 


" 


7 


4 


1.219 


757 


579 


751 


646 


115 


118 


866 


764 


1,471 


" ■ 


7 


6 


1,327 


637 


609 
3,168 


735 


652 


225 


214 


960 


866 


1.643 






6.964 


4.012 


4.059 


3 511 


808 


835 


4.867 


4.346 


8.237 


City 







30.316 


15,935 


12.214 


15.638 


13.020 


3,193 


3.452 


18.831 


16.472 


31.315 



CITY CLKIiK. 



'Ml 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1924 



Mayor 
John M. Webster, 76 Boston Street 

Board of Aldermen 

President, Lyman A. Hodgdon 

Vice President. Albert E. Hughes 



WAED ONE 

Lyman A. Hodgdon, Alderman-at-large 
William F. Burns ..... 
Daniel A. Downey . . . 



8 Indiana Avenue 

21 Illinois Avenue 

155 Glen Street 



WARD TWO 



Edwin J. Grant, Alderman-at-large 
Joseph A. Haley .... 
John J. Hoban ..... 



21 Webster Avenue 

7 Linden Street 

39 Mansfield Street 



M'ARD THREE 

Thomas D. Mitchell, Alderman-at-large 25 Warren Avenue 

William C. Abbott (Died December 23, 1924) 73 Avon Street 

Charles E. Gerrish (Elected to fill vacancy Dec. 23, 1924) 

70 Boston Street 
George A. Berry 60 Prescott Street 



WARD FOUR 



John S. Smith, Jr. Alderman-at-large 
Henry J. Connell .... 
Warren A. Perry .... 



20 Richdale Avenue 

150 Pearl Street 

11 Evergreen Avenue 



WARD FIVE 

Arthur W. Russell, Alderman-at-large . 

Warren C. Blair 

Charles C. Grimmons . . 



41 Sewall Street 
155 Summer Street 
72 Thurston Street 



WARD SIX 

Albert E. Hughes, Alderman-at-large . 
William M. Morrison .... 
I. Ormand Jackson 



20 Aberdeen road 

97 Rogers Avenue 

7 Lexington Avenue 



WARD SEVEN 

Arthur P. Mason, Alderman-at-large . 

Paul 0. Curtis 

Albert P. McLean 



18 Hall Avenue 

41 Mason Street 

98 Electric Avenue 



;)78 



AXXIAL KEl'OIiTS. 



City Clerk. Jason M. Carson 

Assistant City Clerk. Henry J. Allen 

City Messenger, Fred E. Hanley 



Regular meetings, second and fourth Thui^sdav evenings 
of each month, at edght o'clock, except when such Thursday 
is a holiday, in which case the meeting is held on the preced- 
ing Tuesday evening. 



standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 

Electric Lines and Lights — Aldermen Mason, Mitchell, Perry, Hoban 
and Jackson. 

Ii*iNANCE — The President. Aldermen Russell, Berry. Curtis, Hughes, 
Haley and Perry. 

liEGisLATivE MATTERS — Aldermen Hughes, Berrv, Russell, Connell and 
Haley. 

Licenses and Permits — Aldermen Abbott, Morrison. Mason, Connell, 

Grimmons, Burns and Hoban. 
Public Pkopebty — Aldermen Morrison, Blair, McLean, Downey, and 

Grant. 
PuBUC Safety — Aldermen Smith, Abbott, Grimmons, Curtis and Burns. 
Public Works — Aldermen Mitchell. Smith, McLean, Blair. Grant, 

Jackson and Downey. 



School Committee 

Chairman. Harry M. Stoodley 
Vice-Chairman. John J. Hayes 



Hon. John M. Webster Mayor, ex-oflicio 76 Boston Street 

Lyman A. Hodgdon. President of the Board of Aldermen, ex-officio 

8 Indiana Avenue 



Francis J. Fitzpatrick 
John J. Hayes . 



WARD ONE 



2 Austin Street 
10 Wisconsin Avenue 



Daniel H. Bradley . 
Christopher J. Muldoon 



WARD two 



19 Concord Avenue 
88 Concord Avenue 



Charles W. Boyer . 
Oscar W. Codding . 



WARD THREE 



66 Avon Street 
59 Vinal Avenue 



CITY CLERK. 



370 



Katherine C. Coveney 
Walter E. Whittaker 



WARD FOUR 



73 Marshall Street 
135 Walnut Street 



Harry M. Stoodley 
Minnie S. Turner 



WARD FIVE 



238 Highland Avenue 
64 Hudson Street 



Walter I. Chapman . 
Walter Frye Turner 



WARD SIX 



18a Central Street 
15 Highland Road 



Herbert Cholerton 
Edwin A. Shaw 



WARD SEVEN 



94 College Avenue 
63 College Avenue 



Superintendent and Secretary — Charles S. Clark 

Regular meetings last Monday evening of each month, 
except July and August, when none are held, and December, 
when meeting is held on the Friday preceding the first Mon- 
day in January. 



Assessors 



Fred E. Warren, Chairman (term expires 1926) 
Winsor L. Snow, (term expires 1927) 
Harry Van Iderstine (term expires 1926) 
J, Robert Fenelon (term expires 1925) 
David B. Armstrong (term expires 1927) 



Assistant Assessors 



Fred B. Clai> 
Harry L. Haseltine 
Herbert S. Kingman 



John J. McCarthy 
John M. Nangle 
Leonard C. Spinney 



Board of Health 

Wesley M. Goff (term expires 1925) 

James A. Kiley (term expires 1926) 

Cheslie a. C. Richardson, M. D., Chairman (term 
expires 1925) 

Executive Clerk — Laurence S. Howard 

Agent — George I. Canfield 

Medical Inspector — Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions — Charles M. Berry 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar — Herbert E. Bowman 



380 ANNUAL RKrOKTS. 



Licensing Commission 



William J. Smanahan (term expires 1928) 
Eugene M. Cakman (term expires 1926) 
William H. Smith (term expires 1927) 



Department of Public Welfare 

Fred E. Di'U(;in, Chairman (term expires 1926) 
Michael Coll. Vice-Chairman (term expires 1927) 

(Died December 7, 1924) 
James D. Shakkey — appointed Dec. 29, 1924 
George G. Brayley (term expires 1925) 
Agent — William E. Copithorne 
Warden. City Home — J. Foster Colquhoun 
Matron, City Home — Catherine Colquhoun 



Planning Board 

William F. Riley. Chairman (term expires 1926) 
David J. Kelley. Secretary (term expires 1929) 
Benjamin J. Surrett (term expires 1925) 
John Williamson (term expires 1927) 
George J. Rauh (term expires 1928) 



Registrars of Voters 

Edwin D. Sibley. Chairman (term expires 1927) 
Douglass B. Foster (term expires 1926) 
Charles Leo Shea (term expires 1925) 
Jason M. Carson. City Clerk 

Assistant Registrars of Voters 
John L. Amearn (term expires 1925) 



Public Library Trustees 

Thomas M. Direll, Chairman (term expires 1925) 
J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1926) 
William L. Barber (term expires 1925) 
Herbert L. Buffum (term expires 1926) 
Giles W. Bryant (term expires 1927) 
FiiANK M. Barnard (term expires 1926) 
Leon M. Con well (term expires 1927) 
George E. Whitaker (term expires 1927) 
Librarian and Secretary — George H. Evans 



CITY CLERK. 381 

Public Welfare and Recreation Commission 

Ernest W. Bailey (term expires 1925) 
Sophie C. Bateman (term expires 1925) 
Charles S. Clark, (term expires 1926) 
William E. Copititorne (term expires 1925) 
George L. Dudley (term expires 1925) 
Florence B. Hamilton (term expires 1926) 
William S. Howe (term expires 1926) 
Margaret L. Magutre (term expires 1925) 
Mary M. McGann (term expires 1926) 
Annie M. Smith (term expires 1926) 

City Clerk 

Jason M. Carson 
Assistant City Clerk — Henry J. Allen 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 
Joseph S. Pike 

City Messenger 
Fred E. Hanley 

Mayor's Secretary 
Sumner M. Teele 

City Solicitor 
Frank W. Kaan 

City Auditor 

Howard E. Wemyss 

City Engineer 
Ernest W. Bailey 

Commissioner of Streets 
Asa B. Prtchard 

Commissioner of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings 

George L. Di^dley 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights 

Walter I. Filler 

Water Commissioner 
Frank E. Merrill 

Superintendent of Sanitary Department 
Edgar T. Maybew 

Clerk of Comnaittees 
Richard A. Keyes 



382 ANNUAL KKPOKTS. 

Chief of Police 
Charles A. Kendall 

Chief Engineer of the Fire Department 
Sewall M. Rich 

City Physician 
Feank E, Bateman 

Inspector of Plumbing 
Duncan C. Greene 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
Herbert E. Bo\yman 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Charles M. Berry 

Inspector of Petroleum 
Sewall M. Rich 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Benjamin S. Abbott 

Fence Viewers 

Charles M. Berry 
Howard Lowell 

Agent of Military and State Aid and Soldiers' Relief and Burial Agent 

Benjamin S. Abbott 

Constables 

Maurice F. Ahearn Thomas Damery Charles A. Kendall 
Charles M. Austin William J. DiGuiseppeMichael T. Kennedy 

Charles W. F. BennettCharles L. Ellis Elbridge G. Lavender 

Salvatore Bianchino Arthur L. Gilman Edward E. Marsh 

Eugene A, Carter Fred E. Hanley John M. Nangle 

William E. CopithobneJames M. Harmon John A. Ray 

WiNSLow W. Coffin Ernest Howard John F. Scannell 

Albion B. Crocker Frank B. Karcher William E. Young 

Wiijjam H. Yottng 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 



38^5 



PUBLIC WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION, 

1924 



CHAELES S. CLARK 

MRS. SOPHIE C. BATEMAN 

GEORGE L. DUDLEY 



Chairman 

Vice- Chairman 

Secretanr 



MEMBERS 



CHARLES S. CLARK 
WILLIAM STUART HOWE 
MRS. FLORENCE B. HAMILTON 
MISS MARY M. McGANN 
MRS. ANNIE M. SMITH 
MRS. SOPHIE C. BATEMAN 
GEORGE L. DUDLEY 
ERNEST W. BAILEY 
WILLIAM E. COPITHORNE 
MRS. MARGARET L. MAGUIRE 



Term 
Expires 
January 

192^ 
192S 
1926; 
192& 
192(i 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 



FRANCIS J. MAHONEY 



Director 



r>S4 ANNUAL KErUKTS 



REPORT OF PUBLIC WELFARE AND RECREATION 

COMMISSION 



To tlie Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : 

Having a somewhat larger appropriation for the fiscal 
year jnst closed, the Pnblic Welfare and Recreation Commis- 
sion was able to ex])and its activities in several directions 
withont cnrtailing any of the major policies w^hich it has 
followed in the past. The effort has been to give greater serv- 
ice in the well-established lines and to seek by experiment- 
ing to disc()\er new fields wherein the Commission could give 
to the commnnity additional opportunities for wholesome rec- 
reation. Of its appropriation of .|7,0()(), the larger part was 
ap])lied to the carrying on of supervised playgr(mnds during 
the summer season and on special days in the Spring and 
Fall. The next larger emphasis was upon social centers, sev- 
<*ral of which have been conducted two evenings a week while 
another has been in operation on week days. Public meet- 
ings have been held, holiday observances have been assisted, 
and the spread of athletic undertakings outside of school 
hours has been encouraged among the youth of the city 
throughout the year. Tn addition to these things accom- 
plished, various things have been attempted by way of study 
and inouiry to discoNer the possibilities of providing a more 
diversified program for another year. Some of these begin- 
nings are promising and indicate possibilities for leader/ship 
by the Commission within the scope of its present financial 
resources. 

The Commission during the past year has continued to 
study the local situation with a view of determining what 
service it could best perform for the community. Tt recog- 
nizes the duty of giving to the public information concern- 
ing its own undcM-takings and concerning conditions which af- 
fect the development of a larger program of municipal provi- 
sion for recreation. It believes that it should encourage a 
])r()g]-essi\(' incr<'ase in ex])enditure for this purpose in or- 
der that the city may gradually come into possession of bet- 
ter facilities for this important interest of the people. It 
believes strongly that the welfare of a communitj' is pro- 
moted by its possession of adequate means for wholesome 
outdoor j-ecreation available especially for that large pro- 
portion of the people who spend most of the time within its 
limits. Therefore, in this report will be found a careful an- 
alysis of present conditions and recommendations for improve- 
ments. The Commission believes that it is the part of good 



WEI>FAKE ANF) IIK('RKATI()N COMMISSION. 385 

public ])olicv for tlic citv to cxpciKl upon sucli iniprovements 
sums siiflficient to make a material advance in better in" condi- 
tions. 

The carrying on of the work of the Commission under 
the leadeislii]) of a director has involved a large amount of 
detail and the direction, at ditf'erent times, of considerable 
numbers of workers. Since the beginning of this work, through 
the courtesy of the School Committee, the Director has had 
ofHce space in the rooms of the School C'ommittee. The work 
has reached the point, however, when special provision should 
be made for the Director and for the general work of the 
Commission. Such ])rovisioii slumld include an office with 
suitable equipment including a telephone. This need must 
be met in the near future if the work of the (V)mmission 
is to go on with unchecked efficiency. 

The various undertakings noted in this report have been 
carried on under the personal supervii^ion of the part-time 
Director employed by the Commission. To his energy and 
enthusiasm is due in a large part the success of the work of 
the year. 

At the request of the Commission, Mr. Mahoney has sub- 
mitted a detailed report of all of the undertakings conducted 
during the last year under the direction of the Commission 
and has set fortli with clearness the conditions under Avhich 
this work has been cari-ied on. He has also made numerous 
recommendations for the improvement of these conditions. 
The Commission believes that such a statement will be of value 
in determining future action in respect to improving means 
of recreation in our city. That there is need for such improve- 
ment there can be no doubt in the mind of any one familiar 
with the facts. No stronger argument in favor of increased 
])ro vision for the welfare of the children of the city is needed 
than that found in the annual report of the Somerville Plan- 
ning Board for the year 11)2.*), Chapter VI, on Parks and 
Playgrounds. It strongly advocates increased provision of 
playgrounds, su])ervision of playgrounds, and increased ecjuip- 
ment upon the grounds already provided. In discussing the 
playgrounds of the city, the (\)mmission estimates that at 
tliat time "the school and park playgrounds would at best 
raise the play area per child to 20 square feet.'' This it com- 
pares with the ''minimum standard of 50 square feet per child 
that most ])rogresKive cities are obtaining." Concerning super- 
\ ision of })laygrounds, the Commission makes the following 
stateuK^nt : 

'^Supervision is crucial in playground operation. An un- 
supervised playground is for the child, hardly better than a 
vacant lot A good playground director is a God- 



386 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

send to the children In visiting tlie playgrounds 

it was found that there wa^s no play of value going on, as a 
rule, out^^ide of the days and hours and places where super- 
vision was provided. This finding, however, is in accordance 
witli the experience of American cities in general. During 
six months of the year pla^- can be directed during the day- 
light hours when the child is not in school, to the enormous 

advantage of the children and of all citizens No 

criticism of the quality of the present supervision of play- 
grounds is intended, for the investigators have been most fav- 
orably impressed with the character of supervised play so far 
provided. What is suggested is an increase in quantity, which 
means eventualh' a several-fold increase of the appropriation 
for play purposes in the city. Such an increased appropria- 
tion should come back to the city many-fold in the form of 
healthier, happier, and better citizens." 

In this connection, the Commission wants to put on rec- 
ord its ai)proval of the action of the Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen in adding to the playgrounds of the city during the 
last year such an important area as that on the corner of 
Cherry and Elm Streets. This piece of property, situated in 
a densely populated region, will be a boon to the children of 
that neighborhood. 

The (Commission has carried on its work during the past 
year with a profound conviction that the children of the City 
need and are entitled to receive greater attention from the 
public than has been given to them in the matter of provision 
for wholesome recreation. The report of the Planning Board 
quoted above shows that the City is not giving to its children 
an amount of play space recognized as a minimum of provi- 
sion by most progressive cities. There can be no doubt that 
the citizens of Somerville have a pride in their city and a 
pride in their children. There can be no doubt that when 
once the citizens become acquainted with the true state of af- 
fairs they will determine to give more numerous play spaces 
to the children. In the matter of use of playgrounds and in 
the purchase of new ones, the record of the year just closed 
is encouraging. The Commission looks forward to greater ac- 
complishments in 1925. It is the hope of the Commission that 
this report will show to the citizens of the City sufficient rea- 
sons for more rapid development in the future of the work and 
interests which the Commission was created to foster and 
manage. 

Respectfully submitted, for the Commission, 

Charles S. Clark^ 

Gha4rina4i. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. .'>87 

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF RECREATION 

To the Public Welfare and Recreation Commission: — 

111 tliis rc^port, submitted respectfully to your Commis- 
sion, on the activities and undertakings assigned by the Com- 
mission to my sui)ervision, the purpose is to recount the ac- 
complishments of the year 1924; to present the Director's 
view of the present status of the general undertaking that 
embraces these activities; to consider the possibilities sug- 
gested by these accomplishments and this view; to mention 
provisions which, in my judgment, are necessarj^ or highly 
desirable for the future success of the Recreation work and 
the promotion of Public Welfare by your Department; and to 
present suggestions and information that ma}^ assist your 
Commission in defining its policies and in reorganizing or 
elaborating its program for pursuit of the objectives of a Pub- 
lic Welfare and Recreation Department. 

Scope of This Report 

Resulting from the entrance of this department during 
1924 into an expanded field of activity, the duties of your 
Director have been increased in number and variety as his 
services have been directed along the new lines of action. 
Accordingly, it seems wise, in presenting this report, to give 
separate consideration to these various branches of the Recre- 
ation work. They include 

J. The Summer Playgrounds 

II. The Spring-and-Fall Supervised Athletics 

III. The Saturday Playgrounds for Small Chil- 

dren 
ly. Evening Adult Recreation Centers 

V. The Neighborhood Center 

VI. The Preserving and Canning Activities of 

School Children. 

VII. The Recreational-Civic Activities Involving 

the General Public 

VIII. The Experiment in Community Recreational 

Drama 

IX. Public Celebrations. 

Summer Playgrounds 

The essential character and general mode of the Sum- 
mer Playgrounds Season is the same as those of the 1923 
season, reported a year ago by the Director. 



o88 ANNUAL RErORTS 

Features 

But some new features of the season of 11)24 are con- 
s[)icnous to the observation of the Director, and are judged 
worthy of special mention- under this caption. More detailed 
reference to them, each under its proper heading, will follow. 

Five new units of supervised play, added to the Sum- 
mer Playgrounds system this year to serve the interests of 
children in sections of the City hitherto served most meagerly 
or not at all, have, in the Director's estimation, been so suc- 
cessfully operated as to constitute the most beneficial accom- 
plishment that can be cited under consideration of Summer 
Playgrounds within five years or more. 

Five recommendations by the Director of Playgrounds, 
at the close of the 1923 season in reporting to the Commis- 
sion, have been carried into execution fully or in part, with 
liighly beneficial results to tlie play activities of children 
served by the Summer supervision. 

More em])hatic need than before of action upon the re- 
maining thret^ recommendations of last year, and of immedi- 
ately completing the execution of those recommendations 
which have bt'en only partly carried out, impresses itself upon 
the observer who studies the activities and accom])lishments 
of the 1924 season. 

A very striking regularity of attendance on each of the 
playgrounds throughout the season is indicated by the daily 
and weekly attendance records. This regularity is accom- 
panied by remarkably high figures of attendance on nearly 
all playgrounds. The importani:*e of these two facts lies in 
tliat they indicate intense utilization of playground facilities, 
sustained at its height throughout tlie season. 

New permanent e(]uipment and emphasis on athletic ac- 
tivities dependent on this equipment have added to the inten- 
sity and variety of boys' play on the supervised areas. 

A marked public interest in playground work, noted and 
reported last year, has continued to express itself this year, 
even to more marked degree and in greater variety of ways, 
especially among citizens in those sections of Somerville 
where new playground units have been supervised this past 
Summer for the first time. 

Still further intensity in Track and Field Athletics, initi- 
ated in 1928, has increased the interest of children in gener- 
al in the Summer play. 

"Safety" activities among the children, promoted by the 
supervisory corps and sustained throughout the season, with 
the particular objective of combating the danger from street 
traffic, were an important part of the season's program. 



WELFARE ANT) KK('REATI()X COMMISSION. 389 

(\)iH*i'ete instances of volunteer citizen partici])ation in 
the J*layj>ronn(]s enterprise lias been exeniplitierl in the fund, 
for the purchase of prizes in competitive athletics, to which 
contributions were voluntarily in.ule by business men and 
other interested citizens. 

A remarkably competent, efficient, and zealous corps of 
play-supervisois and assistants has given to the season's work 
an animus and vitality that have brought forth many favor- 
able comments of public officials, private citizens and public 
press, regai'ding the efficiency and aptitude of these workers. 
This feature is mxi^ntioned as important because, in my judg- 
ment, its effects on the play jictivities constitute one of the 
greatest assets of the playgrounds organization in facing the 
immediate future. 

Grounds 

Thirteen areas were used for playground purposes dur- 
ing the past Summer. Sixteen units were conducted, how- 
ever, scmie of these areas having separate units for boys and 
girls. The various units are named as follows, and the names 
suggest the areas utilized : 

Bennett School Ground (for girls) 

Central Hill Park (for girls and boys) 

George Dilboy Field (for boys) 

Fellsway East (for boys) 

Saxton C. Foss Park (for girls) 

Hodgkins School Grounds (for girls) 

Joy St. Playground (for boys) 

Kent Street Boys' Playg'round 

Kent Street Girls' Playground 

Lincoln Park (for boys) 

Morse School Grounds (for girls and boys) 

Perry School Grounds (for girls) 

Richard Trum Boys' Playground 

Richard Trum Girls' Playground 

Tufts College Old Campus (for girls) 

Western Playground (for boys) 

(At Western Junior High School Grounds) 

Five of these units were new this year to the Playgrounds 
system : — those at Joy Street Playground, Dilboy Field, Tufts 
College Old Campus and at the Morse and Western Junior 
High School grounds. We have already stated that they have 
been operated with complete success, in the Director's opinion, 
and that, in service to the play needs of Somerville children, 
their operation seems to be the most considerable develop- 
ment the Playgrounds sj^stem has experiencd in a period of 
five years. 



390 ANNUAL R«I»ORTS 

The Playground at Dilboy Field, in its results this Sum- 
mer, affords a strong illustration of the growth of playground 
needs in Somerville; the growth of public, and especially chil- 
dren's interest in and appreciation of the Playgrounds idea ; 
and the growth in the public service being rendered in the 
field of Municipal Recreation under your Commission. 

A previous experiment in conducting supervised play 
at Dilboy Field, in 1920, was early abandoned because the 
attendance of children and the degree of activity did not war- 
rant the expense of continued experiment. This past Sum- 
mer, on the contrary, the average daily attendance was far in 
excess of the minimum previously set hj your Commission 
as sufficient for continued operation ; and activity was pro- 
portionately intense. The considerations that impress them- 
selves upon the Director from this comparison of experiences 
are these: — The population of the locality of Dilboy field five 
years ago was such that it included fewer children of play- 
ground age; fewer families altogether; fewer families whose 
children remained in Somerville during the Summer season; 
and fewer persons who had sufficiently grasped the advantages 
of fully utilizing supervised playgrounds, than any other local- 
ity in Somerville. Since then, however, the general popula- 
tion of the locality has much increased with the rapid build- 
ing of homes there; children too young to attend playgrounds 
five years ago have arrived at the playground age ; more fami- 
lies with children at home in Summer months have taken resi- 
dence in the locality; and the advantages of playgrounds at- 
tendance and supervision have impressed themselves on the 
general public in considerable degree in the past several 
years. 

The Director expects that in another season the Dilboy 
Field Playground will advance even more ; and that in a short 
time it will be among the most active and most serviceable 
units in the system. The momentum acquired during the 1924 
season, the increased advantage of experienced supervision, 
and the interest and appreciation of the children served, are 
the considerations on which this expectation is based. 

The Morse School Playground is another that provided 
wholesome play conditions and supervision for a large num- 
ber of children in a locality hitherto not reached by any of 
the play centers and very much in need of a playground be- 
cause of its congested nature and the danger from automobile 
traffic through Summer Street. Tt has the unique advantage 
of sufficient shade from trees which give attractive shelter 
from the oppressive Summer heat. This feature and the 
nearness of this ground to the homes of s^o many children 
made the Morse Center one of the most serviceable of the 



WELFARE AND IlECREATION COMMISSION'. 391 

syvste^rn in i)ro})()rtion to its arcM. Tlie erection of a hij^li screen 
fence along one side of tlie j»r()un(l, and the removal of the 
old fence which diviihMl the area into halves, as recommended 
in the annual report of the Director of Playgrounds, 192:^, 
have had a stimulating effect in active play and have served 
to protect the property that abnts the play area. 

There is need, however, of resurfacing this playground. 
One section was formerly surfaced with concrete, which is 
now higher by inches tlian the remainder of the area ; and 
that ])art which is not concreted is uneven and stony, with 
here and there uncovered parts of tree roots. Another screen 
fence along the second side which private property abuts, 
is almost a necessity both from the standpoint of the play- 
ground and for the interest of the abutting property. 

The Joy Street Playground for boys, located within 150 
yards of the Bennett School grounds where a boys' and girls' 
playground has been operated for several years past under 
extremely congested conditions, was inaugurated into the sys- 
tem with a view to (a) relieving the congestion at the Ben- 
nett ])layground, (b) segregating the girls from the boys and 
(c) providing conditions less inadequate for the more active 
games of the older playground boys. In addition to realiza- 
tion of these objectives, a considerable increase in attendance 
has characterized these two playgrounds in combination and 
great interest in inter-playground competitive games has been 
aroused among boys who previously had not enjoyed this fea- 
ture of the Summer program. 

The surface of the Joy Street grounds has been some- 
what improved by operations by the City Engineer's Depart- 
ment, some permanent equipment installed, and a drinking 
fountain provided. But there is imperative need of still fur- 
ther im])rovement of the ground, providing of shade trees, and 
the erection of a durable screen fence for the triple purpose 
of protecting the children at play from the extreme danger of 
intense commercial traffic through the adjoining streets 
(which are among the narrowest in the City), protecting 
neighboring property, and affording a touch of attractiveness 
to the grounds which at present have a most cheerless and 
unattractive appearance. 

Even under conditions of great improvement the total 
area of the Joy and Bennett playgrounds is so small that the 
provisions would be extremely inadequate for this locality, 
which has a greater child population within the immediate 
vicinity of the playground than can be found in any other dis- 
trict of similar size in the City. It seems, therefore, that the 
CJity would do well to make some approach to providing at- 
tractive, safe, and play-provoking features on the present area, 



;il)2 ANNUAL REl'ORTS. 

and to consider seriously the possibilities of increasing Qr 
even multiplying the area of both of these playgrounds. 

At the grounds o1 the Western .Junior High School, 
where the area affords possibiiiiies for tlie pUiy of active 
games, })ut wliere the City has long delayed in providing pre- 
sentable surface and any pUiy ecpiipment, a playground unit 
was nevertheless attemi)ted, to meet in feel)le degree the needs 
of an ever increasing poi)ulation in a district where no ]day- 
ground suitable for active boys' play is nearer than a mile 
almost in any dii-ection. The Western l*layground for boys 
and the Hodgkins School-yard unit for girls \yere jointly su- 
pervised. The combination proved effective in spite of the 
wretched condition of the boys' playground. 

A most pressing recreational need is the early comple- 
tion of this playground at the Western Junior High School. 

Elqually desirable, in my o])ini()n, would be the carrying 
out of plans contemplated some tinie since for the improve- 
ment of the rear end of Saxton (\ Foss Park, with a view to 
getting the maximum use from this area for recreation pur- 
poses. In the light of the rapid development of recreation 
activity on this playground, the urgent need of early atten- 
tion to this im])rovement is still more apparent. 

Saxton (\ Foss and Fellsway Playgrounds are in fact 
conducted on the same area, with segregation and separate 
supervision of boys and girls for sectioning off' the area. The 
attendance and the activities have so increased as to place both 
the girls' and boys' units among the most successful play- 
grcmnds. 

The attention of the Commission is again respectfully 
called to the necessity of more space for playing in the dis- 
trict served by the Kent St. playground. This ground caters 
to a very populous section of our city, and is at present in- 
adecpuite for the playing of active games. 

The notable develo])ment of the Central Hill unit has 
taken place in spite of the lack of any ])ermanent e(iuipment. 
In view of the importance of this unit, 1 strongly urge that 
before the coming Suiumer, provision be made for some per- 
manent apparatus on (Vntral Hill Paik. T believe that such 
equipment can be located on the rear part of the hill, without 
injuring, in any way, the sightliness of the location. 

The Playground at Tufts Old Campus was originated 
and financed in greater part not by the City, through this 
Department, but through the pi-ivate initiative and enter- 
prise of citizens in the upper Clarendon Hill section, led by 
the Mothers' (circle. These ladies provided and paid a super- 
visor, enlisted the interest of i)arents and children and sought 
assistance and encouragement from the Public Welfare and 



WKLFAKK AM) IIK( 'ftKATK ).\ COMMISSION, ?>^ 

Recreation Department. By this incorporation of the activi- 
ties of this playground into the City- wide system maintained 
under the Commission, mutual strength was afforded both 
the system and the project of the Mothers' Circle. In this 
enterprise a third cooperating agency was tlie Trustees of 
Tufts College, who in public-spiritedness granted the use of 
an attractive, ample and suitable section of its grounds. 

Supervision 

Twenty-two persons including the Director were em- 
ployed in the supervision of the Summer play. Of this number 
nineteen were assigned to individual playgiounds : one acted 
a.s a special supervisor of folk dancing; and one gave part 
time to supervision of handwork. All but one of the super- 
visors are residents of Somerville. This statement is made to 
indicate that despite the Civil Service requirements as to quali- 
fications, it is possible to secure from our own residents effi- 
cient supervision. From acquaintance with the conditions in 
other municipalities like ours, it can be stated that such was 
not the case in those places. The Director feels that this poli- 
cy should be continued in Somerville unless its continuance 
should, in any way, handicap the effects of the playground 
organization. 

Attendance 

Mention has already been made of large and regular 
attendance at all the playgrounds, with a significant uniform- 
ity throughout each week and throughout the season on any 
given playgrcmnd. The City-wide aggregate attendance this 
season, partly because of the increased number of play units^ 
was greater than that of the 1928 season by about twenty- 
five per cent ; and the same is true of the average daily attend- 
ance. Most noticeable in increased attendance among the 
older playgrounds was the Perry School grounds. 

Noteworthy in connection with the attendance has been 
the increased number of larger boys — those of fourteen and 
fifteen years of age. The Director feels that there may be' 
«ome connection between the increased attendance of this; 
group of boys and the methods used for stimulating attend- 
ance, which are to be mentioned in the following paragraphs^ 
and some further connection between this increase and the 
attempt to correlate Junior High School out-of-class activities 
and Playgrounds activities. The presence in goodly numbers 
of these larger bo^^s is reported as important in the judgment 
of the Director because of their power of leadership and ex- 



^94 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

-ample aiuong the younger boys. The propensity to imitate 
their seniors is the most characteristic trait of playground 
boys, and the ])i'esence or absence of older boys determines or 
colors the methods used by supervisors on our Play Centers. 

To stimulate attendance at, and interest in, the play- 
grounds, several methods and devices for propaganda were 
vigorously employed both during the season and in the weeks 
immediately preceding it. During the closing week of the 
public school term, in June, the Director of Playgrounds 
visited three of the Junior High Schools of the city and sev- 
eral of the Elementary Schools located in districts tributary 
to the play centers for the purpose of impressing upon the 
boys and girls of these schools the advantage of the Summer 
Playgrounds. Through the courtesy and co-operation of the 
school authorities, hundreds of boys and girls had their in- 
terest in the playgrounds awakened or renewed or intensi- 
fied, and it is the opinion of the Director that the experi- 
ment was proportionately successful in its influence upon the 
Summer attendance, spirit and activity. 

Other devices to the same end will be mentioned among 
the playground activities elsewhere in this report. They in- 
clude the use of bulletin boards at the play centers the pub- 
lishing of results of athletic contests, and the personnel of 
athletic teams, etc. 

Activities 

In reporting on the activities ccmducted on the play- 
grounds, for purpose of clearness, the activities may be 
grouped under six heads and distinguished as Oames, Hand- 
Tvork, Dancing, Safety Campaign, Miscellaneous Activities, 
and Special Events including the Final Play Festival and 
Display of Handwork. 

GAMES. The y)rincii)al portion of a playground program 
conii)rises active games and athletics. Baseball has, since 
the beginning, occupied the leading position among the boys 
of our Summer playgrounds. But track and field athletics 
have in 1924 taken a place of equal importance in their in- 
terest. Basketball, Volley Ball, Dodge Ball, Squash Ball, 
German Bat Ball and other more modern active games involv- 
ing team play and competition, held important place in the 
season's activities. 

These latter games were played by girls as well as boys ; 
and among both sexes inter-playground contests among repre- 
sentative teams were held in all of these games. 



WKI.FAKK AX1» RK( 'RKA'IIOX COM MISSION. 395 

Quoits, tennis at Foss Park, and the usual variety of 
ring games for both boys and girls enjoyed great popularity. 
And a long list might be made of miscellaneous games, vary- 
ing on the various playgrounds, some new and some very old, 
the playing of which has taken up quite as much of the chil- 
dren's time as have the better known games already men- 
tioned. Etfort has been made by the Supervisors to stimulate 
play of new games of an ever-increasing number, in the theory 
that novelty and variety are important in any effort to keep 
playgrounds attractive. 

To this end systematic study has been made of games, 
old and new, suitable to the varying conditions of play areas, 
weather, time of day, safety, physical development, charac- 
ter development, ages of children. Exchange of ideas among 
supervisors, demonstration of new games, and other devices 
tending to capitalize all the experiences and resources of all 
the supervisors, have been practiced in the method of admin- 
istering the pla.y supervision. This has been done by means 
of supervisors' conferences, inter-playground visits, by chil- 
dren prepared to demonstrate, weekly reports of all super- 
visors on the week's activities, and by the circulation, among 
supervisors, of lists of games, etc. 

BA^FjBALL. As in previous seasons, three baseball leagues, 
each with a season schedule of inter-playground games, pro- 
vided the central attraction in baseball. These leagues were 
for boys of three distinct classes, classification being by age. 
In each league eight playgrounds were represented, making 
a total of twenty-four teams participating in the inter-play- 
ground contests. Each team had fourteen games on its league 
schedule. 

Tn addition to the schedule of inter-playground games, 
there was even more activity in baseball independently of the 
leagues. The boys skilful enough to "make" the teams repre- 
senting their respective play centres comprised but a small 
percentage of the total number highly active in this sport. 
Other organized teams existed on various playgrounds; and 
rivalry among teams of the same section was quite as keen 
as that manifested in the City- wide circuits. And still in ad- 
dition, the number of improvised matches, was, of course, in- 
numerable. 

TRACK ATHLETICS. Track and field athletics engaged the 
interest throughout the season of large groups of boys, and 
had the important value of interesting many boys who failed 
to gain membership on any of the league teams in baseball. 



306 ANNUAL BBPORTS 

The interest was stimulated and kept at high pitch through- 
out the vseason by means of competitive athletic meets, local, 
dual, and inter-playground. Each of the seven playgrounds 
for boys had a local athletic meet for its boys on a day ap- 
pointed by schedule, at the beginning of the season. And 
the Central Hill playground boys held their meet at Lincoln 
Park. These meets were held during the middle week of the 
season. Shortly after mid-season, several dual meets were 
hold, and later still the final inter-playground meet, in which 
all playgrounds were eligible for representation, furnished 
the climax to this form of activity. The final meet was held 
at Dilboy Field and attended by hundreds of boys and girls 
from every unit in the playground organization. The assem- 
blage of so many hundreds of boys and girls from every sec- 
tion of the city made this a gala day. The keen interest in the 
competition for scores, and the presence of many adult specta- 
tors including His Honor, the Mayor, members of the Board 
of Aldermen and School Committee, the Superintendent of 
Schooks and other public oflftcials furnished an afternoon of 
enthusiasm. 

In all of the athletic meets the boys were grouped in 
three classes, by ages, corresponding to the classes in the base- 
ball leagues. In the Senior Class, Fellsway boys were the 
winners. In the Intermediate Class, Fellsway and Kent tied, 
and in the Junior class, Lincoln Park won. For the highest 
score in the meet, reckoned on the scoring of all three classes 
combined, Lincoln Park was awarded the championship. 

The series of meets, thus arranged to sustain the in- 
terest throughout the season and to intensify it as the climax 
— the final meet — approached, may be said not only to have 
accomplished this end but to have had several important by- 
products. There is little doubt, at least among observers 
of this program, that not only interest, but skill and pro- 
ficiency as w^ell, in one or another form of track or field 
athletics has been developed in many boys who will con- 
tinue their participation in this exercise, both on the play- 
gi'ounds in the near future and in more conspicuous degree 
under other auspices in the years that follow their play- 
ground days. But beyond even this immediate effect upon the 
more successful participants is the still more valuable effect 
on the children in general, to whom the playgrounds were sure- 
ly more attractive because of the spectacular nature of these 
competitive games and because of the enthusiastic prepara- 
tion with which they are anticipated. And another value that 



WELFARE AM) RECREATIOX CO.M M ISSIOX. 397 

must be attributed to these games arises from 

in BLICITY the publicity possibilities tlioy all'ord. When 

THROUGH playground bulletin boards and daily and 

ATHLETICS weekly newspapers present the results, the 

names of the winners, and the achien'emejits 
credited to the respective playgrounds, stimulus comes not 
only to this particular activity but to every phase of the play 
program, of which track and field athletics are one feature. 
And when forecasts and predictions concerning future con- 
tests are made, when prizes are publicly displayed in advance, 
boys are encouraged to redouble their efforts for personal suc- 
cess and victory for their own units. And perhaps most im- 
portant of all is that, through this same publicity, these con- 
tests become a ])ublic medium of information to the people 
of the Community, who are thus pos.sessed of the knowledge of 
playground doings and who, in turn, become agents for en- 
couraging the children to attendance and active participa- 
tion. It can be demonstrated, too, tliat enjoyment is afforded 
these adults, who in large number follow the sports of the chil- 
dren. 

The effect on public interest, arising from this feature 
of the playground season, is exemplified, as we have said, by 
the voluntary establishment of a fund for prizes, (m the part 
of a group of citizens including local business men and mer- 
chants. About |235 was donated, making possible the pur- 
chase of most attractive prizes for the final meet and a large 
number of more modest but much coveted trophies for win- 
ners in the local playground meets: — 432 prizes in all. 

OTHER JXTER-PLAY GROUND CONTEHTF^. Quoit tour- 
naments between playgrounds, frequent inter-playground 
Basket Ball, Dodge Ball and Bat Ball games, some for boys 
and some for girls, contributed also to the inter-playground 
rivalry. 

Among the girls, singing games and the more quiet ring 
games were the most popular. 

HANDWORK. Handwork of various kinds was highly popu- 
lar on all playgrounds, more especially among the girls. The 
liandwork produced on the playgrounds during the Summer 
of 1924 excelled in quantity and quality that made during any. 
previous season. This feature of our undertaking received 
much favorable comment, both from casual visitors at the 
playgrounds and from the general public, when at the close 
of the season it was publicly exhibited. 



398 ANNUAL REl'ORTS 

During the final week of the playground season the hand- 
work was publich' exhibited for the inspection of residents 
of the community. This exhibition was located during the 
day and evening of the Twilight Play Festival in an open-air 
booth connected with the store of Morrison Brothers opposite 
Central Hill Park, on which the Festival was held. Pre- 
viously the exhibit was located for periods of several days 
each, in the show windows of the Belcher Company in Union 
Square, and the Parke Snow Company in Davis Square. 
Thousands of people inspected these exhibitions and expressed 
considerable praise at the character and finish of the articles 
displayed. Included among the products were: serving trays 
constructed of reed and glass, and ornamented with butter- 
flies and milk weed; baskets, sewing boxes, desk sets, paper 
dolls very attractively dressed in crepe paper gowns and 
hats of the pastel shades, vases, hammocks, sweaters, dresses, 
hats for actual wear : aprons, embroidery pieces, including 
luncheon sets, towels, sofa pillows, centerpieces, scarfs, bibs, 
kites made b}^ the boys, stufl:'ed animals, paper cut-outs, scrap 
books, and articles of paste-board construction. 

DANCING. Folk dancing continued to be the main attrac- 
tion for many girls in various sections. As in the case of the 
handwork, this activity was supervised by a young lady em- 
ployed for that purpose. This activity made a favorable im- 
pression at the public demonstration at the festival held dur- 
ing the closing w^eek. 

In the opinion of the Director, the results obtained in 
the dancing are most commendable. Commendation from all 
sides has, in fact, been heard. These results are in spite of 
the great handicap resulting from the lack of musical accom- 
paniment on many grounds. 

Provision of some musical accompaniment for the dancing 
is strongly urgerl for the coming year. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIA^ITIES. Of special interest, this 
season, was the maintenance of bulletin boards on each play- 
ground. Items of interest, programs, results of games, base- 
l)all league standings, notices of coming events, names of play- 
ers, contestants, winners, etc., were i)osted frcmi time to time. 
Attention to use of these bulletins was practiced through the 
season b}^ the supervisors, and it is certain that this device 
was a prominent factor in keeping up the interest. The bulle- 
tin boards alforded the added advantage of attracting and in- 
forming the adult passers-by — for many of our play areas 
are also thoroughfares for pedest rains — and this circum- 
stance secured additional public interest in the work. 



WELFARE AND IHOiMlKATIOX ( 'O.M .M ISSIOX. 399 

Among other miscellaneous activities should be inen- 
tioued kite ll.ying, gymnastics, story telling, use of library 
books, enjoyment of swings, teeters and slides, and the "Safe- 
ty" activities which are mentioned in the following para- 
graphs. 

"SAFETY" CAMPAIGN. A new major Summer activity was 
inaugiii-at(Ml the past season : a sustained campaign for "Safe- 
ty", especially as applied to prevention of higliway accidents. 
Emphasis of this movement called for much of the time and 
attention of tlie supervisory ('()r])s, and tlie Director is decided- 
ly of the conviction that the impression produced upon the 
children has been considerable, though such results are neces- 
sarily ditlicult to measure. This activity was occasioned in 
part by the concentrated activities of the Somerville Safety 
('ouncil, wliose war on Street xVccidents in Somerville had be- 
gun just previous to the opening of the Summer Playgrounds? 
season. 

The means employed for inculcating "safety" habits were 
varied and many. In general the "safety" activities of the 
supervisors were interwoven through the season into the whole 
activity of comradeship with and leadership of the children. 
A few of the more specific and more definable means used to 
attain the objectives of the campaign are here pointed out : — 

Occasional informal discussion of the traffic dangers to 
children, the need of caution on the highways, the force of 
habit in this connection, the perils attending well known 
"dare-devil" adventures of children with regard to vehicles., 
and the place of the playground as preventive of accidents,, 
were launched by the supervisors on their respective play- 
grounds. 

The slogan of the Safety Council — "Be Cafeful" was kept 
in continued presence of the eyes and ears of playground chil- 
dren. 

Pamphlets, illustrated, on "Common Accidents", pointing^ 
out the ways to avoid these accidents, were distributed with 
exhortation that they be taken home and read by parents and 
children. 

Posters were widely displayed at play centers. These 
included the imposing "Be Careful" placards provided by the 
local Safety Council. 

Playground Bulletin Boards displayed" from week to 
week lists of accidents in Somerville during the preceding: 
week, compiled by the Police Department and published by 
the Somerville Journal, giving the facts and circumstances. 
On these bulletin boards were displayed various other clip- 
pings and illustrations calculated to serve the same end. 



400 AXXIAI. Tii: PORTS 

Two great ^'Safety" mass meetings of children were held, 
featuring Motion Picture films teaching the safety lesson ; 
iiddresses by leaders in the state- wide Safety movement and 
local police officials ; a <lTamati7>ati()ii of a typical street acci- 
flent, with a strong ap])eal to children, and arranged and pro- 
duced by the children theniselvi^s under the guidance of a 
i-oniniittee of supervisors. These mass meetings attracted in 
the aggregate about 1()00 children from 15 playground units. 
They were held in the Union Square and Ball Sqiiare Thea- 
tres, l)y consent and cooperation of the management without 
ciny ex])ense to the City or the children. 

SPECIAL E^'^]XTS. Certain occasional special events are 
to be mentioned as factors in the work. Among these are 
Visiting Days for Parents, Outings for children of one play- 
ground or another at near-by Kecreation Resorts, the Final 
Intei'-Playground Track Meet, the "Safety'' Special assem- 
I)lies, and the Twilight Play Festival. 

l'L()SIX(f PLAY FESTIVAL. The closing festival held on 
the Wednesday evening of the final week of the season, at twi- 
light, was calculated to serve a four-fold ])urp()se, namely, 

1 . Tlu^ purpose suggested by its nanrfe. 

1\ To demonstrate organized play to the public, and 

exhibit its results, with a view to securing wider public in- 
terest. 

o. To encourage the children in their play activities, 

and to provide free public recreation for adults. 

4. To gf\'e th(^ children an opportunity to repay the 
community in part for the benefits they had received from 
the supervised playgrounds. ^ 

The Festival attracted several thousands of the public 
in addition to the three thousand five hundred boys and girls 
who participated in the twenty events on the program. It 
was conducted on Central Hill park, in the area in front of 
the High School Buildings and the City Hall Annex. The 
program of events included competitive games for boys and 
girls, folk dancing, accompanied by music furnished by a brass 
band : relay races, marches, drills, a doll carriage parade, and 
si procession of Ihe i>articipating children. 

Tills iM'siival fni'iiislKMl a lilting closi^ to the playground 
r^cason. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 401 



Finances 

Tlie total ('X])eii(litiire I'roiii tlj(^ ^'ity Treasury for the 
Siniimer l*]ay^roiiiids program under your (Commission wavS 
|2,8(>5.58. Of this amount the exi)ense of supervision was 
f 1,877.50, not including salary paid to the Director during 
the Summer, which is elsewhere included as a part of the all- 
year item of Director's salary; for supplies, maintenance and 
labor, 1988.08. 

In this connection, it seems a])})i'()]U'iate to point out that 
relatively little expense has been incurred this past season 
(or the preceding one) through purchase or installing of 
permanent playground e(piipment. The Somerville Play- 
grounds Association has been of great financial assistance in 
])roviding such ecpupment for some years past, particularly 
on those areas not under control of the City Engineer's De- 
])artment. 

Further financial assistance came, of course, from the 
fact that tlie cost of supervision at the Tufts Old Campus 
playground was met by the Mothers' Circle. 

As a result of these facts, and of the additional fact that 
new equipment and repairing of old equipment must be pro- 
vided to cope with the results of wear and <leterioration 
through several years, it seems wise to point out here that 
in anticipating the year 1925 from the financial standpoint 
a fairly substantial increase in expenditure for equipment, 
and for City supervision of the Tufts unit, mu^t be consider- 
ed. And at this point, too, the Director, regarding finances, 
calls attention to tlie possibility of still additional cost in- 
volved in the proposed increase of number of playgrounds to 
be operated in the Summer and at other seasons. This in- 
crease is pro|)osed in the series of Recommendations later in 
this report. 



Co-operation 

Most encouraging i« the assistance from agencies otlier 
than the department in direct charge of supervivsed recreation. 
This co-operation manifested itself in various ways. A few 
instances will be mentioned. 

The Fire Department officials were accommodating and 
sent to the playgrounds hose wagons equipped with spray 
iK^zzles on extremely waini days, to provide shower baths for 
the children. 



402 AXXl'AL r.HroRTs 

The Departments conducted by the City Engineer, the 
Hnilding Commissioner, the Water Commissioner, and others 
which are closely connected with the playground management^ 
rendered courteous and valuable assistance, not only when 
called upon, but frequently on their own voluntary initiative. 

The Public Library placed at the disposal of the Sum- 
mer playgrounds a large deposit of books, suitable for the 
children, furnishing an additional source of recreation, and at 
the same time a medium for i)ronioting the interest of chil- 
dren in a very profitable diversion — the reading of good books. 

The Somerville Playgrounds Association, as in the past, 
has been a valuable source of assistance to the Summer work, 
l)urchasing permanent equipment costing f 250 ; encouraging 
the work; and loaning the moncn' for the initial purchaseof 
liandwork materials. 

The merchants and business men, in the several sections 
of the city, cheerfully donated prizes, or gave other valuable 
assistance to individual playgrounds and contributions to the 
Prize Fund, and to the entire organization, on various occa- 
vsions during the season. The supplying of tracks for transpor- 
tation of children to the track meet and to outings is an ex- 
ample in point, and another is the gi'anting of display windows 
for the handwork exhibit. 

The Managements of Motion Picture Theatres in Somer- 
ville — without a single exception^ — have entered into coopera- 
tion. Publicity by screen slides was used to stimulate atten- 
dance, to interest the public and th(^ children in the approach 
of the track meets and the Play Festival. 

To a striking degree, there was noted this Summer, a de- 
gree of participation in play activities by the adult members 
of the community. For example : many mothers came for 
long periods during afternoons to the Morse, Saxton C^. Foss, 
Central Hill, Kent Street and Hodgkins Playgrounds, to 
mingle with the children, and even assisted in the actual 
supervision of the grounds. 

The Somerville Safety Council was always ready in its 
cooperation with the "Safety-' activities on the playgrounds. 
The Somerville Journal gave printed copies of its front-page, 
large type, weekly bulletins of accidents in Somerville, for 
])osting on Playground Bulletin Boards throughout the season. 

Recommendations — Summer Playgrounds 

Based on thoughtful studv and on more than twelve 
years of intimate and active experience with the playground 
situation in Somerville, the following recommendations for 
the future are submitted by the Director at this point, as be- 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 403 

longing most especially to the Summer season's interest; they 
will be included again in a series of recommendations later in 

this report, covering the general Recreation work of the en- 
tire year. Other reconiinendations prompted by experience 
in the Summer Playgrounds season of 1924, are purposely 
omitted at this ])oint and reserved, on the ground that they 
have application beyond the Summer season, for inclusion 
in the General Recommendations near the close of this Gener- 
al Report. 

1. The early completion of the Playground at the West- 
ern Junior High School. 

2. Improvement (and possibly) extension of the play- 
ground at Joy Street. 

3. Providing a playground on the vacant land (a large 
part of which is City property) at the junction of 
Oliver and Glen Streets, to serve a district that has 
a child population of several hundred residing with- 
in four minutes' walk of the grounds mentioned. 

4. Early completion of Saxton C. Foss Park, with a 
view to utilizing the lower end of it for athletic 
purposes. 

5. Resurfacing the playground at the Morse School; 
and completing the enclosure of the area by adding 
erection of a screen fence, on the easterly side, like 
that erected this past year on the southerly side. 

6. Installing of permanent framewoi-k for swings and 
teeters at the Morse Playground. 

7. The planting of shade trees on some of the play- 
grounds to provide a natural shelter for the future. 

8. Provision for a male supervisor at Central Hill play- 
ground to serve the athletic interests of the boys 
at that center and to give part time supervision 
to older boys' activities at the Morse playground in 
Summer. (No male supervisor has ever been assigned 
to either playground.) 

9. Operation in Summer of an additional unit on the 
grounds of the Union S(iuare branch of the Public 
Library. 



404 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

' After ail experiiuoiit in the late Autumn and Winter of 
102:*) in conduct of supervised play on Saturdays, the Public 
Welfare and Recreation Commission voted to adopt the plan 
of permanently extending beyond the Summer months its 
operations in tlie supervision of children's play. The experi- 
ment in Saturday playgrounds in 1923 was used as the basis 
of organization of a program calculated specificially to en- 
courage active play of children under eleven years of age: 
and still further expansion of the supervised play plan was 
begun by the launching of a program of after-school supervised 
athletics, this time with tlie aim o^" ser-ving the older boys and 
girls, — those of the Junior High School and High School age. 
For outlining the methods, the activities, and the results 
in both these fields, it may be well to emphasize first the dis- 
tinctive characteristics of each of these activities as they are 
to be difiPerentiated from each other and from the Summer 
activities. 

Specific Objectives 

Tn the Saturday Playgrounds supervision : 

(1) The "Xeighborhood Playgrounds" idea is empha- 
sizcHl, as expressed in the selection of smaller and 
less ])retentious play areas, close to the homes 
of children of districts somewhat limited in area, 
rather than the larger play centers, such as the 
public parks, which are intended to serve larger 
districts. 

(2) Special emphasis is given to the attempt to inter- 
est and provide activity for smaller children — thoee 
below eleven years of age. 

In the After-School supervised athletics : 

(1) More active and less varied, organized games, 
adapted to play by older boys and girls are encour- 
aged. 

(2) The larger areas, intended to serve larger districts 
are operated; and fewer units have therefore been 
organized. 

Saturday Playgrounds 

GROUNDS. Gradually, eight units of organized play have 
been under supervision. The playgrounds are enumerated 
here: 



WELFARE AND KECREATIOX COMM ISSIOX. 405 

FOR BOYH FOE GIRLS 

Prescott School (h-ouiids Prescott School Grounds 

Morse School Grounds Morse School Grounds 

Terry School Grounds Terry School Grounds 

Joy Street Playground Joy Street Playground 

(Boys under 8 years are welcomed on the Girls' Playgrounds.) 

It should be noted here that no Saturday playground 
has been located west of the summit of Spring Hill ; and 
that all units are located within an area constituting approx- 
imately only one-third of the City's total area ; and that all 
but those at the Morse School are located within one-quarter 
of Someryille. This limitation on the Saturday activities 
has been necessary because funds were not available for any 
expansion beyond the units above listed. One favorable cir- 
cumstance resulting from this condition presents itself : — -in 
the first year of development a smaller system could be more 
carefully developed and studied than a more extended one. 

The Director is decidedly of the conviction that the num- 
ber of Saturday playgrounds to be supervised in 1925 should 
be at least twice as great as the number supervised in 1924. 
There is a present demand on the part of childi'en and adults 
in several sections for added units. 

SUPERVISION. Eight supervisors have been employed, four 
male supervisors foi' the boys' units, and four female super- 
visors for the girls' units. With two exceptions, these super- 
visors ha\e previously been engaged in the same capacity on 
the Summer Playgrounds. The two excepted have fulfilled 
the Civil Service requirements for this work. 

ACTIVITIES. Tjie activities are similar to those of the Sum- 
mer Playgrounds though with the restrictions resulting from 
the smaller size and from the location of the Saturday Play- 
grounds, and from the difference in the average age of the 
children. 

SESSION. The session is three hours in length, — 9 :30 to 
12::^>. 

ESTIMATE OF RESULTS. This undertaking was new, and 
to some degree experimental. The outstanding conclusions, in 
the Director's judgment, follow : 

1. The Saturday Playground is entitled to a position 
of great importance in developing a Municipal Recreation 
program. 



406 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

2. The ''Neighborhood Playground" plan enlists the ac- 
tivity of quite as many children — though in a larger number 
of units — as does the Summer Playgrounds plan of organiza- 
tion, within the sections of the City thus far provided for. 

3. The "Neighborhood Playground" plan has the impor- 
tant merit that it reaches very many children who otherwise 
have not acquired tlie habit of utilizing the City's Playground 
facilities. 

4. The "Neighborhood Playground" plan enlists the 
more intimate interest of a great number of parents. 

5. The ''Neighborhood Playground" plan must result in 
a greater attendance on the large playgrounds later, inasmuch 
as it "educates" children in their early years to the Municipal 
Playground idea. 

6. The Saturday Playground plan contributes largely to 
a "carrying over" from summer to summer of the desirable re- 
sults obtained in following the objectives of the Playgrounds 
work. 



Afternoon Supervision 

Pur-suing the same policy of experimentation that had 
been followed in the Saturday Playground undertaking, an 
experiment was launched in the Sf>ring of 1924, in stimula- 
ting and supervising playground activities for the older boys, 
those of Junior High and High School ages. This undertak- 
ing was begun May 1 and continued until the close of the 
public school term. Two units for boys were in operation 
two afternoons a week in this Spring period, and, the Direc- 
tor reporting favorably on the results, the Commission voted 
the initiating of two units for girls of similar age, and these 
were launched 8e])tember 15th, when the supervision of the 
boys' units was resumed. The Autumn Supervision was con- 
tinued till Thanksgiving. No increase in the number of boys' 
units was recommended, because such increase was clearly 
beyond the possibilities of the Department's funds. And no 
increase in the number of sessions per week was recommended, 
for the same reason. 

GROUNDS. Fellsway Playground (involving portions of the 
lawn at Foss Park and the adjacent lot separated from the 
Park by Fellsway East) and Richard Trum Field were super- 
vised for boys: and Fellsway and Perry School Grounds for 
girls. 



WKLKAKK AXI) ItKCKEATlOX COMMISSION. ' 407 

SESSIONS. Supervision was coiiducted on Mondays and 
Thuisday>s at Fellsway for boys ; and on Tuesdays and Fri- 
days at Tmm Field. For tlie girls Wednesdays and Fridays 
were the days at Fellsway; and Tuesdays and Thursdays at 
Perry. Sessions were from three to six o'clock. 

A(nMVITIES. Although smaller children have been wel- 
comed at these play centers and encouraged in these activities 
wherever such encouragement has been incidentally possible, 
the attention of the supervisors has been devoted to such ac- 
tivities as involve team play and appeal to the older boys and 
girls. These, especially in the Fall term, have involved some 
athletic activities not appropriate to the Summer season,— 
notably Football and Soccer for boys, and Basketball, Soccer 
and Field Hockey for girls. Baseball in season, track athlet- 
ics, and other games played in the Summer have also been 
popular among the boys; and Dodge Ball, Bat Ball, etc., 
among the girls. 

Occasional inter-playground contests have been held and 
from the results here it seems wise to intensify this phase. 

ATTENDANCE. During the Spring term the attendance at 
sessions for boys averaged 110; and ranged from 85 to 200. 
Attendance figures at Fellsway were higher than at Trum 
Field. In the Fall term the average reached 130, with a 
range of 85 to 300. 

At the girls' centers, the development has been slower, — 
a condition which had been anticipated, in accordance with 
the Commission's theory that while there is great need, there 
is comparatively small demand for provisions for , recreation- 
al physical exercise for adolescent and post-adolescent girls. 
But while the attendance has been small in comparison with 
that of the boys, the interest among the girls has been keen, 
and there has been a steady, gradual increase of attendance. 

From these and other considerations, the Director con- 
clinles that a foundation has been laid in this new and highly 
desirable undertaking, and that the results are to be viewed 
in the light of the public apathy towards recreational , needs 
of the girls, and of the difficulties to be overcome. 

SUPERVISION. The four supervisors employed at these 
Centers were persons engaged in similar capacit}^ in the Sum- 
mer and Saturday organizations. In the girls' athletic ac- 
tivities one of the young women supervisors has been especial- 
ly trained for this kind of supervisory work at the Sargent 
School of Physical Education; and she has collaborated with 
the other young woman supervisor in ^such way as to bring to 
bear in both units the greatest possible value from her train- 
ing. ,; 



408 ANXTAL KKPOKTS. 

Finances — Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds. 

Expenditures in the tield of Saturday and at'ter-scboo] 
supervised play amounted to 11,100.01; of winch |1,033.1(> 
was expended for supervision, and |73.75 for supplies, etc. 

Recommendations — Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

The following recommendations regarding future con- 
duct of the Saturday' and Afternoon Supervised Play are re- 
spectfully submitted. They are repeated later in this report 
among the (Jreneral Kecomniendations concerning the Recrea- 
tion work as a whole : — 

1. Increasing the number of Saturday "Neighborhood'^ 
playground units, from 8 to at least 16, making this 
branch of the work City-wide in scope, beginning im- 
mediately with the Kent Street grounds. 

2. Increasing the number of units of boys' supervised 
after-school athletics fr(mi two to four. 

3. Similar increase for girls' units. 

4. Increasing the nund)er of sessions })er week at both 
girls' and boys' after-school playgrounds, — from two 
to three afternoons. 

5. Provision of the necessary field equipment for Ten- 
nis, Field Hockey, Soccer, etc. for use at these after- 
school sessions. 

Girls' Canning and Preserving Activities 

A most efiSciently administered and supervised branch 
of the undertaking of the Public Welfare and Recreation 
Commission is the activity among girls who occupy them- 
selves during spare time in Spring, Summer and Fall in the 
preserving of fruits, vegetables, etc. Though this branch is 
perhaps, less spectacular and is les« known ])ublicly, a high 
degree *^of efficiency in preserving has been attained among 
many girls of Somerville, whose ages range from 10 to 15 
years; and a highly enjoyable and profitable form of recrea- 
tion has be(^n provided them through the preserving oppor- 
tunities. 

This work has been carried on in 1924 more extensively 
than ever before. Girls were enrolled earlier and in larger 
number; and a larger numerical proportion of them com- 
pleted the season's exercises and requirements, as listed be- 
low. 



WKLFARK .\.\1» i;i:t KK.\'11().\ ( () M Al 1 SS! ()\. 409 

ORGANIZATION. To make the exercises attractive, tlie 
girls are organized into Clubs; each Club including girls who 
attend one of the Somerville public schools, and the Clubs 
are usually named for the School represented. The Schools 
whose m,enibers eni^olled in 1924 are the Brown, Cutler, 
Glines, Highland, Edgerlj, Pope, Proctor, Southern Junior 
High, Northeastern -iuinor Higii and the Westei'n Junior 
High. The Brown and Highland conducted a joint club, this- 
])ast Summer, under the name of Klever Kanning Klub. 

ENROLLMENT. One hundred twenty-three girls were en- 
rolled in the Clubs. 

CENTP:RS and sessions. The club from each school 
met one day each week during the Summer. The work was 
carried on at two centers, one in the Western Junior High 
School and the other in the Senior High School. Two in- 
structors were employed regularly five days a week. 

Sessions began at nine o'clock and continued until all 
the work of the day was finished. All materials were fur- 
nished by the pupils and the finished product taken home. 

COUNTY COOPERATION. The clubs were all enrolled with 
the County and State Bureaus of Domestic Science and Agri- 
culture. From these Bureaus, through their agents, the work 
in Somei-A^lle received valuable assistance in the form of ideas 
for holding the interest of individual children, pamphlets con- 
taining information as to the correct methods of preserving, 
etc. These agents also furnished each girl who finished first 
year work with an attractive Club pin ; each third-year girl 
a gold pin ; each second-year girl a silver pin ; and each fourth- 
year girl with a diploma. To each club in which every mem- 
ber completed the required work a banner was awarded. 

REQUIREMENTS. Girls entering the first year work are 
required to can 24 jars of fruit and vegetables. Second year 
girls must can 40 jars of fruit and vegetables and preserve 
jams and jellies. Third year girls can 60 jars of fruit and 
vegetables, 12 jars of jams and jellies and 5 jars of meat or 
fish. Fourth year girls plan the canning budget for the 
entire family. Every girl must keep a record of expense and 
at the end of the year give an exhibition of her work. 



410 ANNUAL REP'ORTS. 

EXHIBITION. On October 20, 1924, a central exhibition 
was held at the High School. About 500 jars were attractive- 
ly displayed. First, second and third prizes were given for 
the best work in each year of enrollment. Honorable men- 
tion was given to ten others. Over 75% of the parents of 
children enrolled in the clubs were present at the exhibition 
showing more decidedly than ever the widespread interest 
which is growing from year to year in this home-making 
work. 

I^INANCES. The total cost of carrying on this work was : 
^341.45, of wliicli nearly all was expended on salaries of su- 
pervisors. 

COOPERATION. It is largely due to the cooperation of prin- 
cipals and teachers that the high standard of work accorded 
the Somerville girl canners is maintained ; and the supervisors 
antd Director express their apj^reciation of this cordial cooper- 
ation. 

The supervisors of this work— Miss Estelle Crowe and 
Miss Margaret Brennan — have shown themselves remarkably 
well qualified for the work and extremely zealous and effici- 
ent in carrying it out. The Director takes this occasion to 
submit to the Commission a word in commendation of their 
■accomplishments during tlie 1924 season. 

Public Evening Recreation Centers 

The Public Evening Recreation Centers aim at profitable 
recreation — indoors — for adults. The scope of the work thus 
far has been limited to young men. No elaborate or in- 
tensive program has been carried out, because of a variety of 
reasons, which are here indicated. But in general summary 
the Director submits as his estimate that results have been 
proportionate to the City's financial expenditure (about 
^450.00 for the year) ; proportionate to the possibilities of 
an undertaking in which appropriate indoor recreation facili- 
ties are almost totally lacking and the workers in supervision 
all part-time or occasional workers ; and proportionate to 
the time during which this branch of the work has had oppor- 
tunity for evolution. 

The term Recreation itself, in the breadth and generality 
of its meaning, suggests the breadth and generality of the 
field of activity. To direct the leisure-time occupations of a 
large group of adults with their varied interests, aptitudes, 
desiies, temperaments, degrees of education, occupations. 



WELFAKK AND KE(^RKATION (COMMISSION. 411 

li()ine and social backgrounds, ages, — to cope witli all these 
and many other individual differences in such way as to 
arouse and sustain interest and ciystalize the resulting recre- 
ative expressions of them, is far from a simple task. To de- 
fine for itself a Municipal Department's own concept of worth- 
while indoor Recreation, to distinguish Recreation from mere 
pastime and again from mere pursuit of pleasure which is 
rather dissipative than recreative ; to interest and enthuse 
an apathetic public in this definition ; to devise practical ways 
and means for its application to the various communities 
within a City like ours, is obviously a complicated and most 
arduous task, for which any striking degree of success de- 
mands expert, persistent, sustained, thoughtful study and 
energetic activity. 

The primary reason why the present program under 
your Commission has not been elaborated or has not been 
spectacular in its accomplishments, is found in the lack of 
personnel, facilities, finances and experience brought to bear. 
A second reason is the apathy of the public. 

It will be generalh' agreed that proper recreation de- 
pends upon three f acl^ors : — 

1. The possession of leisure; 

2. The existence of adequate facilities ; and 

3. The knowledge of how to use the leisure and 
facilities. 

Concerning the lirst factor, as applied to the local situa- 
tion, no discussion is necessary. The embarkation by your 
Commission into adult recreation activity assumes the pres- 
ence of this factor. Concerning the other two factors, the 
Director submits the following analysis : — 

With facilities limited to four rooms in three school 
buildings, each open four hours a week, and each equipped for 
an entirely different purpose from ours ; with the psychologi- 
cal restraint that necessarily attends activity on another's 
carefully guarded premises; the field of recreational possibili- 
ties in our Evening Centers is extremel}^ limited. Again, the 
traditionally austere atmosphere that is suggested by a school- 
room — particularly as school buildings have long been re- 
garded in Somerville — is an impediment to the business of 
popularizing even these limited facilities. Furthermore even 
within the possibilities which still remain, competent super- 
vision of activities in any variety to meet the varying tastes 
and interest of those attracted, requires a versatility in the 
supervisor which can come only with broad experience. To 



4:.ill - AXXIAL Ki:rOLT:-. 

pay such supervisoi*s no fund is at present available; and no 
successful means has been devised of securing applicants for 
positions in our system. 

Regarding the third factor, namely knowledge of how 
to use the leisure and tlie facilities, it may be stated that here 
one approaches the essence of the task undertaken under your 
Commission : — to promote leisure time interests in the indi- 
vidual, to acquaint the individual with the facilities, to organ- 
ize activities in such way as to classify persons of similar 
tastes and interests, to make proportionate time allotments 
for various activities ; to counteract the influences of present- 
day dissi])ating ])leasur('s and pastimes ; to do these with- 
out pehuitry and without destroying the freedom and initia- 
tive of the individual, in short, without making work of play. 
The Director submits that this task demands thorough and 
thoughtful study of the respectixe communities in which the 
Centers are located (no two Communities are alike) ; repeated 
interviews with individuals and small groups ; selection and 
encouragement of leaders in recreational activities ; a con- 
siderable amount of correspondence requiring time and cleri- 
cal work : and a variety of other local contacts. In brief, the 
Director submits, the greater part of the business of con- 
ducting Adult Recreation Centers must, for success, be car- 
ried on not at the actual sessions of recreation hours nor in 
the Recreation Center itself, but rather all through the week 
and the year (especially between sessions and previous to the 
beginning of the season by way of preparation) and throtigh- 
out the whole Communities served. Tt is a complicated task 
in applied sociology. 

To meet this task what provision has the City made? 

1. All the workers employed, including the Director^ 
are ])art-time workers. 

2. Of these all but the Director are paid only for ser- 
\'ices in the actual four hours a week in which the 
Centers are open ; all other service by them is volun- 
tary in their own spare time, and is thus irregularly 
intermittent. 

3. The Director, who is charged with ultimate responsi- 
bility for the held work in these centers, is a part- 
time worker whose duties include, in addition to 
those here discussed, those connected with all the 
other bi-anches of the work under the Commission 
included in the scope of this General Report. 

4. No provision has been made for special assistance 
in the clerical, statistical, correspondence and pub- 
licity work that has been indicated as fundamental- 
ly necessary to success in this field. 



WELFARE AM) liECKEATH )\ ( "OM M ISSION. 413 

It is upon tliese considerations and upon the natural dif- 
iiculty of overcoming the unfamiliarity of the Somerville Pub- 
lic with the objectives, that your Director bases the original 
statement that the results seem to be proportionate, at least, 
to the expenditure, the facilities, and the time the undertak- 
ing has had to evolve itself. 

CENTERS. The three centers are located in the buildings 
of the Bennett, Bingham and Morse Schools. In each build- 
ing a room (a double room at the Bennett Center), used dur- 
ing the day by children of the lower primary grades, is at the 
disposal of the young men in attendance, with sessions from 
7 :80 to 9 :3(). two evenings each week. The evenings vary 
with the various centers. A piano is available at each. 

ATTENDANCE. The average attendance for all centers has 
been thirty young men an evening, with a maximum attend- 
ance of 175 at the Bingham; 85 at the Bennett, and 05 at the 
Morse. The average age of those in attendance has been 19 
year-s. The minimum age for participation is 17 years. Very 
few above the age of twenty-one have been attracted, though 
it has not been the intention to restrict the activity for the 
benefit of youths. 

ACTIVITrES. Since the whole enterprise has not passed the 
experimental nature, the program of activities is still in pro- 
cess of evolution. Naturally, a diversity is found among the 
local communities to which the centers cater ; and according- 
ly there is a diversity in the nature of the activities. 

Among the activities carried on may be mentioned: 

1. Group singing and the organization of Glee Clubs. 

2. Some reading. 

8. Table games, puzzles and pastimes. 

4. Half-hour "talks" by prominent athletes. 

5. Discussion of current topics of interest, as radio. 
f>. Indoor athletics (in the Bingham School only). 

7. Informal, unpretentious, improvised entertainments. 

8. Whist and checker tournaments. 

9. An orchestra. 

10. Initial steps in developing activities in drama. 

11. Debating. 

12. A movement to arouse interest a;nd organization 
leading to out-of-door activities, after the indoor 
season, among the same young men, and their 
friends, who frequent the indoor centers. This 
movement has taken on momentum lately and has 



•414 axxl'a:. i:i:rc)i:TS. 

crystal izrd itself in the primary steps in organiza- 
tion of a baseball league for Somerville young men, 
to coinineiK-e operation the coming Summer. Six 
teams have already been entered, and the members 
and followers of each have held occasional meetings 
in the buildings where the centers are located in 
the hours of the center sessions. Some of the teams 
have conducted recreational enterprises, such as 
whist parties, to finance the outfitting of the base- 
ball teams, and in this way they have provided recre- 
ation for parents and friends in their respective 
communities ; and have also enlisted the interest of 
persons in those communities in the Recreation Cen- 
ters and in the general program of the Public Wel- 
fare and Eecreation Department. 

SrPEKVISION. In the conduct of this undertaking three 
persons besides the Director have been employed for supervis- 
ion ; one being a Supervisor of one center, one a leader in the 
musical activities in all three centers, and one a general as- 
sistant employed according to need in one center or another. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. The following recommendations 
concerning the Evening Recreation Outers are submitted, 
based on study and analysis of the present situation. They 
will be included again in the (leneral Recommendations near 
the close of this general report. 

1. Provision for additional facilities for indoor athlet- 
ics and ])hysical exercise in all the centers. 

li. Eni])loynient of special leaders for special activities, 
such as dramatics, instrumental music, debating^ 
handcraft, etc. 

3. Provision for securing (through Civil Service post- 
ing and publication or otherwise! applicants for su- 
pervisory positions in such numbers and from per- 
sons of such training or experience that the Com- 
mission may have an opportunity of selection to ap- 
point highly competent persons for this work. 

4. l*rovision for clerical assivStance to carry out the 
publicity, statistical and correspondence work that 
have been indicated above as necessary to the suc- 
cess of this work. 

5. Financial ])rovision for more emphatic presentation 
to the public of th^ objectives, possibilities and op- 
portunities in connection with these Recreation Cen- 
ters. 



welfakp: a\i> keckeatiox co.m mission. 415 

The Anne McCarthy Neighborhood Center 

In the Welfare and Recreation work at the Anne Mc- 
Carthy Neighborliood Center on Maple St., Ward 1, an im- 
])()rtnnt clian^e has taken place in 11)24, constitnting one of 
the ontstanding features of the whole undertaking, for the 
\i'i\r under the (Commission. 

Tiie general aim in the work conducted for several years 
at this neighborhood has been to provide, within limited 
means, the most feasible and most desirable features of a So- 
cial Center as applied to an immediate locality. Not merely* 
Kecreation in the strict sense of that term, but other objec- 
tives of social and family and community welfare have been 
included within this aim. The undertaking has included ac- 
tivity among both adults and children, day and evening, all 
seasons of the year; and has been to some degree linked up 
with the strictly young men's activities at the Recreation^ 
(Vnter (Bennett) which has been discussed above, and which 
in a sense iiiay be regarded as a part of the neighborhood cen- 
ter undertaking. 

An essential feature in the plan of administration of this 
Center is that it is maintained only in part by the City. The 
enterprise was originally launched, and is still largely main- 
tained, under control of the Federated Women's Clubs of 
Somerville through their joint Committee on Ways and 
Means. With succeeding years the City through your Com- 
mission has gradually entered further into the work, until at 
present it is probably accurate to state that the undertakings 
is shared ecpially by the City and the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. Payment of salary to the general supervisor there m 
dividcMl equally between the two agencies. Physical mainte- 
nance of the premises is mainly at the City's expense; while 
most of the portable and incidental equipment has been pro- 
vided by the Women's organization. 

For some time previous to May 1, 1924, this center had 
been located in a small, old-fashioned and considerably worn 
dwelling-house that had been reclaimed and meagerly repaired 
for the purpose of the Center. This house was located on Maple 
St., opposite the Clark Bennett Schoolhouse. Tt was private- 
ly owned and a rental was charged. 

In May, 1924, the Center was transferred to the school 
building across the street, where the City through the Depart- 
ment of Public Buildings had renovated the basement floor 
in such a way as to provide a suite of rooms in which to house 
the ordinary activities of the Center, and where, on the floor 
above, other facilities including the double room are available 
for special activities : where the cost of renovation is partly 
offset by the saving in rental cost and fuel ; and where the 



41 (i ANNUAL liEl'ORTS. 

coiucidence of the placement of the young men's Recreation 
Center, the children's playground (in the school yard), and 
these activities involving other elements of the locality \s popu- 
lation Jends emphasis to the idea of a Neighborhood Center. 

This change, in the Director's judgment, has proved very 
satisfactory; and the authorized representatives of the wom- 
en's orgiinizations have expressed a similar judgment. It 
seems, too, that from the viewpoint of the citizens of the 
neighborhood — especially the participants in the Center's ac- 
tivities — the change has be(^n equally satisfactory. 

Sri?EKVlSI()N. The general supervisor of the work at this 
Center has been Miss Emih' C. Hood. She has been assisted 
by various workers, of whom some have been volunteers and 
none have been paid by the City. Miss Hood's zealous and 
efficient work has, in the Director's judgment, been the great- 
est asset ill the work. Any observer of the activities and the 
I'esults must conclude that these workers, but Miss Hood in 
particulai-, liave j)e]'formed an inestimable and commendable 
i^)minunity service. 

ACTIVITIES. The most actively participant women — near- 
ly all mothers and housewives of the locality — are organized 
into the Women's Neighborhood Club with regular twice-a- 
nionth meetings and numerous other occasional gatherings, 
— cooking class and practice on Wednesday afternoons, lec- 
tures, dramatic entertainments, social teas, etc. 

The cooking course is directed by a professional instruc- 
tor in domestic science. 

Among the children, many of the activities are profitable 
and educational as well as recreational. Distinct groups have 
regulai-ly assigned periods for sewing, dramatics, domestic 
practice and a variety of handcrafts. Crepe paper and paste- 
board construction groups, the former under a professional 
instrnctor whose services are provided free; cane-seating with 
a group for boys and one for girls; and cooking and table- 
s>ervice are all popular. 

Twenty girls enjoy the Fletcher System in piano; and 
otliers receive individual lessons. This is without cost to the 
children or to the Center. Miss Alice Fox is the instructor 
through whose services this is possible. 

A variety of other pastimes and handcrafts, busying chil- 
(di-eii of various ages and both sexes, are conducted in groups 
of fi-om 10 to 2r), by four volunteer workers who are pupils in 
the Wheelock Kindergarten School. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 417 

Military drills and physical exercises for boys are di- 
rected by a young college student. 

The children of the vicinity to the number of 110 have 
been organized into ''The Neighborhood Club", which con- 
ducts monthly ''socials" for members and non-members; and 
which serves as a medium for promoting the activities that 
have been mentioned. Many children not members of the Club 
])articipate in the activities of the Center. 

J*K()(tKESS. 1024. A trustworthy gauge of the progress of 
the Center since the beginning of the year may be found in 
the enrollment of members in this children's club. These chil- 
dren stand in the relation of both cause and effect to the in- 
terest and attitude of the people in general whose homes are 
in that locality. At the close of 1923 the enrollment in the 
Club was eighty children. The present membership of one 
hundred ten indicates a gain of 371/2 per cent, — a gain which 
the Director considers as indicative of a proportionate in- 
crease in the interest among the people and in the intensity 
and variety of activities at the Center. 

Community Drama in Recreation 

One more distinct field of activity into which entrance 
has been made this past year under the auspices of the Pub- 
lic Welfare and Recreation Commission is that of Recreation- 
al Drama. This matter is at present decidedly a visionary 
experiment, still in its initial stages. It was approved by 
your Commission not until the middle of November. But a 
beginning has already been made. No expense to the City has 
been incurred. A volunteer worker, who is assisting the Di- 
rector in the enlistment of other volunteer workers, is the 
principal asset at present. 

The general theory on which the experiment is being 
made is 

(1) that a City of Somerville's size has a goodly num- 
ber of young men and women who are interested in dramatic 
expression and its kindred arts of aesthetic dancing, pag- 
eantry, choral activities, scenic lighting, stagecraft, public 
speaking, etc. : 

(2) that such interest can be stimulated into organ- 
ized activity encouraged by the Municipal l)e})artment con- 
trolled by your Commission; 

(3) that cultural and recreational value to the com- 
munity at large would result from any considerable actdvity 
by groups thus organized, to be effected by amateur theatricals 
and pageants, organization of district dramatic clubs, etc. 



418 ANNUAL RBPOBTS 

(4) that the Public Recreatiou Centers, Church and 
Parish Associations and Clubs, the High School Players' 
Club, etc., constitute a ready medium of organizing activities. 

(5) that public observances of such holidays as Christ- 
mas, Independence Day, etc., can furnish another medium. 

Mr. Lowell Ames ]!^orris, an experienced social worker, 
playright, former publicit}^ director in AVar Camp Community 
service and Red Cross worker, and contributor to Stage mag- 
azines or in the tield of amateur stagecraft has undertaken to 
assist the Director in this branch of the work, assuming field 
direction, after a])pr()ving vote of the Commission in Novem- 
ber. 

Since the approach of the Christmas season, at the time 
of launching tliis experiment, seemed to afford an occasion 
that illustrated the possibilities for dramatic expression in 
connecticm with Ccmimunity life; and since also the additional 
fi«ld of Public Celebrations direction had been regarded as 
one in wliicli the Welfare and Recreation Department might 
function to serve the City; it was arranged, by ap])roval of 
your Commission, that this Recreation Department should as- 
sume leadership in such a public observance of the Christmas 
season as would, in addition to its primary object, 

(a) Introduce to the Public, this Department's plans 
for future activity in drama and kindred arts of 
expression. 

(b) Establish a background for drama, pageantry and 
stagecraft practice. 

An account of this plan and its execution is given later 
in this report under the caption of ''Public (Celebrations." 
The mention of it here is to show that, with regard to the 
field of Recreational drama, most of the energies of workers — 
Mr. Norris and your Director — were concentrated in this 
Christmas observance with the intent of making it a wedge 
for future enterprise. The Christmas Eve program included 
a Pageant, a brief dramatic episode, choral numbers, and 
successful stagecraft by amateurs. 

In addition to this beginning, several volunteer coaches 
for dramatics — ^students at such institutions as Emerson Col- 
lege of Oratory — have been enlisted for service; presentation 
of the general plan has been made to the young men of the 
recreation centers ; and a demonstration of what amateurs 
do ill drama for recreation has been given at the Recreation 
centers by members of the High School Players' Club who have 
presented them a one-act play. 

In the new year, the Director feels, the work will pro- 
gress OB the foundations thus laid. 



WELFARE AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 419 

General Public Activities 

On three occasions during the year just close<l, there 
have been held Oommunity meetings for the Somerville Public 
—two outdoor assemblies and one indoor meeting — with the 
following objectives : — 

(1) To initiate the development — through free adult 
Kecreatioii in Somerville — of an increased Social 
and Civic spirit among citizens of Somerville. 

(2) To provide Civic instruction calculated to produce 
more intelligent interest and participation in pub- 
lic affairs. 

(3) To acquaint the public with the Recreation oppor- 
tunities of the City and to secure public co-opera- 
tion in the work under the Commission. 

The lirst meeting was held on the evening of February 12, 
in the High School auditorium. About 1,000 persons attended 
and manifested considerable interest. The program included : 

Motion Picture Films presenting Civic ideals and 
lessons. 

^'Silent Talks" (through Stereopticon slides) on 
the History of Somerville. 

''Silent Talks" on the Municipal Business of Som- 
erville. 

Screen pictures of Somerville historic spots, parks, 
public buildings, etc. 
Community Singing. 

Screen presentation of the civic value of Munici- 
pal Recreation, and demonstration of recreation 
activities, opportunities and needs in Somerville. 
An address by the New England Field Representa- 
tive of the Playgrounds and Recreation Associa- 
tion of America. 

The other two meetings offered programs of similar char- 
acter ; but were presented out of doors, one on Richard Trum 
Field and one on Lincoln Park. These were conducted on 
the evenings of September 30, and October 7 respectively. 
Approximately seven thousand people attended the former 
meeting and about three thousand were present at the latter, 
for which the weather conditions were somewhat unfavorable. 

Public Celebrations 

Another new lield into which entrance has been made 
with the approval of the Commission is that of participation 
in the observance of public holidays. On the Fourth of July 
and at Christmas season, this T)ej)artment has cooperated 
with other agencies in this kind of undertaking. 



4lM) AXXCAL RKl'OKT.-. 

Fourth of July 

It has been a Somerville custom for the City and the 
Somerville Fourth of July- Association to collaborate in pro- 
viding the local Fourth of July celebration. This year for the 
first time the Recreation Department, through the Commission 
and the Director proposed participation in this business by 
this Department ; and later its cooperation and assistance 
were requested by the Somerville Fourth of July Association. 
As a major feature of the holiday morning program at Cen- 
tral Hill, the Director with the assistance of several of the 
play supervisors undertook to lead in the organization of some 
500 girls, of ages 12 to 15 years, into a spectacular ''living 
flag." The preparations resulted favorably. A stand with tiers 
of seats for these children was erected as background to the 
area in the natural amphitheatre at the foot of the slope behind 
from the Central Hill redoubt to Medford St., near Oilman 
Square. As a climax to a drill which had been prepared and 
rehearsed under direction of the workers in this Department 
the girls, clad in red, white and blue, suddenly struck relative 
positions, on the stand, by which they presented the appear- 
ance of a huge flag, in a right-angle line of vision to the thou- 
sands of spectators on the incline above them. Immediately 
the girls gave, in unison, the pledge of allegiance to the Ameri- 
can flag; and, still maintaining the organization in represen- 
tation of the Stars and Stripes, they made up the background 
for the remainder of the worth-while program, which in- 
cluded Community singing, addresses by Lt. Governor Fuller, 
and Mavor Webster; a band concert; vaudeville performances; 
etc. 

The rehearsals which occupied the attention of the five 
hundred girls — who dwell in all sections of Somerville — had 
quite as much recreational and civic value, the writer esti- 
mates, as the actual event itself. 

Community Christmas 

The Community Christmas, to which reference has al- 
ready been made in this report, was an enterprise in which 
the Public Welfare and Recreation Department, on its own ini- 
tiative, took the lead in organizing public interest and activity, 
in cooperation with a Committee of Fifteen Citizens. Through 
action of the representative Committee and workers under 
your (Commission the observance was planned, financed and 
carried out. In the financial undertaking the City using less 
than |200 of its appropriation for Celebrations, was a contri- 
butor. The objectives directing the energies of this Depart- 
ment were : — 



WKLFARP: AM) RKCKKATIOX CO.M M I SSIOX. , 421 

1. Increased public inter(\st iu the Community. * 

2. Closer social contact of distinct groups of Somer- 
ville people. 

3. Public interest in the Recreation Department's ac- 
tivities. 

4. Cultivation of the Christmas Spirit. 

5. Recreation for Somerville people on Christmas Eve. 

The Director, estimating the results, submits that the 
preliminary and preparatory activities of the Committee of 
Fifteen Citizens, in cooperation with this Department were 
elfective of tlie first three objectives ; that the publicity attend- 
ing the preparations and the event was conducive to the third 
objective; tliat the program itself, as atfecting thousands of 
Somerville people, was effective of all five objectives ; and that 
this same program, especially as atfecting the large number 
participating in its execution, was equally conducive to all 
these objectives. In explanation of this view the following 
statement of the procedure and the program is given. 

The Committee of Citizens included representatives of 
the Elks, Masons, Knights of Columbus, Catholic Women's 
Club, Federated Women's Clubs, Catholic and Protestant 
Churches, the City Government, the press, the pupils of the 
Somerville High School, and of foreign-born residents who are 
preparing for naturalization as citizens. Volunteer activity 
by members of this Committee and workers in the Recreation 
Department resulted in successful erection and decoration of 
a Community Christmas Tree ; wide publicity ; volunteering 
of special assistance by various groups and individuals ; and 
the Christmas Eve xerogram outlined in a succeeding para- 
graph. 

In publicity, local printers furnished, without cost, post- 
ers, circulars and other printed matter by which persons all 
over Somerville were invited to enter into the Community 
project and kept in touch with developments. Local owners 
of transportation vehicles loaned them for use of singers of 
carols ; social organizations held open house at suggestion 
of the Committee; families gave more than the usual atten- 
tion to exterior Christmas decorations at their homes ; mer- 
chants assisted by display of posters and distribution of 
announcements wrapped in the parcels of shoppers; public 
school teachers and children joined in spreading information 
to the Somerville public ; radio broadcasting stations per- 
mitted messages to the public ; citizens throughout the City 
communicated to the proper agencies the names of invalids 
and shut-ins who would profit by opportunity to hear the 



carol singers iu their tours through the various sections of 
the City; and other citizens were ready with food, refresh- 
ment and hospitality to receive these carol-singers on Clirist- 
mas Eve. 

The Cliristnias Eve program was centered around the 
Community Christmas Tree erected in the City Hall Plaza 
as the central figure in the illumination and decoration 
scheme. On a platform near this tree were presented a choral 
and dramatic pageant by pupils of the Somerville High School 
Players' Club and Girls' Glee Club; a series of appropriate 
musical numbers by members of groups enlisted through the 
Americanization division of the Public School Department ; 
an address by Mayor Webster and carols by some of the sing- 
ing groups to be mentioned below. In this same program 
Community carol singing for those in attendance was con- 
ducted, with the aid of printed sheets provided without cost 
by the Somerville Press. 

The stage lighting and other stagecraft arrangements 
were carried out by volunteer workers. 

Following this set program groups of carolers went in 
various directions from Central Hill, some afoot, some by 
automobile and some by motor truck, to sing at various central 
points including Union. Davis, Teele, Magoun and (lilman 
Squares, through the streets and at the homes of shut-ins and 
invalids. Many thousands heard the caroling. 

The groups of carol singers represented the Public Eve- 
ning Recreation Centers, many of the Protestant Churches, 
the Catholic Women's Club, St. Anthony's Catholic Church 
choir, and the High School Glee Clubs. 

The whole enterprise was undertaken as an experiment 
and begun somewhat late. The Director respectfully submits 
that the results are valuable to the Community and that the 
experience gained will be of great value in intensifying this 
kind of activity and in carrying out various other enterprises 
which the Commission may undertake for Public Welfare and 
Recreation in the future. 

General Suiximary 

This report, up to the present point, has dealt with all of 
the important divisions of the work of 1924: — (1) The Sum- 
mer Playgrounds, (2) The Spring-and-Fall After-School Play- 
grounds, (3) The Saturday ''Neighborhood" Playgrounds, (4) 
The Girls' Canning Activities, (5) Evening Recreation Cen- 
ters, (6) The Neighborhood Center, (7) The General Public 
Activities, (8) The Experiment in Community Recreational 
Drama (9) Public Celebrations. In general summary it may 
be said that a secure footing in all of these fields of under- 



WELFAKE AND RRCR/EATION COMMISSION. i2l) 

takiiiji: has been secured and that the future will show that 
the year 11)1^4 lias seen the bej;iniiings of far-reaching, effect- 
ive work for coniinunity welfare in Somerville. While all of 
the beginnings have been nesessarily modest and slow, thi« 
is a natural condition attendant upon the limitation of re- 
sources and equipment at the disposal of your Commission. 
The Dii'ector's experiences during the year past prompt the ex- 
pression of the estimate that the near future will demonstrate 
that an effective policy for future work has been outlined. 

General Financial Statement 

16,999.78 were expended from the City Treasury, for the 
operations here reported. The sum appropriated had been 
17,000.00. 

Following is a general vstatement of financial expendi- 
tures : — 

Summer Playgrounds 

Supervision $1,877 50 

Supplies, Maintenance, Printing, etc. 872 08 

Janitor, Repair Man, General Helper 108 00 

Other Labor 8 00 

' $2,865 58 



Saturday and Afternoon Playgrounds 

Supervision 1,033 16 

Supplies 73 75 



Evening Recreation Centers 

Supervision ...... 331 50 

Supplies 153 01 



Canning Activities 

Supervision and Instruction . . 341 00 

Supplies 45 



1,106 91 



485 51 



341 45 



Neighborhood Center 

Supervision . . . . . 280 00 

Supplies and Maintenance . , , 114 21 



— 394 21 

Piibllc Meetings 382 42 

Cou'nty Dues (Paid Mid'x Co. Bur. of Agr. 

and Domestic Science) .... 100 00 

Director's Salary 1,258 33 

Hockey Rink, Western Playground . . 38 8S 

Postage, Stationery, Office Supplies, etc. 27 49 

Total . . $6,999 78 



41*4 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

General Recommendatioiis 

Cousideiiii^ pi-esent needs Miid looking to the fnture of 
the Recreation work and the promotion of Public Welfare 
by your Department I submit herewith a series of Recommen- 
dations, action upon which is, in my judgment, necessary or 
highly desirable for future success ; and also some suggestions 
that may assist your Commission in defining its policies and 
in reorganizing or elaborating its program. The recommen- 
dations, some of which have been mentioned in this report 
already, in connection with tlie respective branches of the 
work to which they have special application, are as follows : — 

(1) Employment of a part-time, all-year clerical work- 
er to assist the Director and to act as clerk for 
the Commission. 

(2) Expansion of the Summer Playgrounds organiza- 
tion to include new units for boys at the newly pur- 
chased City land at Elm and Cherrj^ Streets ; the 
area (referred to above in the recommendations 
dealing with Summer Playgrounds) at Glen and 
Oliver Streets ; the grounds of the Union Square 
Branch of tlie Public Librar}', and Tufts College 
Old Campus. 

(3) Securing more adequate play space and improved 
conditions of present areas at Joy Street, Bennett/ 
and Kent Street grounds. 

(4) Early completion of the playground in the rear of 
the Western Junior High School. 

(5) Resurfacing the Morse School Playground and erec- 
tion of high screen fence on southerly side of this 
area. 

(6) Early attention to improvement of Saxton C. Foss 
Park with a view to utilizinsr the lower end of 
it for Playground purposes. 

(7) The planting of some shade trees on several of the 
playgrounds to provide a natural shelter for the 
future. 

(8) Installing of permanent framework for swings and 
teeters at the Morse Playground. 

(9) Provision for a male supervisor at Central Hill 
and Morse playgrounds jointly. 

(10) Increasing from 8 to 16, the number of Saturday 
''Neighborhood Playground units," so as to make 
the organization City-wide. (See "Saturday and 
Afternoon Playgrounds" above.) 



WELFARE AND liECKEATIOX COMMISSION. 425 

(11) Expansion of the After-School supervision of play- 

grounds to provide three sessions per week at each 
unit (instead of two sessions,) and six units (in- 
stead of four.) 

(12) Provision of the necessary field equipment for ten- 

nis, Field Hockey, Soccer, etc., for use at these 
after-school sessions. 

(13) Provision for outdoor active recreation in winter,. 

for children and adults, such as hockey, tobogan- 
ning, and skiing. 

(14) Provision of additional skating rinks for the gen- 
eral public in Winter. 

(15) Providing a Kecreation Center, with others to fol- 
low (for women) on parallel lines with those of 
the young men's centers. 

(16) Provision for additional facilities for indoor athlet- 
ics and physical exercise in all of the Recreation 
Centers for men. 

(17) Employment, in the Recreation Center undertak- 
ing, of special leaders for special activities. 

(18) Provision for securing workers for the Evening 
Recreation Centers who have the special qualifi- 
cations for that work, to overcome the present 
lack of applicants for this work. 

(19) Provision for increased publicity and public in- 
formation concerning the objectives and opportu- 
nities of the Recreation Centers. 

Nearly all of the above recommendations deal with the 
field of the present undertakings of the Commission. Since- 
your Commission has given evidence of a policy of construc- 
tion and expansion, and since the whole organization of your 
Commission's undertaking for Public Welfare and Recrea- 
tion is in a state of evolution, I feel that the Commission will- 
not think it inappropriate for me to submit some further sug- 
gestions for its consideration regarding the expansion of the 
plans to raise municipal recreation from its hitherto undefined 
level to the more definite and comprehensive plans to which 
it is destined if Somerville is to meet the problem presented by 
its large and congested population. 

The following suggestive list is accordingly offered for 
your consideration. It mentions activities for which there 
seems need in Somerville: 



426 ANNUAL RBrORTS. 

Pageantry 

Dramatic Clubs 

Other Activities in Drama 

Forum 

Civic Meetings 

Music Week 

Lectures 

Hockey Kinks. (Some expense incurred under this 

item in 1924.) 
Aquatic Sports Day at Somerville Beach 
Vacant Lot Playground Campaign. 
Marble Tournament 
Municipal Baseball League (Amateur) for Young 

Men 
Public ''Walks" 

In concluding this Report I express cordially my appre- 
ciation for the assistance rendered during the year. 

And a word of special mention should here be used in 
emphasis of the co-operation and friendly attitude of all of 
the playground supervisors, without whose support the Direc- 
tor would be seriously handicapped. 

Gratitude is due the Somerville Playgrounds Association 
for the co-operation and assistance it has rendered. To His 
Honor, Mayor Webster, for his sustained interest in the activi- 
ties of the playground children, shown by this participation 
in the special events of the Summer Season, and for his ready 
oflQcial response to suggestions and requests leading to further- 
ance of the work during the past year, the Director feels that 
this word of appreciation should be expressed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Francis J. Mahoxey^ Director. 



INDEX. 



42T 



INDEX 



City Auditor, Report of ... . 

Balance Sheet 

Cash Statement 

Taxes — Special Assessments . 
Departmental Bills . . . . . 

Water Department Accounts . 
Statement of Estimated Revenue . 
Appropriations ...... 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts . 
County of Middlesex .... 

Revenue and Expenses .... 

Temporary Loans ...... 

Taxes ....... 

Funded Debt 

Maturities on Funded Debt . 

Interest Requirements on Funded Debt 

Borrowing Capacity .... 

Abatements, Refunds, State Income Tax, Etc. 

Overlay Accounts ..... 

Excess and Deficiency Account . 

Receipts and Expenditures, Classification of 

Schedule of Public Property .... 



5 
Q. 

10 

ir 

24 
2& 
2& 
26 

28 

27, 30 

32, 3a 

31, 32, 33: 

34 

35, 36, 37 

37, 3g 

3^ 

40 

74 



City Clerk, Report of . 

Receipts .... 
Payments .... 
Licenses and Permits 
Births .... 

Marriages .... 
Deaths .... 

Assessed Polls and Registered 
Elections .... 
Liquor License Question . 
Ordinances 



Voters 



35$ 
35a 
355 
356 
356 
357 
357 
376 
36ft 
35» 
360 



City Engineer, Report of . . . . 
Engineering Department 
City Engineer Division, Classification of 
Streets Accepted as Public Ways in 1924 
Table of Street Construction . 

Sewer Division 

Sewers and Storm Drains Constructed 

Maintenance Account 

Parks and Playgrounds Division . 

Maintenance Account 

Public and Private Streets . 



Expenses 



31^ 
312 

3ia 

315 
317 
31ft 
320 
321 
32a 
324 
327 



428 



AXXUAL REPORTS 



City Government and Officers for 1924 



377 



City Solicitor, Report of 



161 



City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, Report of 
Revenue and Expense, Statement of 
Cash Statement 

Taxes 

Street Sprinkling Assessments 

Overlay and Abatement . 

Supplementary Assessments . 

Betterment Assessments . 

Departmental Accounts . 

Revenue Loans .... 

Bonds ..... 

Borrowing Capacity 

Memorandum of Payments on account of Debt 

Treasury Department ..... 



77 
78 
79, 80 
86 
87 
88 
88 
89 
90 
91 
93, 94, 95 
78 
95 
^6 



Commissioner of Public Buildings (see Public Buildings 
Commissioner) ........ 



340 



Commissioner of Streets (see Street Commissioner) 
Commissioner of Water (see Water Commissioner) 



301 

277 



Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights, Report of 
Inspection of Wiring in Buildings 

Fire Alarm System 

. Police Signal System . . 

Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets 
Street Lighting . . . 

Recommendations ...... 

Conclusion ........ 



349 
349 
350 
351 
351 
352 
352 
352 



Fire Department, Chief of, Report of 
Alarms of Fire 
List of Probable Causes 
Manual Force . 
Apparatus . 
Hose . 
Resume 

Recommendations 
Conclusion 



265 
265 
265 
267 
267 
267 
268 
269 
269 



Health, Board of, Report of . 
Organization, Officers, etc. 
Nuisances . 
Permits and Licenses 
Stables 

Board of Infants 
Deaths 

Mortality Statistics . 
Diseases Dangerous to Public Health 
Specimens and Supplies . 



118 
118 
119 
119 
120 
121 
125 
122 
127 
127 



INDEX. 



429 



Medical Inspection of Schools 
Bacteriological Departmient 
Undertakers 

Examination of Plumbers 
Health Nurses, Report of 
Medical Inspection, Report of 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar . 



128 
130 
130 
130 
130, 132 
134 
137 
141 



Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Report of 



137 



Inspector of Buildings (see Public Buildings Commis- 
sioner) 



Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, Report of the 



City Physician, Report of 



Law Department, Report of , 



340 
141 

156 
161 



Licensing Commission, Report of 
Medical Inspection, Report of 

Visits 

Contagious Disease Hospital 

Laboratory Examinations 

Tuberculosis 

Infant Hygiene Clinics . 



270 
134 
134 
134 
134 
135 
136 



Ordinances 



360 



Planning Board, Report of . 

Organization .... 
Previous Recommendations 
Zoning Ordinance, Enactment of 
Recommendations 
Appropriations .... 



112 
112 
112 
114 
115 
116 



Police, Chief of, Report of . 

Arrests 

Crimes and Offenses Against the Person - 
Crimes and Offenses Against Property . 
Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order 
Recapitulation ...... 

Roster of Department . ... 

Changes in the Force . . . 
Liquor Officers, Report of . 
Police Matron, Report of . 
Conclusion 



151 
151 
151 
151 
152 
153 
156 
157 
159 
160 
160 



Population 



147,215^59 



480 



AXXTAL RKTOR' 



lie Buildings Commissioner, Report of . 


340 


Inspection of Buildings 


340 


Coal 


343 


Elevators 


343 


School Buildings 


343 


Fire Department Buildings 


345 


Municipal Buildings 


346 


Libraries 


346 


Water, Highway, Sanitary and Sewer Buildings . 


346 


Hospital Buildings 


347 


Police Buildings ....... 


347 


Bath House 


347 


In General 


348 



Public Grounds (City Engineer) 



323 



Public Library 

Board of Trustees and Officers — Committees . 
Organization of Library and Staff Personnel 
Report of Trustees ...... 

Report of Librarian 

Statistics ........ 



97 

97 

98 

101 

102 

107 



Public Welfare. Department of . 

Members of the Board, Committees, Officers, etc. 
Report of General Agent . 

Full Support 

Partial Support .... 
Aid Under 1913 Law (Mothers' Aid) 

Cost to City 

Reimbursements .... 

Somerville Hospital .... 
Population and Gross Expenditures 
Overseers of the Poor Since 1885 . 
Recapitulation ..... 
City Home, Report of Warden 
City Physician, Report of 



144 
144 
146 
146 
146 
146 
146 
147 
147 
147 
148 
148 
149 
150 



Public Welfare and Recreation Commission . 
Financial Statement . . . . 



383 
423 



Sanitary Department, Report of . 
Collection of Ashes and Paper 



110 
110 



School Department 

Superintendent of Schools, Report of 

Appendix, Contents of . 

Accommodations 

Dental Dispensary . 

Graduates — High school . 

Junior High schools 
Vocational schools 



163 
166 
203 
171 
201 
237 
242 
251 



High School Athletic Association 



199 



INDEX. 



431 



Report of Head Master, High School 

Director of the Continuation Schools and 
Americanization Work 
History of the Somerville High School 
School Committee, 1923-1924 . 
School Nnrses .... 
Somerville Teachers' Association 
Somerville Teachers' Club 
Teachers in Service 



181 

184 
191 
164, 251 
202 
197 
198 
253 



Sealer of Weights and Measures, Report of 



272 



Sewers (see City Engineer) 



319 



Street Commissioner, Report of 
Appropriations . 
Highway Maintenance 
Snow and Ice . 
Bridges 

Street Railways 
Underground Wires . 
Crushed Stone . 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Street Sprinkling 
Street Cleaning . 
Suppression of Moths 
Shade Trees 

Highways Construction, New Streets 
Sidewalks Construction . 
Streets Constructed in 1924 . 
Highways Construction, Permanent Pavement 
Reconstruction and Resurfacing 
Miscellaneous .... 
Permit . . . . 

Recommendations 
Public and Private Streets 



301 
301 
302 
302 
303 
303 
303 
304 
304 
304 
304 
305 
305 
305 
306, 308 
307 
307 
309 
310 
310 
311 
327 



Water Commissioner, Report of . . 
Revenue and Expenditures . 
Cost of Water Works .... 
Water Works Income and Distribution . 
Water Distribution System, Construction 

Hydrants, Gates, etc 

Water Services ..... 

Water Meters 

Summary of Pipes and Fixtures . 
Water Assessments and Consumption . 
Construction, Maintenance, Operation . 
Water Rate Lien Law .... 
Street Mains, Gates, Hydrants, etc. 
Summary of Statistics .... 
Financial Statistics 



277 
280 
280 
281 
281 
282 
283 
284 
286 
286 
288 
290 
292 
299 
300